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vfa
October 4th, 2003, 09:43 PM
i heard that the best way to defog a mask is to brun the inside lens. (apparently it burns all the crud away) i did this. besides i smelling a little burnt for the first time, it didnt fog up on me in neither salt nor fresh water

Dryglove
October 4th, 2003, 09:47 PM
vfa once bubbled...
i heard that the best way to defog a mask is to brun the inside lens. (apparently it burns all the crud away) i did this. besides i smelling a little burnt for the first time, it didnt fog up on me in neither salt nor fresh water

Ill stick to the toothpaste method. I dont think i could take a lighter to a brand new mask.

Jambi
October 4th, 2003, 10:48 PM
:flame:

For what masks cost I would be too scared that I would catch my mask on fire or myself on fire for that matter. BTW what did you use to burn the inside of the mask? How many dives do you have on it? I would be interested to know how such a treatment holds up, if only to know. For now I'll stick with the "Minty Fresh" method.


Jambi

vfa
October 11th, 2003, 10:40 PM
btw that was my 15 year old son, also my dive buddy experimenting!

"thank you for your support"
bartles and james


V

Axeman
October 14th, 2003, 03:33 PM
stick to sea gold.... lighters are scarry... :)

pescador775
October 18th, 2003, 08:01 PM
Every new mask has some evil stuff adhering to the lens. Don't know what it is but toothpaste, detergent, potato peel, tobacco juice, Windex, spit and/or Ensolv won't dent it. My last new mask required 7 cleanings with most of that stuff before it became fog resistant. No single brew worked and the improvement was gradual. What is this 'gold' stuff? Flaming it? Never occurred to me but the stuff on the lens is probably a hydrocarbon; yet, Ensolv a powerful degreaser certified for O2 equipment use, would not do it.

waterwraith
October 18th, 2003, 10:54 PM
All wal-mart vision centers carry this eye glass cleaner (free refills) that comes with a microfilm cloth. I recently used this on my new mask after I had washed it seven times with toothpaste. This stuff worked great and I have not had the mask fog up since. The stuff is also great for cleaning the mask of any crud that gets on the lenses.

waterwraith
October 18th, 2003, 10:56 PM
All wal-mart vision centers carry this eye glass cleaner (free refills) that comes with a microfilm cloth. I recently used this on my new mask after I had washed it seven times with toothpaste and still it fogged. This stuff worked great and I have not had the mask fog up since. The stuff is also great for cleaning the mask of any crud that gets on the lenses.

GotAir
October 19th, 2003, 05:09 PM
I was going to post my own thread about this topic but just decided to add to this one. my new mask is driving me Nutz i cant go one minute without defogging my mask under water and it really takes a lot of time out of the dive doing this every minute or so. i thought maybe my body temp is so high that the cooler water outside my mask was causing this. of course I'm using defogger solution before every dive but no differance. then i thought that maybe my new mask was to close to my face and maybe i need to get a bigger mask like one of those round ones ?. I have cleaned my mask with cleaner, but never used toothpaste or burning it( I just dont know if i want to put flames to my new 89.00 mask) does anybody have a sure fire cure for this problem (maybe i shouldnt use the word FIRE here) ?

Charlie99
October 19th, 2003, 05:17 PM
GotAir once bubbled...
my new mask is driving me Nutz i cant go one minute without defogging my mask under water and it really takes a lot of time out of the dive doing this every minute or so.

. I have cleaned my mask with cleaner, but never used toothpaste ........ ? Ummmmm. Why don't you try cleaning it with toothpaste? That's pretty much the standard advice for getting rid of the mold release coatings or whatever it is that makes new masks fog so readily.

If you have some sort of conscientious objection to toothpaste, then try a 50/50 mixture of alcohol and J&J baby shampoo.

DandyDon
October 19th, 2003, 05:45 PM
I was going to Pm you about this thread, but I see you already found it.

