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BP Supports GOM Marine research project

Discussion in 'Texas' started by RaginCajun, Apr 15, 2008.

  1. RaginCajun

    RaginCajun Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Panama City Beach FL
    256
    18
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    Since this is in our back yard I figured I'd post it here.....if I can find a way to upload the photos I will but so far it looks like the company may have blocked them....


    BP supports Gulf of Mexico marine research project

    By Planet BP
    Tuesday, April 15, 2008


    BP has donated $30,000 to Louisiana State University to purchase a digital camera system to support the SERPENT project, a global collaboration between the petroleum industry and academia that uses industrial remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) for research during periods of operational standby time.

    The camera system, which is compatible with BP ROVs deployed at BP drilling and production sites, includes an eight-megapixel digital camera, strobe and control hardware and software.

    According to Mark Benfield, an LSU Oceanography and Coastal Sciences professor and coordinator of the SERPENT project, the system enables more definitive identification of marine species in the Gulf of Mexico and provides high-quality images for scientific and outreach publications.

    Editor's Note: The slide show above right features seven images taken by ROVs during the SERPENT project. Here are the descriptions for each image:

    Slide 1: A manefish imaged by Oceaneering below Ocean Confidence. This is the first time an adult manefish has been documented in the Gulf of Mexico and this also appears to be the best footage of a manefish recorded in the ocean.

    Slide 2: A swimming snail called a heteropod imaged below Thunder Horse PDQ by Saipem-America. These small organisms are predators that feed on other gelatinous organisms.

    Slide 3: A jellyfish called Periphyllopsis braueri imaged by Oceaneering beneath the Discoverer Enterprise.

    Slide 4: This jellyfish called Solmissus is one of the most common organisms we see. It was imaged by Saipem-America beneath the Thunderhorse PDQ.

    Slide 5: A large colonial organism called a siphonophore imaged by Oceaneering beneath Ocean Confidence. This one is called Stephanomia and it was coiled up in a tight helix when first observed. The lights from the ROV caused it to unwind and swim off.

    Slide 6: A viperfish (Chauliodus sloani) imaged by Oceaneering beneath Ocean Confidence. This small fish is only a few inches long but it's a fearsome predator with large teeth relative to its body.

    Slide 7: A squid called Octopoteuthis imaged by Oceaneering beneath the Discoverer Enterprise.
     
  2. BlueC5Kitten

    BlueC5Kitten Photographer

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: San Antonio, TX
    82
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    Can you post the link to the article or web-page where it is found? Or is this posted on your intranet?

    I'd really like to see the photos!
     
  3. RaginCajun

    RaginCajun Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Panama City Beach FL
    256
    18
    18
    The news was posted internally, and the pictures were a slide show that I can't download.

    Sorry.

    If I can find them somewhere else I'll upload them or post the link.
     
  4. RaginCajun

    RaginCajun Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Panama City Beach FL
    256
    18
    18
    Here are some of the photos from one of the LSU professors.

    As I understand it the new camera equipment will be a big improvement over these.

    Cheers!

    [​IMG]

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    [​IMG]




    The photos may not be in the order described in the initial post.
     
  5. drbill

    drbill The Lorax for the Kelp Forest

    # of Dives:
    Location: Santa Catalina Island, CA
    20,889
    3,391
    113
    $30,000 for an 8 megapixel camera? I could have purchased a gross of them with that money! Just teasing... I know it must be a custom job for use on the ROV, and include housing, controls, etc.
     

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