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DougK
June 4th, 2006, 12:56 PM
In the post below about Greenpeace not being happy with the Oriskiny (SP?) there is the following statement:

"We never really made it on the map as far as being a dive destination," Phillips said. But he predicted that would change, as one of only three sunken aircraft carriers in the world now sits on the ocean floor only an hourís boat ride from shore. "Now that the Oriskany's here, that will put us probably close to the top."

So where are the other two aircraft carriers? Any what difficulties are there in diving these other ships?

Boiler_81
June 4th, 2006, 01:55 PM
Bikini Atoll is the location of the Saratoga. It is the only other divable aircraft carrier that I am aware of.

H20Bubbles
June 4th, 2006, 02:01 PM
Per Wikiepedia, the following US Aircraft Carriers have been sunk.

* USS Langley

* USS Hornet: American aircraft carrier sunk on 27 October 1942 by aircraft during the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands.

* USS Lexington: American aircraft carrier sunk on 8 May 1942 by carrier aircraft during the Battle of the Coral Sea.

* USS Princeton: American aircraft carrier sunk on 24 October 1944 by carrier based aircraft durnig the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

* USS Wasp: American aircraft carrier sunk on 15 September 1942 by Japanese submarine I-19 while escorting transports to Guadalcanal.

* USS Yorktown: American aircraft carrier sunk on 7 June 1942 by carrier-based aircraft during the Battle of Midway.

* USS Independence: The highly radioactive hulk was later taken to Pearl Harbor and San Francisco for further tests and was finally sunk in weapons tests off the coast of California 29 January 1951.

* USS Constellation: Rumors have circulated that the Constellation will soon become a fishing reef 10 miles offshore of Esteyville, CA.

* USS America: America was sunk in a controlled scuttling on 14 May 2005 at approximately 1130, although the sinking was not publicized until six days later. The ship rests about 6000 ft. below the Atlantic Ocean surface, roughly 60 miles off the North Carolina coast.

* USS Oriskany: Oriskany was scuttled in 210 feet (65 m) of water in the Gulf of Mexico on 17 May 2006.

* USS Saratoga: Salvage efforts were prevented by radioactivity, and seven and one-half hours after the blast, with her funnel collapsed across her deck, Saratoga slipped beneath the surface of the lagoon at Bikini Atoll.

Updated with a look at all the carriers...

H20Bubbles
June 4th, 2006, 02:04 PM
In recent years, the submerged wreck (the Saratoga), the top of which is only 40 ft below the surface, has become a scuba diving destination, one of only two (the other being USS Oriskany) carrier wrecks accessible to recreational divers.

lamont
June 4th, 2006, 02:09 PM
There's a british carrier in around 500 fsw.

EDIT: HMS Dasher, 428 fsw -- http://www.johnsteele.free-online.co.uk/dasher.htm

mike_s
June 4th, 2006, 02:19 PM
Per Wikiepedia, the following US Aircraft Carriers have been sunk through acts of war.

* USS Hornet: American aircraft carrier sunk on 27 October 1942 by aircraft during the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands.
* USS Lexington: American aircraft carrier sunk on 8 May 1942 by carrier aircraft during the Battle of the Coral Sea.
* USS Princeton: American aircraft carrier sunk on 24 October 1944 by carrier based aircraft durnig the Battle of Leyte Gulf.
* USS Wasp: American aircraft carrier sunk on 15 September 1942 by Japanese submarine I-19 while escorting transports to Guadalcanal.
* USS Yorktown: American aircraft carrier sunk on 7 June 1942 by carrier-based aircraft during the Battle of Midway.

Have not yet been able to find any others that were sunk intentionally.


All the above aircraft carriers were sunk intenionally, by the Japanese.

The USS Saratoga (CV-3) was sunk intentionally by the US in Bikini Atoll by the "Baker" blast after WWII.

Note: To avoid peoples confusion, many of the above Navy ship names have had mutiple ships by the same name. For example there have been 7 or 8 different USS Hornets. The latest one (CV-12) is a museum that you can tour in Alameda CA. There were also several Saratogas and several Wasps, etc.

ScottB
June 4th, 2006, 02:31 PM
No idea if any of these are diveable..

Derived from http://members.tripod.com/~ffhiker/index-7.html

USS LANGLEY (CV-1) - Sunk February 22, 1942
She was sunk 75 miles off of Tjilapjap, Java. Three waves of Japanese aircraft attacked her. She was struck by 5 bomb hits, and took a 10 degree list. She was abandoned due to her desparate situation and she was sunk by U.S. destroyers that sent her to the bottom with guns and torpedoes.

USS LISCOMB BAY (CVE-56) - Sunk November 24, 1943. Torpedoed off of the Gilbert Islands. At 5 A.M. two torpedoes struck almost simultaneously. At least one hit in or near the bomb stowage compartment and this meant that every bomb there exploded simultaneously.

USS BLOCK ISLAND (CVE-21) - Sunk May 29, 1944. Torpedoed off of the Canary Islands by a German Submarine.

