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DandyDon
September 24th, 2012, 11:44 PM
Diver survives 40 minutes without air (http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/world/diver-survives-40-minutes-without-air/story-fnb64oi6-1226480909239)
A PROFESSIONAL oil rig diver has cheated death by surviving deep in the North Sea for almost 40 minutes after his main air supply was cut.

Chris Lemons was diving at 80m when he was left with just his emergency oxygen tank after his "umbilical" was accidentally severed. The line supplies air and heating essential for work in very cold water.
While a fellow diver was able to return to the refuge of a diving bell, Mr Lemons began an agonising wait for rescue. He followed safety procedures, sitting still on top of the oil rig drill where he had been working, conserving as much oxygen as he could, and hoping that help would arrive.
By the time that he was located by a remotely operated vehicle and retrieved by his colleague, Mr Lemons was unconscious and very cold. But to the relief of his workmates, once he had been dragged inside the diving bell, he revived almost as soon as his helmet was removed.

The incident occurred last Tuesday 115 miles east of Peterhead, Aberdeenshire. Mr Lemons, from Mallaig, in the Scottish Highlands, was attached to the Bibby Topaz support vessel. Since the accident, both men and a third diver known as the bellman, who remained in the bell, have spent most of their time in a decompression chamber in Aberdeen.
Stories of Mr Lemons's extraordinary calm in the face of death have won admiration from across the diving community. On an internet forum, a fellow diver described the chain of events after the "umbilical" was severed.
"Chris said he knew to try and conserve his gas even though he was freezing to death," said the diver. "He doesn't remember slipping into unconsciousness, it just happened. It took [38 minutes] to get him back in the bell. After two breaths by the bellman he started breathing on his own.
"Once his breathing was restored he recovered quite quickly so they proceeded to start and warm him once the bell was on its way up (he was blue when they removed his hat)."
A spokesman for Bibby Offshore praised "the skill, professionalism and expertise of the crew of the Bibby Topaz" for rescuing Mr Lemons.
However, concerns have been raised about the incident that led to the severing of his main air supply. An alarm on the ship indicated that its dynamic positioning (DP) system had failed, causing the vessel to drift.
In a statement, the company described what happened: "The red light alarm was initiated; dive control was informed and both divers instructed to get back to the bell stage as soon as and as safely as possible. At this point Diver Two [Mr Lemons] noticed his umbilical had been snagged on the side of the subsea structure close to the top. He began trying to free his umbilical and requested slack.
"At 22.12 hrs, with the vessel still drifting, all communications and video was lost to Diver Two. On the bridge the DP operator, chief officer and master were trying to regain control of the vessel by manual operation of the thrusters. The bridge was in communication with dive control and was informed that Diver One was safely back on the bell stage and that Diver Two's umbilical had been severed. At this point Diver Two had reverted to his standby breathing gas supply."
It took a further 28 minutes for the vessel to move back into position, after drifting 240m. By then Mr Lemons's locator beacon had been seen on top of the drill rig structure. The bell was lowered again, as close as possible to the slumped diver, but it took a further six minutes to haul Mr Lemons aboard. Medical staff were on hand when the men reached the surface.
"All divers were transferred to the chamber system and treatment was provided to Diver Two, which included being put on therapeutic oxygen," said Bibby Offshore. "A routine decompression schedule commenced." Last night the company said that all three divers had "a clean bill of health".
One of Mr Lemons's colleagues said: "Chris has been very lucky. It brings it home just how quickly things can go pear-shaped."

Scuba_Noob
September 25th, 2012, 12:22 AM
I can't even imagine how freaky that would be, especially to feel so helpless. Thank goodness he made it out safely.

lavachickie
September 25th, 2012, 12:33 AM
Nerves of steel, man. Damn.

Thiad
September 25th, 2012, 01:05 AM
That's keeping one's head when the sh*t hits the fan. Wow.

Griff..
September 25th, 2012, 02:05 AM
Indeed.. Can't imagine what must have been going through his head

GramsciBeat
September 25th, 2012, 06:23 AM
Respect.

I assume it was an emergency gas tank he used at 80m and and not - as reported - an oxygen tank.

tempoffroad
September 25th, 2012, 07:30 AM
Wow! Remaining calm saved him for sure.

