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freedc
October 6th, 2011, 08:14 PM
This is totally traumatic for me but I just came to the realization that after a lifetime of 20/20 vision and never having to worry about corrective lenses, I suddenly can't focus on stuff that's close to my face, like my freaking dive computer, air gauge, and compass! :cussing: I guess that comes with turning 43.

I'm just coming to grips with this, so maybe you older divers can tell me what I'm in for. Am I going to need bifocals? A special mask? Contact lenses for diving? What do other fogies do who can't read their dials but otherwise see fine?

fisheater
October 6th, 2011, 08:23 PM
Two things to do: One, the other or both.

Prescription lenses in the mask. (Could be drop in replacements or glued on special grinds.)

Stick on "gauge readers." I use the DiveOptx brand. (The stick super well or not worth crap, depending upon how carefully you follow directions. Be very sure you use non-oil detergent to clean your mask, lenses and hands. That's key.)

(I HATE anything touching or about to touch my eyeballs. So contacts are out for me. Not to mention problems with flooded, kicked off masks.)

I feel your pain. Eagle vision gone forever. I miss it, too.


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ScubaSteve1962
October 6th, 2011, 10:10 PM
The look2 by Aqualung has lenses that could be replaced with Rx lenses. There are probably others out there.

fisheater
October 6th, 2011, 10:13 PM
Lots!


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phillybob
October 6th, 2011, 10:36 PM
Cressi Corrective Lens for Big Eyes Evolution Mask (http://www.leisurepro.com/Prod/CSBMLEV.html?Search=op%3dgcsSearch%26Term%3d%26Sea rchFlag%3dall%26AdvSrchSortField%3dStock%26DescSor t%3d0%26Description%3don%26Hit%3d1)


LP sells tons of replacement lenses with different strength diopters attached for all different makes of masks. I just put a Cressi up as an example. I replaced my Mares X-Visions left lens with a +2.5 diopter. Works great for reading gauges. Light years better than the plastic stick-on lenses. And about the same price. The diopter/lens is pro grade glass and it's permanently fussed to the lens. Very high quality that won't fall off. It takes about two minutes to swap out the lens yourself.

TMHeimer
October 6th, 2011, 11:09 PM
YES...43! That was 1997 for me and that's exactly when it happened. You can get inserts for the bottom of your mask that act as yes... READING GLASSES. I lost 2 by following directions and sticking them on with warm water, etc. Maybe a little glue is better. Or, if your up close vision isn't too bad, you can try highlighting stuff as I do on analog gauges. Or, some of the other ideas above. I had the lazer surgery just before getting certified in '05. I used to be able to see perfectly up close and all over underwater while snorkelling--the refraction of light water to mask air space corrected me. Now I see 20-20 with everything else, but not up close.

fnfalman
October 7th, 2011, 02:18 AM
Get gauges and computers with bigger displays.

Seriously.

I love my Wisdom 2 computer because of the big numbers.

knowone
October 7th, 2011, 03:26 AM
My 16" monitor lives 6' from my
head

Vision improves post cigarette apocalypto

Searcaigh
October 7th, 2011, 03:51 AM
At 58 I need +1.5 for reading, so far underwater I can still read my gauges and dive computer, but I know that day is coming soon

TartanFrog
October 7th, 2011, 06:55 AM
I use +1.5 reading glasses for normal stuff above water. In water I can read most things on my Atomic Cobalt without too much difficulty except the things that are in smaller characters such as gas time remaining bottom time etc. I've tried the stick on version of the readers but I could not get them to stay in the position I needed them.

I am probably going to have custom lenses made with readers in the lower section. Pain in the neck, but it would also help seeing the details on my camera.

DiveMaven
October 7th, 2011, 08:14 AM
I have the same problem. XS Scuba makes a Look Down Reader Mask where the bottom of the lens is angled and 1.75+ strength. I find it perfect for reading my computer and since it's angled it doesn't interfere with looking straight ahead.

I tried the stick in lenses and they wouldn't stick. When I got some hydrophobic tape and glued them on, I realized that they're a bit smaller than I wanted since I didn't feel like I could just glance down like I can with the Reader mask.

If you need more magnification, Scuba.com also has a bunch of masks you can order with bifocals in many different strengths.

Jeff Pack
October 7th, 2011, 08:48 AM
Keep in mind, some people cant use bi-focals (like me for example). For some reason, probably because of all my martials arts training for peripheral vision , bifocals totally mess up my overall vision.

