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flofish94
September 14th, 2010, 02:40 PM
Hi everyone, I need some advice.

I have a 1st stage Aqualung Legend regulator with a second stage and an octopus attatched. I would like to replace the octopus with a newer one that I recently purchased. What tool do I need to remove the older octopus, take it out then put on the newer one. Can I do this at home or do I have to bring them to the shop. I don't want pay $80.00 for something simple that I can do at home but the shop would do the same and charge me an arm and leg for it.

Thanks.

Bappelt
September 14th, 2010, 02:43 PM
You should just need a crescent wrench to loosen the hose from the octo into the first stage and then un-screw it by hand and put the new one in finger tight plus a little.

DaMaDo
September 14th, 2010, 03:01 PM
Yeah crescent wrench, and there are threads here telling you how tight to make it. From what I've been reading, it's finger tight and then a slight tug with the wrench. Too tight will hurt it...you want the o-ring to seal, not the metal.

Bubbletrubble
September 14th, 2010, 03:09 PM
If you bought the new octo at a local dive shop, someone at the shop should be willing to swap it out with your old one for free. This should be considered one of the customer service perks of buying dive gear locally. If the shop insists on charging for such a service, then I would never patronize that shop again.

If you bought the new octo online, then obviously a local dive shop that didn't sell you the gear is under no obligation to provide you with free installation service.

I'm assuming that your new octo already has a low pressure reg hose attached to it. This simplifies installation.

Yes, you can do this installation at home with an appropriately sized wrench (or a good-quality adjustable). If the previous octo was installed correctly, it should take very little effort to unscrew the hose. Use a wrench to loosen it and then unscrew it the rest of the way by hand. Take the new octo + hose. Make sure that the appropriately sized o-ring is on the first stage end of the hose. Some people advocate lubing the o-ring with the right kind of silicone grease or spit. Others don't even bother lubricating it. Screw the end into the first stage hand-tight. Snug it up a little with your wrench. That's it. Don't over-tighten the union.

Hatul
September 14th, 2010, 05:16 PM
This is something that is better done by you rather than the shop IMO. Just follow the advice given above. You should be able to swap out hoses and regulators yourself.

Adam

cmburch
September 14th, 2010, 05:23 PM
I use a flared nut wrench to prevent marred fittings versus a crescent wrench.
Search results for: 'flared wrench' (http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result/?category=&q=flared+wrench)

They may be too fat in some instances, so I would just use the correct size combination wrench rather than a crescent wrench.

DivingCRNA
September 14th, 2010, 05:41 PM
Never change your own hoses, unless you have the skills necessary to change a light bulb!

Righty tighty. LEfty Loosey.

couv
September 14th, 2010, 05:54 PM
If you bought the new octo at a local dive shop, someone at the shop should be willing to swap it out with your old one for free. This should be considered one of the customer service perks of buying dive gear locally. If the shop insists on charging for such a service, then I would never patronize that shop again.

If you bought the new octo online, then obviously a local dive shop that didn't sell you the gear is under no obligation to provide you with free installation service.

I'm assuming that your new octo already has a low pressure reg hose attached to it. This simplifies installation.

Yes, you can do this installation at home with an appropriately sized wrench (or a good-quality adjustable). If the previous octo was installed correctly, it should take very little effort to unscrew the hose. Use a wrench to loosen it and then unscrew it the rest of the way by hand. Take the new octo + hose. Make sure that the appropriately sized o-ring is on the first stage end of the hose. Some people advocate lubing the o-ring with the right kind of silicone grease or spit. Others don't even bother lubricating it. Screw the end into the first stage hand-tight. Snug it up a little with your wrench. That's it. Don't over-tighten the union.

Excellent advice here; but if you are just replacing the second stage and not the hose, please remember to use a backup wrench. NEVER just un-torque or re-torque a hose end to a plastic second stage or hp gauge without using a backup wrench. Rather than me attempting to explain it, have a look at a manual at this site, quickly read thru and look at the pictures and diagrams and you will get the idea. Dive Rite RG1200 Regulator Manual - Page %CURPAGENUM% of %LASTPAGENUM% (http://www.scubatoys.com/servicemanuals/diverite/rg1200/rg1200index.html)

Scroll down to page 24 for a picture of someone using a backup wrench on a plastic second stage.


Couv

flofish94
September 14th, 2010, 06:31 PM
Thanks everyone for your advice and comments. I will follow your advice and do it myself. This board is great. Cheers!

Andyblue
September 14th, 2010, 06:34 PM
Righty tighty. LEfty Loosey.

Unless it's upside down :)

Never ever by any circumstaces use an adjustible wrench. They are used by butchers and hacks. Some mining sites and oil rigs go as far as banning these items on site due to the damage they cause. Don't be lazy and get a spanner the correct size.

Bubbletrubble
September 14th, 2010, 06:58 PM
Never ever by any circumstaces use an adjustible wrench. They are used by butchers and hacks. Some mining sites and oil rigs go as far as banning these items on site due to the damage they cause. Don't be lazy and get a spanner the correct size.
I keep at least one quality-made adjustable wrench in my save-a-dive kit...in addition to several other wrenches of various sizes. I have used the adjustable wrench on several occasions to help people fix their regs. This probably makes me a "hack" in your opinion, but I think I take pretty good care of my regs.

I have yet to see a butcher use an adjustable wrench. Maybe the butcher is trying to fix something in his kitchen? ;)

Andyblue
September 14th, 2010, 08:25 PM
I keep at least one quality-made adjustable wrench in my save-a-dive kit...in addition to several other wrenches of various sizes. I have used the adjustable wrench on several occasions to help people fix their regs. This probably makes me a "hack" in your opinion, but I think I take pretty good care of my regs.