Akimbo
September 25th, 2012, 12:54 PM
A lot of time and money is spent in anticipation of this failure. Every sat diver, supervisor, and support technician is always considering this possibility and ways to prevent it. Fortunately (or a testament to the crews), it is amazingly rare that the procedures and systems actually have to be used.

Every bell has emergency gas and battery power. Most can drop weight and disconnect the steel lifting cable from inside — a really scary last ditch option. Hyperthermia is the biggest danger, beyond pressure hull failure.

As usual, this report is confusing. It sounds like the main (surface to bell) umbilical was severed, but also talks about the diver’s (bell to diver) umbilical was entangled. Does anyone know any more of the details?


Indeed.. Can't imagine what must have been going through his head

These guys are brothers... they know everything possible is being done to get them back safe. You could not do this work otherwise.

Searcaigh
September 25th, 2012, 01:04 PM
This story was also on the BBC World news this morning

Diver survives severed air supply line in North Sea (http://www.sportdiver.co.uk/News/Latest-News/Diver-survives-severed-air-supply-line-in-North-Sea)

ajduplessis
September 25th, 2012, 01:50 PM
SAT Divers plan for thing like this, but you still need to execute when pooh hits fan. It's another reminder for any type diver rec or tec, that you need to plan for "will never happen" or "very unlikely" events. Practice your skills, Murphy is always looking for diving buddies!!!

Duke Dive Medicine
September 25th, 2012, 04:44 PM
This sounds like a gas jump in an open-bottom bell vs. a saturation dive. Sat divers' umbilicals come from inside the bell so it would be all but impossible to sever them from the surface. Glad there's a happy ending to the story... this must have been a solid dive crew.

Akimbo
September 25th, 2012, 05:06 PM
This sounds like a gas jump in an open-bottom bell vs. a saturation dive...

Last I heard, that would be illegal in the North Sea. 50 meters max on air, mixed gas requires a bell system with mating deck chamber. As a result, virtually all diving below 50 meters is sat.

Lemna
September 25th, 2012, 07:30 PM
This account by another diver on the Bibby Topaz clarifies a lot: Dive hose severed during DP vessel runoff (http://www.offshorediver.com/content/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1475:dive-hose-severed-during-dp-vessel-runoff&catid=59:near-miss&Itemid=584)

Duke Dive Medicine
September 25th, 2012, 07:34 PM
Last I heard, that would be illegal in the North Sea. 50 meters max on air, mixed gas requires a bell system with mating deck chamber. As a result, virtually all diving below 50 meters is sat.

Thanks for the clarification. The blog post above makes it look like the diver's umbilical got fouled and parted vs. got cut. Makes sense now.

Akimbo
September 25th, 2012, 08:25 PM
This account by another diver on the Bibby Topaz clarifies a lot: Dive hose severed during DP vessel runoff (http://www.offshorediver.com/content/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1475:dive-hose-severed-during-dp-vessel-runoff&catid=59:near-miss&Itemid=584)

28 minutes is a really long time below 250'! Any idea what bailout system was used? Hard to imagine being that cold and living — hot water suits fit like coveralls for someone twice your size so you may as well be naked when the water stops.

Crush
September 25th, 2012, 11:43 PM
Very excellent news. The commercial diving community takes safety very seriously, in part because they understand the dangers. A portion of the recreational diving community takes safety (in terms of redundancy, planning contingencies, etc.) less seriously, in part because they don't understand the dangers.

Lemna
September 26th, 2012, 02:50 AM
28 minutes is a really long time below 250'! Any idea what bailout system was used? Hard to imagine being that cold and living — hot water suits fit like coveralls for someone twice your size so you may as well be naked when the water stops.
Probably twin 7L/300 bar tanks.

Searcaigh
September 26th, 2012, 06:07 AM
Probably twin 7L/300 bar tanks.

When I worked offshore in the 80s it was a single 15L steel HP with 16% O2 in HeO2

Hot water suits were not exactly tight but we wore a fleece lined one piece suit called a wooly bear underneath to prevent burns from the hot water should the temperature get out of control.

renoun
September 26th, 2012, 06:28 AM
More details from the professional mariners point of view (http://gcaptain.com/forum/offshore/9854-incident-timeline-bibby-offshore-dsv-loses-dp-30-a.html) posted to a diffearnt forum. It appears that the cause of this emergency was the failure of the dive ship's dynamic positioning system (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_positioning) which is designed to hold the ship in position above the work site. When he DPS failed the ship drifted off and had to be manually returned to station and held in position before a rescue could be attempted.

