PDA

View Full Version : pee valve during SI



gbray
August 13th, 2011, 12:13 PM
This may be a silly question but... I am trying to prepare for my ANDP class and may have to take it in cold water which means I will need to wear my drysuit. At the current time it does not have a pee valve installed so I am considering getting one. My question is how does one urinate while wearing the suit on SI without making a mess on the outside of the suit?:(

TSandM
August 13th, 2011, 12:29 PM
I generally, if shore diving, wade into the water to the depth of the valve and pee there. If boat diving, I hang my leg off the side of the boat. The Halcyon valve directs most of the urine away from the suit, and the little bit that does get on it is going to get washed off with the next dive.

DivemasterDennis
August 13th, 2011, 12:44 PM
You can't. To pee, take off the suit. That is the hygeneic and historic way to go. I confess that I have never observed a diver in a dry suit with a "pee valve." They all remove the suit for peeing. The valve strikes me as something that may leak or malfunction and that is not good for a dry suit. If this is an important issue for you, know that I regularly dive in water in the 55 to 65 degree range in a 7/5 mil wet suit with hood, and stay warm, and can pee in it in an emergency or any other time (in the water) for that matter.
DivemasterDennis

TSandM
August 13th, 2011, 01:26 PM
I confess that I have never observed a diver in a dry suit with a "pee valve."

Clearly.

P-valves work very well; they are no more prone to malfunction than inlet or exhaust valves, which we all have on our suits. If there is a popoff or disconnect within the suit, you turn the suit inside out and rinse it, and wash your undergarments. It has happened to everyone who uses a p-valve, I would be willing to bet, and it is of no more consequence than a small salt water leak. P-valves are a necessity for people doing extended range dives -- my cave dives in MX are now averaging 2 1/2 hours; I cannot stay warm in a wetsuit that long, nor can I hold my urine that long while diving, unless I'm severely volume depleted pre-dive.

boulderjohn
August 13th, 2011, 01:55 PM
I have been in a number of situations where I and others are on shore in remote areas. Most people wander off to a discreet spot and just let it go. Others don't bother with discretion all that much. Yes, it gets on the outside of the suit, but that will go away when you do your next dive. If you are not planning another dive, then take your suit off first.

g1138
August 13th, 2011, 02:17 PM
I don't know what's worse:
- Seeing a dry diver striking the Captain Morgan pose
Or
- Seeing a stream running out of a wet diver's booties.

spectrum
August 13th, 2011, 02:44 PM
Where talking about a sport where it's common t pee in one's wetsuit. For heaven's sake what's the todo about a little urine running down the outside leg of a drysuit? Often the need peaks as one rises to exit and the suit is shedding water to begin with. Latter in the surface interval follow whatever seems modest enough for the situation from nothing to going somewhere discrete. A splash of rinse water afterwards is always in good taste.

A properly installed relief valve does the drysuit no harm and may save it from hasty doffing stresses. Anyone diving dry without one is uncomfortable, dehydrated, has a mega bladder, or makes short dives, or some combination of the above.

In any case blurting out "hey it works" while gesturing to the trickle from your thigh is probably not the thing to do. :)

Pete

Jim Lapenta
August 13th, 2011, 05:57 PM
No it is not. Proper etiquette calls for informing those aound you that you need to pee. Then let it go and smile that big smile of relief while exclaiming loudly ----AHHHHH that feeeeels soooooo goood!

Or just calmly let it go and say nothing. Nobody cares as long as it's not in their house, trailer, or on their dog. Even though the dog may deserve it.

boulderjohn
August 13th, 2011, 06:10 PM
. Even though the dog may deserve it....and like it.

TSandM
August 13th, 2011, 06:15 PM
The best thing is to find some p-valveless diver who looks uncomfortable, and hang your leg over the boat right near them, exclaiming, "Oh, that feels SO much better." I almost killed Uncle Pug a few years back, for doing that :)

TMHeimer
August 13th, 2011, 07:43 PM
My post won't help, but I must reply. Wetsuit diver. Cold water-Spring--not so bad. Though less cold water late Fall, but frigid SIs! Lifelong bladder problem. Haven't peed the suit yet (really). Taking it partially off during a Nov. SI is murder--then doing dive #2. Limits my hydration before dives also. I take pills (timing them exactly before the dive). Have considered a pee valve for the wetsuit--whoa, too costly. Have also considered using a good old knife on the farmer john (wet suit, that is!). Man I love my shortie & body suit!