USS GAMBIER BAY (CVE-73) - Sunk October 25, 1944. Sunk by naval gunfire off of the Philippines during the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

USS ST LO (CVE-63) - Sunk October 25, 1944. Bombed during the Battle of Leyte Gulf off of Samar Island, Philippines.

USS OMMANEY BAY (CVE-79) - Sunk January 4, 1945. Sunk by a Kamikaze off of Mindoro, Philippines.

USS BISMARK SEA (CVE-95) - Sunk February 21, 1945. Struck by two Kamikazis off of Iwo Jima. The planes set off uncontrollable fires and exploding ammunition. Due to the great explosions the ship was abandoned and sank beneath the waves in 90 minutes with the loss of 318 men.



Derived from search of ibiblio.com for sunk: carrier
Definately not all inclusive

May 7th, 1942
Japanese naval vessel sunk:
Carrier SHOHO, by carrier-based aircraft, Battle of the
Coral Sea,
10 d. 29' S., 152 d. 55' E.

June 4th, 1942
Japanese naval vessels sunk:
Carrier KAGA, by carrier-based aircraft,
Battle of Midway,
30 d. 23' N., 177 d. 01' W.
Carrier SORYU, by carrier-based aircraft and submarine
NAUTILUS (SS-168), Battle of Midway,
30 d. 42' N., 179 d. 37' W.

June 19, 1944
Japanese naval vessels sunk:
Carrier SHOKAKU, by submarine CAVALLA (SS-244),
Battle of the Philippine Sea,
11 d. 50' N., 137 d. 57' E.
Carrier TAIHO, by submarine ALBACORE (SS-218),
Battle of the Philippine Sea,
12 d. 22' N., 137 d. 04' E.

June 20, 1944
Japanese naval vessel sunk:
Carrier HIYO, by carrier-based aircraft, Battle of
the Philippine Sea.
No coordinates

August 18,1944
Japanese naval vessel sunk:
Escort carrier ORAKA, by submarine RASHER (SS-269), off
northwestern Luzon, P. I.,
18 d. 16'N., 120 d. 20'E.

Ok,.. I'm tired of looking these up... have a great afternoon

-Scott

ScottB
June 4th, 2006, 02:37 PM
Here is a link to a SB thread about a diveable British carrier near Sri Lanka
http://74.52.40.173/showthread.php?t=39404

diverdan214
June 4th, 2006, 03:02 PM
I doubt this is one of the two they're refering to but:


the Campania

Built for Cunard Lines, she was launched on 8 September 1892. Her maiden voyage to New York began in Liverpool on 22 April 1893; a month later, her second roundtrip to New York resulted in Campania’s first Blue Riband, and her only eastbound record. Campania would twice set westbound records – in June 1893 and August 1894. A testament to her strength and speed.

Taken over by the Royal Navy during WW1 she was converted into an aircraft carrier, becoming the first Navy vessel to launch aircraft whilst underway.

http://www.divebunker.co.uk/dive_site_pages/hms_campania.htm

mike_s
June 4th, 2006, 03:09 PM
If you want some cool navy ships to dive on, head to "Scapa Flow" Scotland and you can dive the WWI German fleet. This was where it was taken after the surrender of Germany after WWI. In order to keep the fleet out of the British/allied hands, the Germans scuttled the ships after they got there all in one day. Many are diveable, if you like cold water.

del_mo
June 4th, 2006, 07:41 PM
But didn't the battleships all turtle? I read that it isn't quite like how it sounds.

diverdan214
June 5th, 2006, 09:48 AM
All but 8 of the German fleet have been salvaged, although there's still a ton of others up there as it was the main base of the Royal Navy through both World Wars. I've heard different reports about it and will be up there in July to find out first hand. None of them are aircraft carriers though, which is what I thought the thread was about.

Vie
June 6th, 2006, 12:55 AM
So where are the other two aircraft carriers? Any what difficulties are there in diving these other ships?

USS Saratoga (CV-3) - Bikini Atoll.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Saratoga_%28CV-3%29

http://www.bikiniatoll.com/divetour1.html

HMS Hermes - Sri Lanka.

"The ninth Hermes was the first purpose built fleet aircraft carrier in the world to be launched (11 September 1919)... She served in World War II and was sunk [during a] Japanese air attack on 9 April 1942." This is not the same carrier [R12] that served in the Falklands War and was then sold to the Indian Navy and recommissioned as INS Viraat). Due to political situation in Sri Lanka, trips may be difficult to arrange...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Hermes_%2895%29

"The ship lies on her port side and is reached at a depth of 44m with a seabed at 55m. You can swim the length of the ship from bow to stern, offering some very inviting penetration. The bow guns and those turrets amidships are still trained skyward and shell casings are still strewn around from her final frantic moments, multiple points of entry for at least superficial, and probably substantial, penetration exist. The Hermes was approximately 20m in the beam at the flight deck, and her present vertical relief points toward the wreck being partially buried in the seabed, and thus we expect depths on the interior of the ship to exceed the 53m. Beyond the intrigue of the wrecks interior, the lack of fishing net and diver interaction has lead to large marine life on the site that is both prolific and inquisitive."

http://www.southerncrossdivers.com.au/dive-trips/index.jsp?a=1124324288

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