Akimbo
September 26th, 2012, 01:15 PM
Probably twin 7L/300 bar tanks.

We used AGA (now Interspiro) 3.8L/300 bar twins for bailouts in the 1970s and 80s... still my favorite Scuba rig in cold water. Who makes those HP 7 Liter bottles now?

In any case, they could not have lasted long after the hot water stopped flowing. His core temperature must have dropped like a rock. As a reference, Helium conducts heat about 6x faster than air and about 50% or our heat loss is through respiration.

You have to take slow deep breaths to conserve gas in a lightweight hat — shallow breaths builds up CO2 in the oral-nasal mask pretty fast. I don’t know about you guys but my respiration rate skyrockets when that cold water hits my crotch. He must have had amazing self-control or the cold shut his body down in ways science doesn’t fully understand to last that long without gas.

Maybe some of you guys with more recent sat experience know: Are they running rich O2 bail-out mixes these days? Hyper-oxygenation might account for some of the added survival time. We used to keep ours the same as the umbilical mix, between .3 and .5 ATA.

Lemna
September 26th, 2012, 03:49 PM
We used AGA (now Interspiro) 3.8L/300 bar twins for bailouts in the 1970s and 80s... still my favorite Scuba rig in cold water. Who makes those HP 7 Liter bottles now?

Eurocylinders, for example: DIR Halcyon D7, 300 bar (http://www.deepstop.de/dir-halcyon-d7-300-bar-p-497.html)

This is a quite popular set around here for recreational diving.

TONY CHANEY
September 26th, 2012, 03:55 PM
More than likely the cold water assisted in saving his life.

Akimbo
September 26th, 2012, 04:35 PM
Eurocylinders, for example: DIR Halcyon D7, 300 bar (http://www.deepstop.de/dir-halcyon-d7-300-bar-p-497.html)...

Thanks for that link. I wish we could get them over here. I am using a pair of twin LP-45 Fabers (7 Liter/182 Bar) for recreational diving. I built another set with a special manifold for bailout use over here with only 12mm between cylinders.

The first two images are the valve-down recreational rig with the 190mm isolation manifold and the last image is the custom manifold for the narrower bailout.

Bombay High
September 27th, 2012, 04:17 AM
We used AGA (now Interspiro) 3.8L/300 bar twins for bailouts in the 1970s and 80s... still my favorite Scuba rig in cold water. Who makes those HP 7 Liter bottles now?

In any case, they could not have lasted long after the hot water stopped flowing. His core temperature must have dropped like a rock. As a reference, Helium conducts heat about 6x faster than air and about 50% or our heat loss is through respiration.

You have to take slow deep breaths to conserve gas in a lightweight hat — shallow breaths builds up CO2 in the oral-nasal mask pretty fast. I don’t know about you guys but my respiration rate skyrockets when that cold water hits my crotch. He must have had amazing self-control or the cold shut his body down in ways science doesn’t fully understand to last that long without gas.

Maybe some of you guys with more recent sat experience know: Are they running rich O2 bail-out mixes these days? Hyper-oxygenation might account for some of the added survival time. We used to keep ours the same as the umbilical mix, between .3 and .5 ATA.

This is one of the most amazing stories in recent times. That he is alive (and still in deco) is nothing short of a miracle. I had an email from a rep from the Divers Association who is in Aberdeen right now trying to get more information. The bailout gas is still the same as the umbilical (deep mix). He was out of gas for more than 18 minutes (if my information is correct). The hypothesis right now is that the cold made him unconscious before he ran out of gas, and thats pretty much what saved his life. He was in suspended animation and revived with the first or second breath he was given by the bellman. Never heard of anything like this before.
He was also incredibly calm, given that he had to have known that his chances of ever seeing topside (and his loved ones) was pretty slim.
The dive operator knows that he's going to be given a proper shafting on this one. This could have been the 1st fatality in the North Sea in over 9 years.
I am just happy that there was a huge wakeup call end the ending is a happy one.