It was an odd discovery.

DivemasterDennis
October 7th, 2011, 11:36 AM
I too have had trouble with stick in lenses sticking in. I am a 58 year old tri-focal wearer, but I find that pop in pre-ground lenses work just fine, but I do have one custom ground bifocal mask, which cost several hundreds of dollars. The pop ins are a fraction of that price. I pop in a left lens that I can see close through, and pop in a right lens that gives me totally clear vision at distance. I learned that from people who have lazik surgery, where the procedure implements that plan, and it works great. I commend it to you.
DivemasterDennis

starrlamia
October 7th, 2011, 01:15 PM
i got pop in ones for my mask, not too pricey (100 CAD) and I love them! Im not opposed to contacts, Im just lazy and dont feel like wearing them :P

TomZ
October 7th, 2011, 03:45 PM
I ordered a mask from my LDS with corrective lenses, readers in the bottom of the mask. The correction is good, but.... I'm real sensitive to anything, ANYTHING just a little off in my glasses. The permanent readers are fine, but only one eye at a time. The lenses are much farther away than my actual PD (Pupil Distance) of 65mm. I can only focus through one or the other by looking slightly sideways through one lens or the other. I needed to order a real prescription mask for my very nearsighted wife. I researched this issue and ordered one from Prescription Dive Masks (http://rxdivemask.com/) I ordered one for myself, after speaking with the optician (who is a diver) about my concerns. I haven't received them yet, but many reviewers speak highly of his work.

scuba_shark_fart
October 7th, 2011, 04:46 PM
This is totally traumatic for me but I just came to the realization that after a lifetime of 20/20 vision and never having to worry about corrective lenses, I suddenly can't focus on stuff that's close to my face, like my freaking dive computer, air gauge, and compass! :cussing: I guess that comes with turning 43.

I'm just coming to grips with this, so maybe you older divers can tell me what I'm in for. Am I going to need bifocals? A special mask? Contact lenses for diving? What do other fogies do who can't read their dials but otherwise see fine?

I'm not the "fogie," but I do wear progressive/bifocals on a regular basis. Honestly, I've been fortunate enough to where I can see my computer underwater good enough to not need lenses in my mask yet. A few of my dive buddies tried to convince me to get em, but I know if I can see or not.
Anyhow, the water acts as a magnifier for me.
I have dove with contacts in the past and had no issues, although I've had friends who said they can't b/c of pressure changes on the eye causing eye shape to change slightly and the contacts can be irritating.
It's all personal preference, but I'd look into the expenses as well. Rx lenses can be quite expensive. Maybe DAN has an eye doc they recommend for something like this. One of your local shops may be more knowledgable as well.

oldogre
October 7th, 2011, 05:28 PM
I wear Bifocals & use OPTX stick-on lenses (+2.5), & so far (50 dives) no problems. For me they are essential.

Bob DBF
October 7th, 2011, 11:03 PM
Get gauges and computers with bigger displays.

Seriously.

I love my Wisdom 2 computer because of the big numbers.

A buddy of mine continues to use his Brick (Orca Edge) for that very reason.

I like analog gauges 'cause I can see the needle and know where the numbers should be. I also have the the stick on cheaters in case I actually have to read anything accuratly.


Bob
-----------------------------
I may be old, but Iím not dead yet.

craracer
October 8th, 2011, 12:31 AM
Anyone run across something that can be attached directly to a gauge face?

Culcuhain
October 8th, 2011, 09:21 AM
Prescription Diving Mask Lenses (http://www.seavisionusa.com/prescription-lenses.html)

They make gauge readers lens for their masks.

I have a SeaDive Mask and Mares X-Vision both with RX lens (no gauge readers since I am nearsighted and old)

TexasKaren68
October 8th, 2011, 02:12 PM
Another +1 for the DiveOptx lenses. They came in a set of two but I just use one, stuck to the inside of my left mask lens. Works perfectly for reading things close up and it hasn't come off while diving yet. It came loose once when someone other than myself put defogger in the mask and messed it up, but once I got it home and got everything cleaned, it stuck perfectly a second time and hasn't come off since.