Hank658
August 13th, 2011, 09:56 PM
When my buddy goes "Captain" I know what's coming next. :cool2: I haven't got around to putting a valve in my suit yet, so I do the more usual "dance" post dive....

spectrum
August 13th, 2011, 10:15 PM
Have considered a pee valve for the wetsuit--whoa, too costly.

Just run a line down your leg and out at the boot.

Slamfire
August 13th, 2011, 10:20 PM
Anyone diving dry without one is uncomfortable, dehydrated, has a mega bladder, or makes short dives, or some combination of the above.You forgot to mention those who use Depends...
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51SRMTDDAEL._AA280_PIbundle-4,TopRight,0,0_AA280_SH20_.jpg


Proper etiquette calls for informing those around you that you need to pee. Then let it go and smile that big smile of relief while exclaiming loudly ----AHHHHH that feeeeels soooooo goood!On the topic of drysuit etiquette, I have a friend that confessed that he likes to age flatulence during the dive in hopes that it'll surprise his buddy when he asks him to unzip his back.

jar546
August 13th, 2011, 10:23 PM
Drysuit P Valves are the best thing since sliced bread. I am well hydrated now that I am not trying to cut back so I am uncomfortable. During SI, pee away discreetly. Wash off the suit at the end of the day. If on a boat, put a leg in or sit on the back of the stern.

Jim Lapenta
August 14th, 2011, 07:57 AM
You forgot to mention those who use Depends...
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51SRMTDDAEL._AA280_PIbundle-4,TopRight,0,0_AA280_SH20_.jpg

On the topic of drysuit etiquette, I have a friend that confessed that he likes to age flatulence during the dive in hopes that it'll surprise his buddy when he asks him to unzip his back.

Or ask them to "inspect" your exhaust valve!:D

couv
August 14th, 2011, 10:28 AM
It's been years since I've used a dry suit and the ones I used did not have a P valve. An old Moss Back gave me the helpful tip to use a long jar (olive jar) on SI. Pull one arm into the suit, pass the olive jar through the neck dam and take care of business. Carefully pass the olive jar back through the neck dam and pour the contents out.

But having read through these post, I think the valve is the way to go. ;)

c

Slamfire
August 14th, 2011, 11:25 AM
Ballsy move... I'd be so paranoid about over filling beyond the jar capacity.

spectrum
August 14th, 2011, 11:30 AM
It's been years since I've used a dry suit and the ones I used did not have a P valve. An old Moss Back gave me the helpful tip to use a long jar (olive jar) on SI. Pull one arm into the suit, pass the olive jar through the neck dam and take care of business. Carefully pass the olive jar back through the neck dam and pour the contents out.

But having read through these post, I think the valve is the way to go. ;)

c

The single serving (12oz?) Gatorade bottles work great for anytime you need to wee discretely after diving wet or dry.. Some sites don't lend themselves to a whiz in the bush but don't have facilities either.

boulderjohn
August 14th, 2011, 11:58 AM
Yes, while on the surface you can always find alternative means of elimination, and if that were the only thing we had to worry about, olive jars and the like would work very nicely.

When I first bought a wet suit, I listened to a veteran user who told me there was no reason to install a Pee valve. It was not too long before I realized that his recommendation was based on the fact that he himself never did long dives. (In fact, his SAC rate pretty much guaranteed it!) It was during one long, agonizing deco stop that I finally decided to get one installed, and I have never regretted it. Its use on the surface is a bonus; its use under the surface is a necessity.

BabyDuck
August 14th, 2011, 12:34 PM
when on the surface, prop your valve-side leg backwards on the toe - point your toe, and touch it to the ground 12-18in behind your other foot. that way most of the pee comes straight out the valve and you only get the last little drop that can drip down the suit. i usually lean against a tree to get an even better angle, but just cocking your foot back is usually enough.

ps - not cool to do this somewhere someone may walk, even if you're trying to show off. as larry says, 'with a weenis comes responsibility...'

Dsix36
August 14th, 2011, 01:00 PM
when on the surface, prop your valve-side leg backwards on the toe - point your toe, and touch it to the ground 12-18in behind your other foot. that way most of the pee comes straight out the valve and you only get the last little drop that can drip down the suit. i usually lean against a tree to get an even better angle, but just cocking your foot back is usually enough.

ps - not cool to do this somewhere someone may walk, even if you're trying to show off. as larry says, 'with a weenis comes responsibility...'

I am going to have a hard time getting that image of "you against a tree" out of my mind.

BabyDuck
August 15th, 2011, 10:07 AM
i'll let you watch for a small fee, don...insert your avatar's evil smirk here!


Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1