Sat Diver
September 27th, 2012, 11:46 AM
The ship lost its position and dragged the bell. One diver made it back and the other had his umbilical looped around a part of the structure, and when the bell moved, it snapped the umbilical. It was with utter disbelief and happiness that I read that the Diver survived and is apparently doing well (under the circumstances).
Without a doubt, his life is changed forever.
He looked into the light and came back.
On the floor of the North Sea that is as much of a miracle as you can ask for.
SS -keep us posted as you hear more. I was surprised Mark Longstreath has been silent until now. He is probably waiting for more info before taking action.
Mark, Hal Watts, John Roat and gang are doing a great job at the Association. I hope it works to improve safety standards. How is your battle going ?

Akimbo
September 27th, 2012, 12:06 PM
… The bailout gas is still the same as the umbilical (deep mix). He was out of gas for more than 18 minutes (if my information is correct...

Maybe this is a question for the medical forum, but maybe a rich O2 bailout mix might be worth considering. As I understand it, even 5-10 breaths at 2-3x normal PPO2 goes a long way towards supersaturating the blood. It could make the difference when seconds count. I wouldn’t have any heartburn with a 1.5 ATA mix calculated for the deepest excursion. OxTox is pretty remote in the few minutes a bailout lasts, even under stress.

Can anybody remember a case where a diver didn’t make it to the hatch on bailout?


... This could have been the 1st fatality in the North Sea in over 9 years...

Pretty amazing when you think of the tens of thousands of in-water man-hours in the last 9 years. Even more so when you deduct “industrial accidents” (crush injuries, parted rigging, tool failures, etc.) from the true diving accidents (no-gas, bad gas, hyperthermia, etc.) over the last 30 years… especially when you limit it to sat.

Moonglow
September 27th, 2012, 12:24 PM
He was out of gas for more than 18 minutes (if my information is correct). The hypothesis right now is that the cold made him unconscious before he ran out of gas, and thats pretty much what saved his life. He was in suspended animation and revived with the first or second breath he was given by the bellman. Never heard of anything like this before.

You got that right! "Suspended animation" is science fiction.

Crush
September 27th, 2012, 12:29 PM
Maybe this is a question for the medical forum, but maybe a rich O2 bailout mix might be worth considering. As I understand it, even 5-10 breaths at 2-3x normal PPO2 goes a long way towards supersaturating the blood. It could make the difference when seconds count. I wouldn’t have any heartburn with a 1.5 ATA mix calculated for the deepest excursion. OxTox is pretty remote in the few minutes a bailout lasts, even under stress.

Interesting question outside of my expertise. If memory serves me, in the former Soviet Union they used to do heart transplants without a heart and lung machine to keep the patient alive. The procedure was to put the patient under, then cool their entire body and especially the head. The cooling led to decreased cellular activity allowing the tissues to survive on what oxygen remained in the tissues - this was particularly important for the brain which is energy-hungry and where small amounts of cellular damage can have (or not) a pronounced effect. I don't know of pure O2 was part of the regimen or not. Unfortunately I don't think (correct me if I am wrong) that removing your hard hat to allow the water to cool your head is feasible or even desirable. Plus, it would take a while for the cool water to cool your brain - perhaps just a system-wide cooling is all you can hope for.

Bombay High
September 27th, 2012, 01:35 PM
Can anybody remember a case where a diver didn’t make it to the hatch on bailout?



Pretty amazing when you think of the tens of thousands of in-water man-hours in the last 9 years. Even more so when you deduct “industrial accidents” (crush injuries, parted rigging, tool failures, etc.) from the true diving accidents (no-gas, bad gas, hyperthermia, etc.) over the last 30 years… especially when you limit it to sat.

Cant remember a case offhand of a diver not making it back on bailout.

The track record in the North Sea is pretty amazing all things considered. In Sat there is such little room for error, and I think thats one of the reasons everyone stays so focussed on the job at hand.

---------- Post Merged at 11:03 PM ---------- Previous Post was at 11:00 PM ----------




SS -keep us posted as you hear more. I was surprised Mark Longstreath has been silent until now. He is probably waiting for more info before taking action.
Mark, Hal Watts, John Roat and gang are doing a great job at the Association. I hope it works to improve safety standards. How is your battle going ?