Bonus - looking through that part of my mask makes the fish look much bigger :eyebrow:

Katie K
October 8th, 2011, 03:11 PM
Bare makes The Duo B mask and you can get corrective lenses for them for an affordable price... the mask are extremely comfortable... And you wont be paying hundreds for a reliable proscription mask.. The shop I work for sell the mask for $45CAN and $60 for a set of prescription lenses...


KT

craracer
October 8th, 2011, 04:02 PM
Thanks for the suggestion, but I would prefer something that I can stick directly to a gauge face, not inside my mask.:crafty:

phillybob
October 8th, 2011, 05:19 PM
Thanks for the suggestion, but I would prefer something that I can stick directly to a gauge face, not inside my mask.:crafty:




2 pcs Credit Card 3x Magnifier Magnifying Fresnel Lens | eBay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-pcs-Credit-Card-3x-Magnifier-Magnifying-Fresnel-Lens-/250904283046?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a6b0f87a6)

I'm sure you could somehow rig this up to your computer face. If you punch in 'Fresnel lens' into your search engine, millions of options come up. About $7 for two.

fisheater
October 8th, 2011, 06:10 PM
Curious as to whether these Frenzel lenses will work immersed in water


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phillybob
October 8th, 2011, 06:21 PM
Curious as to whether these Frenzel lenses will work immersed in water



They're cheap enough to do a little experimenting.

craracer
October 8th, 2011, 09:32 PM
Interesting. Now the question becomes "How do I affix them?".

If there is a good solution, which won't destroy the face of my SPG, I'll buy them for experimental purposes.

phillybob
October 8th, 2011, 10:39 PM
Interesting. Now the question becomes "How do I affix them?".

If there is a good solution, which won't destroy the face of my SPG, I'll buy them for experimental purposes.



Thin bungee cords ? Wire ties ?

craracer
October 9th, 2011, 12:41 AM
Like changing a wrist mount computer strap to bungee? Attach the Fresnel at four corners with bungee?

I wonder if that would cause the Fresnel to concave too much, if that makes sense? I'm not sure how flexible the stuff is?

RJP
October 9th, 2011, 08:04 AM
I used Optx 20/20 stick-in lenses purchased at Walgreens. They are the same as the DiveOptx lenses - I mean EXACTLY the same, made by the same company. But they sell for $7.99 instead of $30. They worked just fine for ~300 dives over three years or so.

That said, last year I went to contact lenses, mostly due to need to see dive and bicycle computers. Highly recommended.

RonFrank
October 10th, 2011, 07:21 PM
You instinctively want to fight your aging eyes but it is pointless.

Buy the magnifiers and move ahead with life. You will learn after sticking enough stuff on your lenses and having it fall off. You may be able to get away with buying a different computer with larger numbers, but at some point you will need reading glasses/magnifiers. I use one and stick it at the bottom of my right lens.

There are only two options and one of them is death...... :D

phillybob
October 10th, 2011, 07:36 PM
Mares Corrective Lenses Positive Bi-Focal Diopters for X-Vision & Liquidskin Masks (http://www.leisurepro.com/Prod/MRSXCLP.html?Search=op%3dgcsSearch%26Term%3d%26Sea rchFlag%3dall%26AdvSrchSortField%3dStock%26DescSor t%3d0%26Description%3don%26Hit%3d1)


Dude !! LISTEN TO ME !!! This is a no-brainer !! Get a mask that's compatible with the drop-in lenses !! You only need one. Don't fart around with the plastic stick on crap.:no:

caseywilson
October 11th, 2011, 03:59 PM
I go by a couple acronyms: OF [Old Fogie or Fart, take your pick] and GOG [Grumpy Old Geezer].

My vision problem is both near and far and for that reason I've been wearing bifocals for longer than..., nevermind. After fiddling around with various gizmos and gadgets, I sent my mask to the folks at Prescription Dive Masks (http://www.rxdivemask.com) along with a copy of my perscription, left and right. A couple weeks later my mask returned with perscription lenses custom fitted to MY mask.

The mask is superb! It wasn't cheap, but I'd pay it again without hesitation.

Dive Safe,

Casey OF,GOG

richsadams
October 11th, 2011, 03:59 PM
Cressi Corrective Lens for Big Eyes Evolution Mask (http://www.leisurepro.com/Prod/CSBMLEV.html?Search=op%3dgcsSearch%26Term%3d%26Sea rchFlag%3dall%26AdvSrchSortField%3dStock%26DescSor t%3d0%26Description%3don%26Hit%3d1)As my eyes get older (not me ;) ) I considered prescription mask inserts. However I used the Cressi lenses on our last dive in Cayman and they worked perfectly! You can get them in varying strengths just like reading glasses. They just stick to the inside of your mask with a bit of mask lens cleaning fluid and work as bifocals allowing you to look down and read your computer, etc. and then up for "normal" vision.

