Can you dive Pearl Harbor ???

Discussion in 'Hawai'i' started by ScubaBrett22, Sep 23, 2009.

  1. ScubaBrett22

    ScubaBrett22 Lionfish Slayer

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    I was wondering can you dive Pearl Harbor?? or any of the sunken ships it just seems way cooler to look at the wreck from below then above??? I know its a historical site and all but it would be cool to swim around it and get a good look at it if anyone knows please comment!!! :D :D :cool2:

    I am also not trying to disrespect anyone who served on the ship it self or was in Pearl Harbor when the Japanese attacked i just am 15 and would love to know i just find ships like that fascinating =)
     
  2. DennisS

    DennisS Great White

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    They won't let you dive the Arizona and the rest of the harbor is pretty much an active navy base with all the security that goes with it.
     
  3. ScubaBrett22

    ScubaBrett22 Lionfish Slayer

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Boca Raton / Parkland FL
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    The Arizona is where the monument building is correct and are you allowed to dive the other wreck the USS UTAH ? I was looking at it in google earth.
     
  4. Cave Diver

    Cave Diver Moderator Staff Member

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  5. vinegarbiscuit

    vinegarbiscuit Barracuda

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    USS Arizona et.al. is off-limits to anyone except designated official research and monitoring divers. Even if recreational divers were permitted on the wreck, it doesn't sound like it would be an easy dive: I understand that visibility is extremely limited. This is caused by wave action that stirs up the sediment covering the wreck and the harbor's sea-bed, as well as the oil still leaking from the ship. Plus, PH is still an active military base (another reason that diving the Arizona would guarantee you a one-way ticket to Gitmo), and I can't imagine that the ships churning through the water help the viz much, either. Not that limited viz would stop a lot of folk, of course! A woman who was allowed to accompany research divers on the Arizona wrote an account of her experiences and posted pics . You can read it here: Bubbagirl.com - On The USS Arizona--What A Thrill!
     
  6. ScubaBrett22

    ScubaBrett22 Lionfish Slayer

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Boca Raton / Parkland FL
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    AWW Shucks i have a lot of respect for what they did i just wish the would allow divers on there to go around it once every few years and allow the area to be in a no boat zone and u would pay a good price to go i would pay anything to go see the ship the USS Arizona....
     
  7. ScubaBrett22

    ScubaBrett22 Lionfish Slayer

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Boca Raton / Parkland FL
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    well u know what i mean i would do anything to dive there or even to see the ship under
    water and sit in the sand and just look at it to see what happend and to kinda feel what happend...... me and my emotions
    i am extremley sensitive to peoples fealings i cant hurt some ones fealing with out crying
     
  8. Cave Diver

    Cave Diver Moderator Staff Member

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    You could probably dive it, but I bet you'll have some armed guys waiting for you when you surface. If they let you surface...
     
  9. DiveMaven

    DiveMaven Great White

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    Keep in mind that these ships are GRAVE SITES. Especially the USS Arizona where survivors who die later can have their ashes dropped into the ship. I don't think any ship designated as a "grave site" is open to recreational divers, which is respectful and right IMO.

    If you want to dive some really cool WWII wrecks, go to Truk Lagoon (Chuuk) and dive the ships there. There's also Scapa Flow near Britain for German wrecks, and in Guam you can dive a WWI German ship and a WWII Japanese ship and actually touch them both at the same time. There are also U-boats that are diveable off the east coast of the United States. Unfortunately you can no longer go to Bikini Atoll and dive the atomic fleet.
     
  10. ScubaBrett22

    ScubaBrett22 Lionfish Slayer

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Boca Raton / Parkland FL
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    Are there any wrecks in Germany ?????????????????????? If anyone knows tell me i have a cousin that wants me to go to Germany and i haven't felt the urge but now i kinda do. :D:D:D:D:D:rofl3:
     
  11. gndpdr

    gndpdr Barracuda

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    i belive that 'ediving' is working on a simulator site for the arizona
     
