Scuba Geocaching

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba Discussions' started by rachelscott51, Sep 24, 2004.

  1. rachelscott51

    rachelscott51 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Seattle, WA
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    I've recently gotten into geocaching and have heard, but not seen, any underwater caches. What do people know? I'm assuming this is on the rise in the U.S. and worldwide. I'm excited about the prospect!

    Anyone else have experience with UW geocaches?
     
  2. boomx5

    boomx5 Surface Interval Member

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    I've never seen underwater caches yet, but I've heard they're out there. I should take some time and plant a couple. I just need to sit down and figure out how I'm going to do it.
     
  3. jonnythan

    jonnythan Knight Scublar ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Upstate NY
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    I know of at least one, and it's in Kingston, placed there by one of our very own..
     
  4. Mike Veitch

    Mike Veitch Dive Resort

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    Maybe i'm a little slow but what is a geocache?
     
  5. jonnythan

    jonnythan Knight Scublar ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Upstate NY
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    www.geocaching.com

    With the advent of cheap handheld GPS units, people have taken to putting little treasure boxes (usually tupperware containers with a notepad and some various cute, cheap items) and logging their coordinates on this web site. Basically, if you want to get into it, you find geocaches near where you live using their search function, then input the coordinates into your GPS unit and go a-huntin. When you find the cache, you take an item, leave an item, and log your find on the web site. You can place your own caches.

    They're doing very interesting things with traveling caches, traveling items, mystery caches, multicaches.... lots of fun though, and it gets you outside or gives you something to do during the SI ;)
     
  6. rachelscott51

    rachelscott51 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Seattle, WA
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    A geocache is a sort of treasure chest "cache" (pronounced cash) that can be found through use of a GPS and sometimes, through clues as well. You can go to different websites and they will list the caches in your area. You get a coordinate on the site that you then go out exploring to find it using your GPS. Once found, within the cache are items that can be taken, though you must replace what you take with your own little token. Often there will be a log book that you can put your name in to show you found it. You can find out more about it at www.geocaching.com and other similar websites. It's really fun and I want to get involved underwater now.
     
  7. Jmaserati

    Jmaserati Single Diver

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  8. Mako Mark

    Mako Mark Scuba Instructor

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    I have been meaning to set some around here, but havent managed to get to it yet. I think it is a fun Idea.

    (note to self: Maybe I should geo cache myself with a note that I should be sent to Monaco to live in a palace, I wonder if you are allowed to geo cache humans.)
     
  9. rachelscott51

    rachelscott51 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Seattle, WA
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    Besides clues from shore from a GPS point, how else would you go about setting up a scuba cache?
     
  10. MSilvia

    MSilvia Great White

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Cohasset, Massachusetts USA
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    Well, clues from non-shore coordinates comes to mind. In other words, coordinates for the boat. Since you'd have some variation due to tides and currents, you might want more detail than just the surface coordinates.
     
  11. diver567

    diver567 Nassau Grouper

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    I once found a Kermnit the frog at The Pinnacle dive site in Utila. I wasn't given any clues I just happened across it. Is the appropriate etiquette to leave the object for others to find? I presume so.
     
  12. rachelscott51

    rachelscott51 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Seattle, WA
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    Yes, or replace with an object of your own.
     
  13. ZenSquirrel

    ZenSquirrel Nassau Grouper

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    I've toyed with this idea before and this is the best that I have come up with.

    GPS does not work underwater so: You give the GPS coordinates of the water entry point. Be it from shore or from a boat. Assuming that you were from the shore you would then give a clue as to where to search next. For example, you could say that the cache is somewhere along a heading of 120 degrees. You then have to scuba along that bearing until you find the cache.

    In my opinion the underwater seach would be the most fun and there a bunch of fun variation on the theme.

    Easiest is to give a compass bearing, distance, and aprox depth. So you say, follow 120 degrees for 40 feet at an aprox depth of 30 feet to find the cache.

    You can give just a bearing and a max depth. Follow 120 degrees. You should find the cache above 60 feet.

    You can give just a distance. The cache is within 20 feet of the point.

    More fun can be had by stringing nav points together. You get a number of plastic stakes and number and/or color them for easy reference then you combine the seach types. For example:

    Nav 1 is 20 feet from shore.
    Nav 2 is off Nav 1 at 120 degrees and is above 90 feet.
    Nav 3 is within 30 feet of nav 2 and is between 60-70 feet.
    Nav 4 is 40 feet away from Nav 3 along 60 degrees.

    The cache is at the last stake. Or you could put a box locked with a combination lock and the numbers on the stakes are the combination. Or you have to contact the "cacher" with the proper code to get to the cache. Etc, etc.

    Have not had the time/energy to actually try this. It would probably be the most fun/challenging in a murky lake. Probably not a good idea to sink a bunch of stakes into a reef.

    Keith
     
  14. FreeFloat

    FreeFloat Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Somewhere in the waters of Lake Ontario or the St
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  15. rachelscott51

    rachelscott51 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Seattle, WA
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    Sounds like you could also float a gps in a diver down float as well and try to triangulate where you are.
     
  16. FreeFloat

    FreeFloat Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Somewhere in the waters of Lake Ontario or the St
    1,862
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    My Garmin e-Trex is waterproof to 3' or so I believe. It'll lose signal as soon as it's underwater of course, but I solved the problem by floating it in a Ziploc bag half filled with air (also because I wasn't sure if it would float or sink when left to its own devices)

    If you check my cache listing, you'll see I posted the coordinates for the actual cache itself, as well as the micro..... Maybe that makes it "too easy", but all the micro contains is actual directions for how to find the cache using a dive compass, no GPS required!
     
  17. FreeFloat

    FreeFloat Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Somewhere in the waters of Lake Ontario or the St
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    Actually, re reading this thread has just given me another idea for a scuba related cache...... hehehe
     
  18. Deep Lake

    Deep Lake Angel Fish

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    I found one in Lake Coeur d Alene Idaho last summer. I talked to some locals who said that there are at least 5 of them in the lake.
     
  19. rjchandler

    rjchandler Manta Ray

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    Wow - something to do with a GPS besides record the co-ordinates of all the Tim Horton's between here and Tobermory.
     
  20. Jmaserati

    Jmaserati Single Diver

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    Rachel, see this link from my msg. above... I think it's kind of a fun experiment:


    http://groups.msn.com/divergps
     

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