The bonus was being able to see very small creatures and other things very clearly up close as well!

Be aware that they can pop off when your mask dries out, so be careful not to lose them.

Our local dive shop had them in stock. Highly recommended.

Ronsch
October 11th, 2011, 04:17 PM
My two cents worth:

I've been using the DiveOptx for at least 10 years. I was in the same boat you are (pun intended). I had 20/20 vision until I turned 40 and then several years later gradually started having difficulty with the gauges and computer.

The issue with prescription lenses was that my prescription was changing noticeably every two years, sometimes every year. I couldn't see going to the expense of redoing the mask that often so I stuck(yet another pun) to the inserts and still have them today(today's are much stronger than the ones from ten years ago). I've never had any trouble getting them to stick even in the high-use environment of a live-aboard.

My prescription finally seems to have settled down so I will begin looking for prescription lenses in the near future.

eytokyo
October 11th, 2011, 04:47 PM
it's the pygmy seahorse in the coral that I lose when I am trying to focus my camera on it.... guess it's time for underwater lens on my mask... oh, the joy of aging! :cool2::cool2:

sibermike7
October 11th, 2011, 04:51 PM
Or you could just be a cheap rascal like me and bleed a little water into your water and look through it as you would bifocals! :D

thos
October 11th, 2011, 05:05 PM
I agree with Ronsch and many others, Dive Optx are the way to go.
First, don't replace a mask that fits well, just for the sake of reading lenses. That's trading one problem for another.
Second, your eyes will change over time, and you'll need stronger reading correction. Do you really want to pay a big expense repeatedly?
Third, Dive Optx work perfectly and they're not junk. The very first poster was right. Prepare your mask and install them exactly as the directions, and they'll never give you a problem. Mine have been in my Atomic mask for 6 years. Never a single problem, and a perfect view of my gauges.

jnowak100
October 11th, 2011, 05:21 PM
I bought prescription mask, bifocal lenses, from www.SeaVisionUSA.com thru my local dive shop. working with your prescription, they adjust for the mask distance and underwater magnification. I can see at a distance, as well as read my gauges and instructor dive slates. When you consider the price of a new pair of glasses, these were actually relatively inexpensive ~$200+

WyrdNet
October 11th, 2011, 05:36 PM
My first prescription mask had the corrective lenses glued in. This worked very well, until I flew with the mask in checked baggage. On landing, I found the original flat lense shattered. The corrective lenses were fine. The mask was in a hard plastic case that was undamaged. What I believe happened was that as the mask cooled or warmed in the cold airplane hold, the two glass parts shrank and expanded differentially, putting stress on them. Between the flat lense, the glue, and the corrective lenses, the flat lens lost. I could be wrong.

I found myself in Hawaii without a mask. Luckily at the time, the lady at the Navy dive shop sold me a much better mask, with corrective lenses, for $90! This mask has the corrective lenses "built-in", individually. I recently had a plastic buckle on it replaced by a local shop for free. Still going strong a decade later.

edbdiver
October 11th, 2011, 05:54 PM
:snorkel:I have just the opposite problem. I can see my guages fine, but I need corrective lenses for distance. I have glue-in half-lenses in my mask. That way I look through them for distance, but through the "flats" for close-up.:goingdown:

DavidnPeggy
October 11th, 2011, 05:59 PM
This is totally traumatic for me but I just came to the realization that after a lifetime of 20/20 vision and never having to worry about corrective lenses, I suddenly can't focus on stuff that's close to my face, like my freaking dive computer, air gauge, and compass! :cussing: I guess that comes with turning 43.

I'm just coming to grips with this, so maybe you older divers can tell me what I'm in for. Am I going to need bifocals? A special mask? Contact lenses for diving? What do other fogies do who can't read their dials but otherwise see fine?


