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pocket rescue mask

Discussion in 'General Scuba Equipment Discussions' started by antarctica, Jun 11, 2012.

  1. antarctica

    antarctica Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Maryland or Maine
    6
    0
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    I'm a rescue diver, so I recently bought a pocket rescue mask to keep in my BCD pocket. The masks at my local store stocked were the emergency first responder brand and went for $30...I thought I could do better so I bought a basic mask online for $5. My two questions are - why would a mask be that expensive? Does the case have an O ring on it or something? Also, since the case for my new mask is clearly not watertight, would that be an issue in a rescue scenario if I take out a rescue mask which had been immersed in salt water - in other words, should I be keeping my rescue mask dry?
     
  2. flots am

    flots am Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Wherever you go in life, that's where you are.
    3,225
    1,854
    113
    Good idea!
    No-so-good-idea. :cool:

    I've never seen one that had an o-ring in the case, and have certainly never seen one that was submersible.

    Yes. The mask contains a filter that keeps airborne particles from being transferred between the victim and rescuer. Being wet will clog it, making the mask unusable.

    The mask should be kept in your dive bag or first aid kit

    flots.
     
  3. antarctica

    antarctica Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Maryland or Maine
    6
    0
    0
    Thanks for the advice! Normally I would not think to keep it in my bcd pocket, but the PADI rescue diver book says somewhere that you should store a mask in your bcd pocket so you can do rescue breaths easier at the surface...but yeah, it just doesn't make sense to submerge it!
     
  4. nimoh

    nimoh Public Safety Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Rochester, MN
    3,457
    1,680
    113
    I don't believe the rescue masks clog when wet, and although I don't carry one while diving (I have one in my first aid kit), I don't see a problem with it.

    So, I'll wait until someone can back up a statement on this before deciding (since I can't back up mine).
     
  5. rhwestfall

    rhwestfall Orca

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: "La Grande Ile"
    5,705
    3,043
    113
  6. flots am

    flots am Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Wherever you go in life, that's where you are.
    3,225
    1,854
    113
    Mine contains a filter. Even if you could blow the water out, seawater is far from sterile and I wouldn't want it in my mask anyway.

    flots.
     
  7. RickyF

    RickyF Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Oahu
    611
    187
    43
    They make several different types of masks. Some have the filter and some do not. The idea is to provide short quick breaths into the victum. I personally don't carry one because there is really no place on a backplate / wing setup. My priority is to get the person to the boat or shore where proper rescue can happen. If necessary, I will do emergency breaths without the mask. I have never seen or know anyone that carries one in the water, but I guess there are probably those somewhere that do.
     
  8. g1138

    g1138 Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Charleston, SC
    2,898
    675
    113
    Have you tried doing effective in-water rescue breathing without a solid bottom to stand on while making efficient forward progress towing? Even in calm waters it's a hard process.

    Keep the mask on shore with your surface support. It'll take out the hassle of dealing with a positive buoyant piece of equipment and maintenance/cleanliness of your one-way filter valve.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2012
  9. Scuba_Jay

    Scuba_Jay Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Orange County, CA
    8
    0
    0
    My experience is that a wet filter greatly increases the breathing resistance making it difficult to render rescue breaths. My preference is to carry a rescue mask without a filter in my BCD - in choppy water it helps a lot with airway protection. I find it also makes it easier to get a good seal without having to tilt the victim's head too far to one side or having to constantly kick myself up and over the victim.

    I also keep a complete rescue mask in my emergency kit on shore.
     
  10. DeepSeaDan

    DeepSeaDan Public Safety Diver

    # of Dives:
    Location: Ontario, Canada
    992
    120
    43
    As someone who performs field resucitation regularly, I've got issues with pocket masks offshore. They are:

    > Establishing / maintaining an effective seal. Try it in the dry sometime in ideal conditions on a suitable mankin; most mask brands require two full hand grips to seal effectively, whilst maintaining proper head tilt, whilst delivering an appropriate volume of air to the patient - no small feat in ideal conditions.

    > Mask contamination

    > Patient propulsion. If you're a lone rescuer, you'll be forced to tow the patient by their jawline / head to make way while attempting to breathe for them. If you have help, you'll be a hinderence to speed due to the necessary body position for delivering breaths.

    > Inability to conduct REALISTIC practice. This problem extends for all forms of in-water rescue breathing, making it difficult to impossible to evaluate the efficacy of a given technique, or for the develoment of rescuer skill competency.

    In most instances I believe it to be in the patient's best interest for the rescuer to make all speed for the nearest hard, flat, & dry surface to conduct effective BLS. There are exceptions of course, for instance: a witnessed drowning where the patient is recovered to surface quickly. Chances are the patient's heart is still functioning & respirations might be restored quickly with immediate ventillations. There are no doubt other examples. Perhaps it would be best to educate rescuers to the realities, then train them to use common sense judgement on a case-by-case basis. But I digress. Keep the pocket mask w/ oxygen port in the 1st aid kit & provide your patient about 40% O2, or better yet, get certified in the use of a bag valve & give them close to 100% O2!

    Regards,
    DSD
     
    Ulfhedinn and RickyF like this.

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