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Fresh water coral?

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba Discussions' started by jsado, Aug 26, 2007.

  1. jsado

    jsado Barracuda

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: upstate NY
    229
    7
    0
    Is there such a thing as fresh water coral? We dove today in lake Ontario at about 30 ft and saw something that looks like the start of coral. I have no idea. My buddy has dove in many places where he's seen coral in salt water. He says it looked just like coral. Is this possible?
     
  2. BidAndDive.com

    BidAndDive.com Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: NYC
    97
    1
    0
    Never heard of it. Maybe it was a stalagmite (or stalagtite, because I have no idea what the difference is) formation?
     
  3. wedivebc

    wedivebc CCR Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives:
    Location: Vancouver Island
    4,927
    672
    113
    In Pavillion Lake BC there are formations that are thought to resemble fresh water coral however I believe they are actually bacteria colonies. Do a search on Pavillion and see if the pics match what you saw.
     
  4. archman

    archman Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: SE Florida
    4,956
    49
    48
    To my (expert) knowledge, there is no such creature as freshwater coral.

    Excluding mineral formations other posters have mentioned, there are also gelatinous freshwater bryozoan colonies. They can be common in lakes and ponds in summer months, and get as big across as a basketball. Their "zooids" may eerily resemble translucent or brownish polyps of star corals.

    If you touch it and it feels like rubber, it's probably a phylactolaemate bryozoan. They are harmless and rather fun to mess with.
     
  5. gomi_otaku

    gomi_otaku Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Ballard, Seattle WA
    148
    0
    0
    I like that I found this same question on Yahoo's Ask website, and someone in Minnesota claimed that there is a "dead reef" in the lake he regularly dives in. Well duh- MN used to be covered with salt water, I have plenty of coral samples from the banks of the Mississippi river. But they are fossils, not live coral.
    gomi_
     
  6. ohmdiver

    ohmdiver Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: ohmdiver@hotmail.com
    9,244
    80
    0
    For what it is worth, Skeanatlas Lake has an area well known for fossilized stag horn coral
     
  7. archman

    archman Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: SE Florida
    4,956
    49
    48
    Ooh, neato! Those ancient waters must've been quite toasty.
     
  8. Thalassamania

    Thalassamania Diving Polymath ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives:
    Location: On a large pile of smokin' A'a, the most isolated
    22,159
    2,732
    0
    As far as I know there's no such thing as LIVING fresh water coral.
     
  9. SOkie

    SOkie Divemaster

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Menominee, MI - USA
    5
    0
    0
    I'm no expert, but is it possible that it was freshwater sponges? Last year, they started popping up in the Green Bay off of Menominee, MI. I did some research and talked to the DNR and found out they are in "clean" water which I guess is caused from the zebra mussels. (Did a dive today and vis was less than a foot - so not sure how true THAT is ha ha). The sponges can get quite large. Just a suggestion. (I had never seen anything like this before).
     
  10. archman

    archman Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: SE Florida
    4,956
    49
    48
    Sure there's freshwater sponges. They just don't look like coral. ;)
     

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