I have yet to see a butcher use an adjustable wrench. Maybe the butcher is trying to fix something in his kitchen? ;)

Yes in my oppinion that does make you a hack. My oppinion is from an engineering point if view and if you had knowledge in the same field and were properly trained you would have that oppinion too. Adjustable wrench AKA 'nut f@cker' are tools for plumbers and electricians. Not for fitting. Use the correct tool for the job or don't do it. That is what I was taught. The same people that use shifters are the type of people that use loctite products where they should not be used. Belive me, I spend a good portion of my time fixing other peoples mistakes.

Butcher is a term used for someone that not only cuts meat into delectable cuts but also someone in the mechanical fitting trade who likes to use the wrong tools and cuts into or rounds off nuts - bolts, use wrong speeds on mills / lathers destroys cutting tools... And so on.

Op Perhaps you could just keep a few spanners of the correct sizes that you need for your equipment in your save a dive kit. There are not that many needed sizes as most sizes are standard.

Also Im guessing the op is not going to be doing this task on a boat with his emergency dive kit, so my advice was directed towards having a useable home toolkit. My advice is correct and there is no argument towards using a shifter over a proper sized spanner in your home.

You can do as you please with your own equipment, by all means use a shifter. But it still makes you a lazy hack if you could have used the proper tool. This is all my honest oppinion. :)

scoobydrew
September 15th, 2010, 12:04 AM
The only thing that I would add to the previous listings is that depending on the history of the new octo, when it is attached you may find it either stiff to breath from or it freeflows. If this is the case then it just needs a very simple little adjustment, put a note up to that effect and I'm sure someone on the board will advise how to adjust the octo accordingly.

Further to this if you can get you hands on some basic silicone grease then it is always worth putting some on the metal threads before you screw them back in, it helps protect them from corrosion and will make it easier to remove in the future

cmburch
September 15th, 2010, 12:13 AM
Carefully done an adjustable wrench will work with no or minimal marring rounding of corners on the fitting.

I prefer the flare nut wrench, but it may not work sometimes because it is thick and the distance first stage and hose crimp. This tool or a combination wrench will minimize any possible damage. These tools are used by plumbers, auto mechanics, etc.

The o-ring protects threads. I would not use silicon grease on threads. I use an oxygen compatible lube specific for Regs, but not necessarily for this o-ring.

Bubbletrubble
September 15th, 2010, 12:18 AM
Yes in my oppinion that does make you a hack. My oppinion is from an engineering point if view and if you had knowledge in the same field and were properly trained you would have that oppinion too. Adjustable wrench AKA 'nut f@cker' are tools for plumbers and electricians. Not for fitting. Use the correct tool for the job or don't do it. That is what I was taught. The same people that use shifters are the type of people that use loctite products where they should not be used. Belive me, I spend a good portion of my time fixing other peoples mistakes.

Butcher is a term used for someone that not only cuts meat into delectable cuts but also someone in the mechanical fitting trade who likes to use the wrong tools and cuts into or rounds off nuts - bolts, use wrong speeds on mills / lathers destroys cutting tools... And so on.

Op Perhaps you could just keep a few spanners of the correct sizes that you need for your equipment in your save a dive kit. There are not that many needed sizes as most sizes are standard.

Also Im guessing the op is not going to be doing this task on a boat with his emergency dive kit, so my advice was directed towards having a useable home toolkit. My advice is correct and there is no argument towards using a shifter over a proper sized spanner in your home.

You can do as you please with your own equipment, by all means use a shifter. But it still makes you a lazy hack if you could have used the proper tool. This is all my honest oppinion. :)
@Andyblue: Honestly, I could care less what you do for a living. The tangential rant on using the right tool for the job is a little over the top. Let's get some perspective on this...the OP asked about swapping out an octopus.

On a related note, do you even work on your own regs? If you don't, then I'd really try to limit the name-calling. Others might not be willing to put up with it.

There's is absolutely nothing wrong with using an adjustable wrench to install a hose or two.

vladimir
September 15th, 2010, 12:34 AM
Never ever by any circumstaces use an adjustible wrench. They are used by butchers and hacks. Some mining sites and oil rigs go as far as banning these items on site due to the damage they cause. Don't be lazy and get a spanner the correct size.I don't usually have a spanner handy; how about the mini-pliers that are 1/16 of the tools on my Swiss Army knife? If I tap them with a rock I can get them to grab the fitting nicely. Or are they also not recommended?

Andyblue
September 15th, 2010, 12:43 AM
I don't usually have a spanner handy; how about the mini-pliers that are 1/16 of the tools on my Swiss Army knife? If I tap them with a rock I can get them to grab the fitting nicely.

Ha ha ha ha.... Why yeees that should do nicely.

Stu S.
September 15th, 2010, 01:38 AM
When you buy an octopus there is often a slight amount of lubricant applied to the o-ring. If none is there it will feel dry and you will need some. The correct lubricant is called Christo Lube and a tiny dab is all it takes. Don't use anything else. Any dive shop should have it. That's a reason to get a shop to help you.

Need tools? You can take that octo down to your local Sears or hardware store and the helpful man will have a correct wrench to fit it. My regulator set is Italian and takes metric sizes, yours may be different. A quality tool that's cared for will last you a lifetime.

couv
September 15th, 2010, 08:06 AM
I don't usually have a spanner handy; how about the mini-pliers that are 1/16 of the tools on my Swiss Army knife? If I tap them with a rock I can get them to grab the fitting nicely. Or are they also not recommended?

Certainly for field work, but at home I find a cold chisel and a ball peen hammer the tools of choice regardless of the job. ;)

Downing
September 15th, 2010, 01:47 PM
Two words: duct tape. :D


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