I tried the stick on dive optic magnifiers and they just wash away when you flood your mask. I then went to a mono vision contact len. My left eye is the dominant eye so my reading contact goes in my right eye. This works great for me. When I am not diving I wear glasses the rest of the time. Good luck choosing the right path for you.

fisheater
October 11th, 2011, 06:27 PM
The key to getting the DiveOptx stick on lenses to stick is to use non-oily detergent to clean them, your mask and your hands. Then, follow the directions and allow 24 hours for them to dry.

I've had them fail to stick when using hand soap (both bar and liquid). I've never had them fail when using dishwashing soap.

I even lost my mask at Redondo Beach, CA when a large wave to it right off my face. It rolled around in the surf zone for a few days before someone found it and shipped it back to me. DiveOptx still in place.


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InTheBlue
October 11th, 2011, 06:54 PM
There are 3 companies in the world that supply quality prescription lenses in masks. Welcome to Dive-Vision.com, Divers first choice for prescription dive masks and Asia's premier prescription dive mask and swim goggles supplier (http://www.Dive-Vision.com) is one of them that offers your precise RX in your mask, delivers around the world and offers dive professionals a discount.

mumphrey
October 11th, 2011, 07:27 PM
Both Sea Vision and XS Scuba make masks with readers already built in. Sea Vision's gauge reader comes in +2.0 only but come in lots of skirt and lens colors and cost $125-$130 on leisurepro. The XS mask (also called a gauge reader) comes in +1.75 only and in 5 different color combinations. Its only $68 on leisure pro. I've used them both and they both work great. The seavision is a little lower volume. I usually buy 3-4 of those at DEMA every other year at a price closer to the XS.

A regular mask with readers glued in does not work as well or last as long as the ones with lenses manufactured in.

BTW, ordering the Sea Vision masks directly from the manufacturer at DEMA seems to be the only way to actually get gauge readers with the skirt/frame/lens color you want. Maybe you will have better luck with your LDS but given that there are at least 24 possibilities, good luck.

TomZ
October 11th, 2011, 08:01 PM
I ordered a mask from my LDS with corrective lenses, readers in the bottom of the mask. The correction is good, but.... I'm real sensitive to anything, ANYTHING just a little off in my glasses. The permanent readers are fine, but only one eye at a time. The lenses are much farther away than my actual PD (Pupil Distance) of 65mm. I can only focus through one or the other by looking slightly sideways through one lens or the other. I needed to order a real prescription mask for my very nearsighted wife. I researched this issue and ordered one from Prescription Dive Masks (http://rxdivemask.com/) I ordered one for myself, after speaking with the optician (who is a diver) about my concerns. I haven't received them yet, but many reviewers speak highly of his work.


I received the masks today. We haven't been in the water yet, but both masks are much better than anything we've tried. The optician moved my reader lenses up a little higher and closer together than usual, letting me focus with both eyes. My wife was able to see well through both sections (bifocals). :thumb:

diverkelly
October 11th, 2011, 09:03 PM
freedc,
sad truth, and obviously shared by many of us.

I have over 10 years of U/W "solutions" since that very first every visit to the optometrist at age 42. and very sorry, but the really sad truth is it's a mildly slippery slope from here on out - your eyes will likely continue to slowly degrade, mine have.

when I started asking around our dive club like you have here, I realized the many of the folks I'd been buddying with claimed they could read their gauges but they certainly could not read mine. Have added that to my buddy check "what's my computer read?"

I started with the stick-on's, they are a great place to figure out mask position and magnification. tried lots of different configurations, different mags, 2 different mags (hi/lo) on one side, etc. there are smaller (cheaper) versions than diveoptix, search on "optx 20 20 stick-on bifocals" - and agree with all the "religiously follow directions" from earlier posts, that and waiting several days, as well as being very careful with hot water rinses will keep them on your mask for a very long time.

Next option were "look down masks" (aka "guage readers") described earlier with built-in magnifiers as part of the mfgr'd mask lens: a) few skirt options so they don't fit all faces - like mine, b) they follow a book-reading bi-focal paradigm putting the lenses in the very bottom so you have to crank your head way back to see anything in front of or above you, and c) if poor fit, you end up with a couple of table spoons of water in the bottom of the mask right at the magnifiers ... net-net, didn't work for me but the folks I sold them to seemed very happy to get them...

