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Boiling water for Neti Pots...??

Discussion in 'Diving Medicine' started by DandyDon, Dec 16, 2011.

  1. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

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    These are often suggested here, by one of our contributing physicians as I recall. I wasn't sold on them, but kept trying mine and have grown somewhat fond of it. My home dive bud swears by his. Anyway, it seems I need to start using bottled water from sterile jugs rather than tap water...

    From Neti Pot Deaths Linked to Brain-Eating Amoeba in Tap Water
     
  2. Rascally Rabbit

    Rascally Rabbit Solo Diver

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    Not only do you need sterile water but you need to regularly sterilize the pot/bottle.
    I use the nasal irrigator squeeze bottle instead of the gravity feed neti pot. The instructions clearly warn to keep the equipment and water supply sterile. The instruction that came with mine suggests heating the water inside the bottle using a microwave, adding the saline and allowing it to cool to a comfortable temperture for use. The water I use is fresh from a 5 stage reverse osmosis water purifier and after it is boiled mixed and cooled then used immediately.
     
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  3. bleeb

    bleeb Photographer

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    I'd guess thorough boiling (a minute or several?) would be needed if you're on well water, but are bugs like this significantly likely to survive a full-up municipal water system with chlorine? How about non-chlorinated ones? Water that's gone through a consumer water filter and that hasn't been boiled might also be an issue. Still should sterilize all your own containers..
     
  4. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas High Plains
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    Amoebas In Drinking Water: A Double Threat - Science News
     
  5. bleeb

    bleeb Photographer

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    Location: Ottawa, Canada
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  6. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
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    Treated water seems safer, but not enough maybe? We always have those amoebas in our lakes and ponds in the south every winter, with few deaths - but forcing the water up your nose seems to increase the risk. I guess it's all relative.
     
  7. Duke Dive Medicine

    Duke Dive Medicine Scuba Media & Publications

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  8. DocVikingo

    DocVikingo Senior Member Staff Member

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    Even if you dive in risk locations (see DDM's CDC link immediately above), I'd put this very low on your list of health concerns as it is extremely rare.

    Here's results from a couple studies:

    In the USA, over the period 1937-2007, a total of 121 cases were reported.

    In the USA, over the period 2001-2010, a total of 32 cases were reported.

    The reason it gets press is the staggering lethality of the infection. Only ~3-5% of those infected survive. Even given modern antibiotics and improved supportive care techniques, the survival rate is extremely small.

    Regards,

    DocVikingo
     
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