I think that the recommended toothpaste cleaner is Gel. :brushteet:

don

GotAir
October 19th, 2003, 06:14 PM
From an annomous PM
not all toothpastes are the same. and, the one you want to clean your mask is.....the one color regular toothpast.

not the jells....not the combo white reds....just the plain old style.

once you have done that realllllly well.....then get a small squirt bottle you can take with you with your gear and put a nice squirt of johnsons baby no tears shampoo in there and mix with water. once you have it mixed up...(and your mask all cleaned off and dryed...) squirt some of the mixture in the mask ...enough where it pools and covers the glass completly. and swish around....leave in for about an hour....pour the rest out and let dry. DO NOT WIPE THE EXCESS OUT....LET IT DRY.

then on your next dive....squirt a little of your mixture in there...swish around...pour out.....put on mask....and it wont fog.

ifffffffffffffffffff it does fog...it is because your face is really warm compared to the cold water. douse your face first...then put mask on....or more practically....put mask on....jump in off boat....lift mask and wet face to cool skin....put mask back on...youre in good shape now.
Thanks annomous PM. hope you dont mind me using your confidential notes to share with everyone. Don if your using Gel you might be having a fogging problem still:D

DandyDon
October 20th, 2003, 07:21 PM
I knew that I'd read something on this, and I thought it was on "Rodales Scuba Diving" magazine, but when I searched their web site, I couldn't find it. I called the editor today, and he explained that it publsihed before they started loaing article in their site. :huh:

Anway, he was nice enough to look for it and email it to me a couple of hours later. Since it's not available on their site, I'll just offer the entire piece with the editors notes. Rodale is not an authority, but a source of interest. I'm going to stick some notes in, too - (like this)


---------------------------

Here's the text of the mask-defogger review from the November 2001 issue of Rodale's Scuba Diving. You'll find toothpaste mentioned in the last sentence of the "How We Tested" section. I hope that helps you out.

Buck Butler
Rodale's Scuba Diving

----------------

GEAR BAG
9 Mask Defoggers
An unclouded look, plus some thoughts on toothpaste.
By John Francis

We first tested mask defoggers five years ago, and since then almost every one of the defoggers we tested has disappeared from the market. (Not our fault! Honest!) Only two remain, 500 psi and AquaSeal Sea Drops, and the latter is reformulated (and now called Super Sea Drops.) But the key question remains: Are they better than spit? We decided to find out.

How We Tested
With a permanent marker, we divided two eight-inch by 13-inch mirrors into six test squares, each about the size of a mask lens. Mirrors were cleaned, dipped in sea water and subjected to steam to establish a baseline propensity for fogging. After recleaning and a thorough drying, mask defoggers were applied to each square, closely following manufacturers’ application/rinse instructions. Along with the nine official defogs we added two common substitutes: toothpaste and spit. We left the remaining square clean as a control. From there we embarked on a series of steam/rinse cycles. Mirrors were dipped in sea water, simulating the inevitable dunking on any dive, then subjected to steam. Mirrors were rotated to achieve even coverage for two minutes, or until a test square fogged. Results were recorded, mirrors were set out in fresh air to dry for 30 minutes (to simulate a surface interval), then the cycle was repeated. It took nine cycles, over a period of four and a half hours, for all defoggers to fail. Defoggers were then applied to four dive masks and observed for fogging.

Almost all the defoggers we tested ranged in performance from adequate to outstanding. Two, however, weren’t able to outperform spit. The top scorer and a Tester’s Choice, for delivering exceptional defog performance at a moderate price is AquaSeal’s Sea Gold Anti-Fog Gel which survived nine full steam cycles as well as mask tests, outlasting all comers. The big surprise, and clearly our Best Buy, for delivering moderate defog performance at an outstanding price, is Crest’s Cool Mint Gel toothpaste, outperforming half the official defoggers tested at a fraction of the cost. (D: This is where I got the idea that gel was the best toothpaste, but maybe it's not the bet for new mask breakin?)

sidebar
How To Use a Mask Defogger
• Follow application instructions. This is critical to the performance
of defoggers. Some defogs require lenses to be dry before application; others need to be buffed with a dry cloth before getting wet. The better you prep the mask, the better your defog will behave. (Some instructions ask you to apply to both sides of the lens. Do it on ski goggles, but dive masks need it only on the inside, obviously.)
• Use sparingly. Defoggers are not only insanely expensive, they are also highly concentrated. The tendency is to squeeze too much. A couple of drops will do.
• Don’t touch! During surface intervals, lenses tend to cloud as they dry, which makes you want to either clean the lenses or apply more defog. Don’t do either. When you’re ready to dive, just dip the mask and the lenses will clear right up. By leaving the lenses alone between dives you’ll extend the working life of the defog.