Next were drop-in replacement lenses, they are a great direction but the vast majority of the corrective lens market is for those other folks needing negative diopters, only a few manufacturers had positive magnifiers in any selection. this has improved dramatically probably due to our aging demographic. If you aren't buying a new mask turn keyed with the lenses, find a local shop that will absolutely positively warranty the conversion and then pay them to do it, otherwise you're out both the mask and the lenses if something breaks (happened to me...). bottom line with this option is you have to decide where you are going to compromise your vision, too much mag to see you camera and your gauge/computer and you may not won't see much else...practice with stick-on's at that mag directly in your primary field of view before buying.

My current "solution" is a $350+mask custom set of ground trifocal lenses glued into my favorite perfectly fitting mask. Found an optician who is a diver (as well as shooter so understands special needs), went in with my reg/gauges, computer, cameras and my wrist mounted compass (he loved all that! had me lay on the floor and measured distances to everything). My large main central field is lightly magnified targeting perfect vision @ 4-6' focal distance but doesn't sacrifice too much beyond that (that fabulous whale shark 30' away was very much in focus but hunting for hammerheads at the edge of the 90-120' visibility was probably compromised), the bottom magnifier is similar to my reading prescription targeting 15-24" focal length allowing me to read everything on my camera. The small top magnifying portion positioned just above the usual field of view targets a tight 8" focal length so for the first in a decade I can read a compass heading through the side window of my wrist mounted compass while swimming it!

only down side with glued in lenses is long term adhesion, prior posters are on the mark here - I had a dive master stuff my mask in my fin's foot pocket and now both glued in lenses have started to come off. they can be glued back in - as long as I don't loose them or they don't break when they eventually come loose. Still would do it again with glue-ins over custom ground replacement lenses and possibly end up with a leaky mask that no one in the chain will take responsibility for...

bottom line, it was the best $350 I've spent on dive gear in a very long time. Made a huge difference in the fun factor. And on the very first dive with them, I spotted a dozen pacific spiny lumpsuckers on a single dive, they're a very difficult marble sized fish to find here in the chilly NW - finding one is truly great, 2 is amazing, a dozen...well...I have the pictures to prove it.

good luck.

ps, and remember if you can't see with a magnified mask in air, you won't be able to see any better underwater, water may change the gross magnification (remember -everything looks bigger/closer) but not what correction your eye's need to see. I had 2 respected shops try to tell me that everything would be better once I had a magnified mask underwater...

R A Diver
October 11th, 2011, 09:39 PM
I have worn glasses since 12 years old. Can't stand contacts. First thing I did after getting certified was order a mask with prescription lens. Only cost about $100. Also have as backup a gauge reader mask. It is not set to my prescription, but is great help.
Robert, A Diver

roadsta
October 11th, 2011, 10:32 PM
I would strongly suggest you contact Welcome to Prescription Dive Masks 1-800-538-2878. (http://www.prescriptiondivemasks.com/) . They helped me by making a full bi-focal mask. They work one on one with you and are absolutely fantastic. I can now see so many little things (seahorses, goby's) that I had NEVER seen before. You should most definitely contact this company. They are the best.

vandolove2dive
October 11th, 2011, 11:03 PM
I gave up on the stick on lens and went with a prescription mask. Worth every penny of your investment. I've had mine for a few years now and they really make a difference since I don't have to look for that tiny little sweet spot.

Scubakaas
October 12th, 2011, 02:55 AM
I've hade several masks wince 1997 (and all had prescription lenses). Since my eyes are around -5 each, they are a welcome solution (have been wearing glasses as long as I can remember)

My first ones (Tusa IQ7000) had actual made to fit glasses (some delivered by the manufacturer, others made aftermarket). At the time, the "glue in" ones weren't of high quality (read: they would wash out regularly), hence my choice to replace the normal lenses with prescription ones

My latest mask (Poseidon Technica) is fitted with glued in glasses from Proteye, and they give you lifetime guarantee on the glue (They were fitted on the standard lenses by a Proteye specialist).

If you have any questions, please PM me (I can shoot some photo's of both systems)

SeaNSandScuba
October 12th, 2011, 06:05 AM
There are several practical and affordable choices. I own a dive store and carry the pre maid bifocal lenses . The work can be done while you wait. Depending on the mask.

Also the xsscuba gauge reader is a nice choice.

Remember that the computer font size is larger then the normal reading.