  12. imwright1985

    imwright1985 Manta Ray

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    Location: West Palm Beach, FLorida
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  13. vinegarbiscuit

    vinegarbiscuit Barracuda

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    Location: Brooklyn, NY
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    I'm not sure whether Germany's rather brief coastline has WWII wrecks - I can't imagine the conditions would be hugely pleasant, even so! The Baltic and North Seas can be unforgiving, although there are dedicated divers who call those cold waters 'home'. Plus, any wrecks off the German coast would probably also be considered by various European governments (depending on the ship's origins) as war graves, and therefore off-limits to recreational divers. I've heard wreck divers get into some pretty heated debates about the ban on diving wrecked US warships like the Arizona while they're allowed to dive wrecked Japanese and German warships. Some see no inconsistency, while others get quite peeved about it, and argue that one rule should exist for all: entombed sailors are all fallen soldiers in battle, no matter where they're from and deserve the same respect. Should there be be a uniform standard, either where suitably certified divers have access to all warships or conversely, none at all? Somehow, I don't think an answer will be forthcoming in the near future...
     
  14. ScubaBrett22

    ScubaBrett22 Lionfish Slayer

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Boca Raton / Parkland FL
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  15. imwright1985

    imwright1985 Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: West Palm Beach, FLorida
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    Just become an oober famous film maker and you can do whatever you want
     
  16. Thalassamania

    Thalassamania Diving Polymath ScubaBoard Supporter

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    Bikini is allowing certain types of vessels to visit Bikini Atoll and dive on the wrecks provided definitive prior arrangements are made with Bikini Atoll Divers.

    These vessels or yachts must be completely self-contained, and must include:

    • adequate international communications equipment
    • housing, dining facilities, and supplies (all food, water, medical equipment, etc)
    • all equipment needed to fill tanks and take care of divers, including any nitrox, oxygen or specialized medical equipment
    • preferably have a helicopter for medical evacuation purposes
    During such visits our local government will send along a diver and up to two Local Government Council representatives--at the vessel owner's expense--to make sure that no artifacts are removed from the ships.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------

    My understanding is that there is no one there and that if you have a world ranging ship they'd be hard pressed to even know that you're there, not to mention diving.
     
  17. scottitheduck

    scottitheduck Scuba Instructor

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    Another good place for WW2 wrecks is Coron in the Philippines....... we had a great time there in March. Check it out!

    G
     
  18. Black_3000psi

    Black_3000psi Manta Ray

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    im sure you dont mean any disrespect. i too have often wondered would it would be like to just drop down into the sand and just look at it.i have lived here since 98 and have never been to the memorial. just have no desire to see it like that. but to be in the water that would be something.
     
  19. ScubaBrett22

    ScubaBrett22 Lionfish Slayer

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Boca Raton / Parkland FL
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    Agree it would be something just to get all the boats to stop and let all the silt go away and just sit there and look at it. It would be the most amazing feeling in the world. Just to be feet away from something huge that happen in our Military's History or even are History in general.
     
  20. vinegarbiscuit

    vinegarbiscuit Barracuda

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Brooklyn, NY
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    This is WAY off topic, but too good a story to resist...an acquaintence of mine dreamed of diving Bikini's wrecks, and finally managed to put together an week-long expedition there. All the necessary arrangements were put in place, and as Thalassamania said, they are extensive (and expensive). Owing to the atoll's isolation, very strict rules were in place on this expedition: at the first twinge of any pain or the slightest evidence of DCS symptoms, divers were demanded to forego the the rest of their dives. The hassle, expense (and chances of survival for a badly-stricken DCS diver) of an evacuation are just too great, so caution is the byword here.

    Unfortunately for our hero, he started experiencing blurred vision and pain in his arms and back after only the first day's dives. That was enough for his team-mates, and he was ordered to reamin dry for the rest of the trip. Hanging his head and bemoaning his fate, he reached up to rub a his eye (a self-pitying tear, perhaps?!), and you can imagine his amazement - and horror - when both his contact lenses fell out of that one eye. I guess that explained his blurry vision! As for his tingling arm...turns out he was used to having his wife hump all his gear when diving at home (don't ask!), and since she didn't come on the trip with them, he strained a muscle when trying to move it on his own. It wasn't enough of an explaination to satisfy his expedition mates, though, and he was forced to sit out the rest of the dives. Poor sod. I mean, there's caution and then there's just plain ball-busting!
     

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