500 PSI MASK DEFOG
Rating: 4 stars
One of the top finishers five years ago, this defogger was also a top finisher in these tests. The bluish gel is similar to toothpaste and is designed to be applied either wet or dry. It’s thick stuff and takes some rubbing to work it in, so you have to be a little more liberal in how much you use. The bottle has a rocker-type cap—you won’t have to unscrew it, only to lose it overboard. Apply with fingers only, then give it a good rinse. No apparent eye sting. Among the more economical defoggers tested. Tester’s Choice.
STATS
Price: $6.95 (two ounces). Application: Wet or dry lens; inside
only.
Dispenser: Squeeze bottle, rocker-type top. Contact: 500PSI, (719) 637-8686. E-mail: defog@iex.net.

AQUASEAL SEA GOLD ANTI-FOG GEL
Rating: 5 stars
A clear winner and Tester’s Choice. Outperformed all comers in both steam tests and mask evaluations. The clear glycerine-like stuff applies easily and doesn’t load up on the glass. Comes with a flip-up top that stays with the bottle for easy one-handed application. You don’t need more than a drop per application; a little goes a long way. Rub in aggressively, rinse twice and you’re ready to go. Safe on all glass and plastic mask lenses. Falls about mid-range on the defogger price scale. Tester’s Choice. (D: They're serious about rinsing twice. I used this once and didn't rinse. Made my eyes sting horribly!)
STATS
Price: $5 (one-and-a-quarter ounces). Application: Dry lens. Dispenser: Squeeze bottle, attached pop-up lid cap.
Contact: McNett Corp. (360) 671-2227. Web: www.mcnett.com.

AQUASEAL SUPER SEA DROPS ANTIFOG & CLEANER
Rating: 2 stars
A clear glycerine-like goo with a higher viscosity than most defogs. Among the easiest defoggers to apply, as well as one of the least expensive. Also one of the least effective, performing only one steam cycle better than spit. The squeeze bottle has an attached cap for easy application. Safe for all plastic lenses and both silicone and rubber mask frames, but can be an eye irritant.
STATS
Price: $4 (one-and-a-quarter ounces). Application: Dry lens. Dispenser: Squeeze bottle, attached pop-off lid cap.
Contact: McNett Corp. (360) 671-2227. Web: www.mcnett.com.

AQUASEAL SUPER SEA DROPS ANTIFOG & CLEANER WITH APPLICATOR
Rating: 3 stars
A good value; the least expensive mask defogger tested (not counting toothpaste), offering moderate performance. The manufacturer claims fingers caked with food and sunblock are a common cause of lens contamination, which is why they supply an applicator. Tests seem to support their contention; this defog performed quite a bit better than its Super Sea Drops cousin without an applicator. The downside is, with the applicator it’s difficult to control the amount of defogger dispensed, and without a cap to cover the dampened brush, it has a tendency to make a mess in your gear bag. Can be an eye irritant.
STATS
Price: $6 (two ounces). Application: Dry lens. Dispenser: Squeeze bottle with built-in brush. Contact: McNett Corp. (360) 671-2227. Web: www.mcnett.com.

BODY GLOVE MASK DEFOG
Rating: 4 stars
A rocker-type bottle lid allows one-hand dispensing for above-average defog performance. Although the toothpaste-like gel is tougher to rub into a lens than most defogs—which compels you to be liberal in your application—it rated among the top finishers in both steam cycles and mask dousings. Apply using fingers only to the inside of either a wet or a dry lens. Give it a good rinse. No apparent eye sting. One of the more economical defoggers tested.
STATS
Price: $6.99 (two ounces). Application: Wet or dry lens, inside only. Dispenser: Squeeze bottle, rocker-type top. Contact: Body Glove Intl., (310) 374-3441. Web: www.bodyglove.com.

INNOVATIVE DESIGNS ABSOLUTELY CLEAR
Rating: 2 stars
The only mask defog tested that does not come in a squeeze bottle. A cake of pink wax, similar in consistency to Chap Stick, this defog is more complicated to apply than most. Rub a little on your finger and then into the inside of a dry lens. After the defog dries, you need to buff the lens with a clean dry cloth. Packaged in a handy tub with an attached flip-top that won’t get away from you. Among the more expensive defoggers tested.
STATS
Price: $5.95 (one ounce). Application: Dry lens. Need to buff with
cloth. Dispenser: Plastic tub, attached flip-up lid.
Contact: Innovative Scuba Concepts (719) 637-8686.
E-mail: defog@iex.net.