Keep diving,

Steve
:)

aquagirl214
October 12th, 2011, 06:27 AM
Go to divers direct, very reasonable. $34.00 per lens not bad. They have your mask ready in 10 mins.

hoestenbach
October 12th, 2011, 09:01 AM
I got rid of my lcd watches and use analog and use a computer with larger display (not one of the new watch styles). I tried prescription lenses, replacement lenses, the stick in magnifiers (work great on my sunglasses), but I was never comfortable with any of those options. I use a SeaVision masks with gauge reader lenses. Never cared for the various tinted lenses SV offers but they also have clear lenses with, I believe 2+ gauge reader spots and their masks seem to fit me well. Damn it's hell getting old.

Vcelson
October 12th, 2011, 01:05 PM
SeaVision makes a great mask with a small circle for reading guages which is what both my husband and I got when we first needed help reading the gauges. He is still happy with the mask, after having it for about 8 years and having sent it back for perscription changes. I have moved on to full bifocals which I had put into two masks that I had around. They have the full lower half reading prescription the the top distance prescription. I have them redone every 2nd year - at my local Sports Chalet which sends them to someone local. The down side is that it isn't inexpensive, but it really beats the over-the-counter fixes.

water1man
October 12th, 2011, 01:19 PM
howdy- a HUD mask fixes the computer issue as anyone can read the output. as for the compass a see through side makes the numbers larger. You will be more informed by the info you get then your buddy subconsciously:cool2: ie: temps etc.:dork2:

SubMariner
October 13th, 2011, 04:14 PM
Another SeaVision fan here. Both Hubby and myself have been using them for several years, since we got to the [ahem] "bifocal" age.

Gauge readers were never an option for me because I'm nearsighted+astigmatic; I used to wear contacts until I needed bifocals.

As for the tinted lenses... I tried a pair of the colour correcting ones (see my profile pic -- me in the Red Sea circa 2001) but they were not very good for night diving or diving in low vis conditions, so I went back to just clear lenses.

clockradio
October 16th, 2011, 01:30 PM
thanks for the fogies reference. anyway i have been using a mask with a 150 bifocal lense. works great. also i use a contact lense on one eye. I'm 63, dove yesterday, so you still have some diving left.

jan10
October 17th, 2011, 02:25 PM
Cressi Corrective Lens for Big Eyes Evolution Mask (http://www.leisurepro.com/Prod/CSBMLEV.html?Search=op%3dgcsSearch%26Term%3d%26Sea rchFlag%3dall%26AdvSrchSortField%3dStock%26DescSor t%3d0%26Description%3don%26Hit%3d1)


LP sells tons of replacement lenses with different strength diopters attached for all different makes of masks. I just put a Cressi up as an example. I replaced my Mares X-Visions left lens with a +2.5 diopter. Works great for reading gauges. Light years better than the plastic stick-on lenses. And about the same price. The diopter/lens is pro grade glass and it's permanently fussed to the lens. Very high quality that won't fall off. It takes about two minutes to swap out the lens yourself.

Hi Philiboy

I have the same problem and it is not only for reading computers etc, but also I take pictures and the macrostuff becomes very hard to discover. So, You only changed one glass ? What is the effect then ? you close the left eye to see far away and the right eye to see for the macro stuff or the computer ? or are both eyes adapting themselves 'automatically' ?
thks
Jan

water1man
October 24th, 2011, 11:46 AM
As I said, a HUD lets you read you data.

InTheBlue
October 27th, 2011, 06:36 PM
There are 3 companies that put your precise prescription into your mask. (we are one of them - Welcome to Dive-Vision.com, Divers first choice for prescription dive masks and Asia's premier prescription dive mask and swim goggles supplier (http://www.dive-vision.com)) The lenses are exactly the same as your glasses and are permanently bonded into the mask which reduces the fogging normally associated with clip in lenses. I know a lot of people wear contact lenses but any mask with lenses is safer than using contact lenses as they can be dislodged if your mask fills with water. There is enough going on underwater without having to worry about a contact lens around the back of your eye!
Please get in touch if we can help.

SubMariner
October 31st, 2011, 01:43 PM
There are 3 companies that put your precise prescription into your mask. (we are one of them - Welcome to Dive-Vision.com, Divers first choice for prescription dive masks and Asia's premier prescription dive mask and swim goggles supplier (http://www.dive-vision.com)) The lenses are exactly the same as your glasses and are permanently bonded into the mask which reduces the fogging normally associated with clip in lenses. I know a lot of people wear contact lenses but any mask with lenses is safer than using contact lenses as they can be dislodged if your mask fills with water. There is enough going on underwater without having to worry about a contact lens around the back of your eye!
Please get in touch if we can help.

Please stop spreading mis-information in an effort to flog your wares.

The likelihood of a contact lens being dislodged if your mask fills with water is quite remote. As for "a contact lens around the back of your eye" [if your mask gets flooded]... that's a physical impossibility: the lens cannot go around the conjunctiva.

sibermike7
October 31st, 2011, 05:16 PM
Please stop spreading mis-information in an effort to flog your wares.

The likelihood of a contact lens being dislodged if your mask fills with water is quite remote. As for "a contact lens around the back of your eye" [if your mask gets flooded]... that's a physical impossibility: the lens cannot go around the conjunctiva.


Ahh, give them a break! ;)
They didn't actually say that the contact lens would/could go around to the back of the eye, just that
There is enough going on underwater without having to worry about a contact lens around the back of your eye!.
So you see, no worries with their masks! :D

InTheBlue
November 7th, 2011, 02:35 AM
Any dive professional knows that it is not one single factor that causes a major problem underwater but a series. We speak to multiple people that have had their lenses dislodged whilst diving. We suggest taking one possible problem away by not wearing contacts. Hardly mis-information, just sound advice and it's my job to flog my wares. Makes me wonder why you are so concerned that I was giving sound advice whilst 'flogging my wares' as you put it. I think all divers and dive businesses should be supporting each other in these difficult times, not trying to score cheap points in a forum.

sibermike7
November 7th, 2011, 04:05 AM
Oh, just to let you know, it is "wares". You "wear" a mask and sell "wares" however since 1/2 of Americans probably can't spell correctly and English is so crazy AND you are doing pretty well anyway, we'll be gracious and give you a pass. :D
:popcorn:

InTheBlue
November 7th, 2011, 07:28 AM
Mm. Well pointed out and I feel embarrassed. My education should have been good enough to get it right. Maybe I was so incensed with SubMariners mail that all spelling skills left me. I will of course edit post to make sure it is correct for others.

KWS
November 7th, 2011, 07:46 AM
If it is any comfort to you "IT does not get any better" Your eyes will stabilize at 50 or so if that long. Now to your OP. I am the same. i bought a compumask some time ago. I found that i could read when very close or at arms distance. !st the mask I would not gt again. So for me changing the computer distance is not a repeatable option. However on hte aeris board for the mask there are some addresses for getting lenses put in your mask. one in illiinois and the other i thinkin cal. illinois wasts i think well under 100.00 to overlay your script in hte mask. BUT now what do you do for a spare mask. Another well under 100.00 being the only option. If you are of the DIR sect, then the mask is probably a no-no. So that leaves gettng good-doog masks that you will have to make sure they can have lenses bonded to them. . Call them for restrictions on faceplate materials, isf any. I unlike you have resorted to using contacts. You only need one. And by the way My last mask done was about 75.00 for both eyes. They recommend only getting one done. Something for you to think about. I had both done. A single eye on a backup mask may be the way to go. Just send them your script. The lensing was covered by my flex spending acct if you have one.

from the aeris site:


Prescription Lenses

We are pleased to announce AERIS' approval of two leading vendors to install prescription lenses in the CompuMask.

Please contact them directly with any questions.

Scuba Optics, Inc.
1405 8th Ave.
Rock Falls, IL, USA
Phone: 815-625-7272
Toll Free: 800-346-2654
Fax: 815-625-9735
Email: scubaopt@essex1.com

Prescription Dive Masks
8801 & Ĺ La Mesa Blvd
La Mesa, CA 91942, USA
Phone: 619-299-2878
Toll Free: 800-538-2878
Fax 619-297-9500
Email: llpdm@cox.net





This is totally traumatic for me but I just came to the realization that after a lifetime of 20/20 vision and never having to worry about corrective lenses, I suddenly can't focus on stuff that's close to my face, like my freaking dive computer, air gauge, and compass! :cussing: I guess that comes with turning 43.

I'm just coming to grips with this, so maybe you older divers can tell me what I'm in for. Am I going to need bifocals? A special mask? Contact lenses for diving? What do other fogies do who can't read their dials but otherwise see fine?

water1man
November 7th, 2011, 01:26 PM
Heads up displays can be read by you thus the computer issue is not.


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