S&S FUN STUFF 200 FT. VIZ MASK DEFOG
Rating: 4 stars
With the consistency of Dawn dish soap, this defogger costs almost $2 for a quarter-ounce, but the stuff really works. In all tests, it consistently ranked among the top four finishers. With a flip-up nozzle in the bottle cap, it dispenses easily but applies a little sticky to a dry mask; you don’t want to use too much. Rub into faceplate until dry, then rinse. Avoid touching the faceplate thereafter. Won’t burn your eyes.
STATS
Price: $7.95 (one ounce). Application: Dry lens, inside only. Dispenser: Squeeze bottle, pry-up nozzle in cap.
Contact: S&S Fun Stuff, Inc. (877) 627-5257.

TONN GT-49 STRAIGHT NO-FOG
Rating: 1 star
GT-49 earns the dubious distinction of being the most expensive mask defogger in this test group. But in spite of its dizzying price, in both steam cycles and mask tests, this glycerine-like defogger wasn’t able to perform any better than everyday spit. Instructions require you to apply it liberally: a couple drops for prep, then a couple more drops for actual defog protection. And if you think that’s annoying, just wait until the screw-off cap on the little squeeze bottle rolls off the dive boat bench and drops overboard.
STATS
Price: $4.95 (one-half ounce). Application: Dry lens. Dispenser: Squeeze bottle, unattached screw-off cap.
Contact: Tonn Ind., (888) 891-8668. (D: Why bother?)

TRIDENT INSTRUCTOR’S CHOICE TR-17 ANTI-FOG
Rating: 1 star
Having earned a spot as one of the three most expensive defoggers in this go-round, TR-17 doesn’t work as well as spit. It also smells like medicine and has a tendency to sting the eyes. If that weren’t enough aggravation, application requires both a dry lens and a clean buffing cloth, and then fresh water to rinse. Finally, it comes with a screw-off cap that is sure to find its way into the drink. Say no more, say no more.
STATS
Price: $6.95 (one ounce). Application: Dry lens. Buffing required.
Freshwater rinse. Dispenser: Squeeze bottle, unattached screw-off cap.
Contact: Trident Diving Equip. (818) 998-7518. (D: Why?)
Web: tridentdive.com.

SIDEBAR
A Magnetic Approach to Fog-Free Faceplates?
Rating: 2 stars
Yep. These are little half-inch magnets placed on the inside and outside of your lens, sandwiching the glass. With your index finger, you slide the outer magnet across the lens. The inner magnet gets dragged along, clearing mask fog as it goes.
Called Wide-i, the system does perform as advertised. The magnets don’t obstruct your view and they cling to each other tenaciously. Despite vigorous mask dunkings and thwacks against the hull of our boat, we couldn’t dislodge them. The only problem with this system is that it doesn’t actually eliminate mask fog; it only cleans up fog as it appears. To deal with fog, you can continually clear your mask with shots of sea water, you can constantly slide these magnets across your field of vision—or you can use defogger and prevent it. Wide-i states in its product literature that it is “intended to be a stand-alone device,” but elsewhere on the page states it’s “not intended to replace other defoggers, only improve on them.” We agree with the latter.
STATS
Price: $11.99 for one set of two pairs for dual lenses, or $6.99 for a single pair for a single lens.
Contact: Wide-i (877) 819-6674. Web: www.wide-i.com.

SIDEBAR
Why Do Masks Fog?
Dirt. Little specks of crud, droplets of sunscreen, nearly microscopic bits of sediment and sea life from the water—almost any contamination on the inside of the mask lens will invite fog. When the air inside your mask reaches nearly 100 percent humidity, the water vapor readily condenses around those tiny bits as droplets. You may have noticed that a dirty windshield fogs more than a clean one. Tiny nicks and imperfections in the surface of the glass itself also attract fog. So defogger works by cleaning the crud and filling the imperfections to leave a smoother surface, where moisture is more likely to sheet and less likely to fog.

No Fish
October 20th, 2003, 07:39 PM
I use the sea gold and love it. A little goes a long way. Also I really clean the glass every once in a while. I find the grey goop that Marine Sports Products sells is super. It is called Mask lens and slate cleaner. I think they are from Florida. Anyway it really works better than toothpaste. By cleaning and using the sea gold. I never fog up.

OK .....I know that since I said that, I will fog up next time........

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