Yes, very uncharacteristic of Mark. Gathering ammo no doubt. The Association is the way forward. They have already got the attention of the powers that be. You should join. My battle is getting along ... not a battle really :-) with Stena its more of a family fight.

---------- Post Merged at 11:05 PM ---------- Previous Post was at 11:00 PM ----------


You got that right! "Suspended animation" is science fiction.

It is like science fiction that this guy is alive right now.

Akimbo
September 27th, 2012, 02:01 PM
… Unfortunately I don't think (correct me if I am wrong) that removing your hard hat to allow the water to cool your head is feasible or even desirable. Plus, it would take a while for the cool water to cool your brain - perhaps just a system-wide cooling is all you can hope for.

Interesting thought on brain cooling… but way too big a price to pay for loosing gas and comms. Carbon Dioxide will still cause involuntary respiration when unconscious so you would also have the problem of clearing water from the lungs. Wouldn’t it be nice if this near-tragedy resulted in a safer system overall?

I seem to remember an old movie where a man and woman were trapped and she would intentionally drown as the hero swam her back to another habitat. She hypothesized that the cold would allow her to recover… this event is fantastic but a lot more believable than that movie.

DandyDon
September 27th, 2012, 02:08 PM
I seem to remember an old movie where a man and woman were trapped and she would intentionally drown as the hero swam her back to another habitat. She hypothesized that the cold would allow her to recover… this event is fantastic but a lot more believable than that movie.
The Abyss (1989) - IMDb (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0096754/)


You got that right! "Suspended animation" is science fiction.
I don't remember the medical term for prolonged survival chances when drowning in cold water either. It was a catchy term for this discussion. One phrase I do recall is "They're not dead until warm and dead."

EastEndDiver
September 27th, 2012, 04:56 PM
Don is that what you are reffering to?


The Mammalian Diving Reflex (http://www.breatheology.com/services/articles/freediving/the-mammalian-diving-reflex)

Mammalian Diving Reflex: A Cool Artifact of Human Evolution | Evolvify (http://evolvify.com/superhuman-tricks-mammalian-diving-reflex/)

DandyDon
September 27th, 2012, 08:38 PM
Don is that what you are reffering to?


The Mammalian Diving Reflex (http://www.breatheology.com/services/articles/freediving/the-mammalian-diving-reflex)

Mammalian Diving Reflex: A Cool Artifact of Human Evolution | Evolvify (http://evolvify.com/superhuman-tricks-mammalian-diving-reflex/)
Yep, looks like it - thanks. I like the reference to hibernation and that it includes a note about children surviving better.

Bombay High
September 28th, 2012, 03:01 AM
This has come from a Diver who was in Saturation along with the Diver whose umbilical was severed :

"Quick update for you all, Flakey was almost right but a few facts need clarifying:-
Both divers were outside the structure, looks like diver 1's umbilical got a turn around a external transponder bucket on side of structure when run off occurred. Vessel ran off 180 mts and did indeed part his umbilical. It took 26 mins to get the vessel back to over the structure, although the ROV had located him well before that, Chris the diver in question said he knew to try and conserve his gas even though he was freezing to death. He doesn't remember slipping into unconsciousness it just happened. It has been worked out that in total it took 46 mins to get him back in the bell, after 2 breaths by the bellman he started breathing on his own, he even stood up and out the way on his own steam to help in getting the bottom door down, once his breathing was restored he recovered quite quickly so they proceeded to start and warm him once the door was down and the bell was on its way up. (he was blue when they removed his hat). Diver 2 and the bellman were very professional in all of this as was the dive supervisor Craig Frederick, the lads themselves said Graig kept them focused and preempted everything.
Chris the diver climbed out of the bell and into the TL on his own steam and was warmed up further in the TL using the shower and wrapping him in towels, once stabilised he was transferred to the chamber. He appears to of made a full recovery and we have all been taking the piss at the lengths some people will go to for a short bellrun. ( obviously to try and lighten what was a very somber mood ) Chris has been very very very lucky. It brings it home just how quickly things can go pear shaped. The DP system is the prime suspect as the bridge said they had no control during the whole run off, that is being investigated with a fine toothcombe and we are all being decompressed as the investigation will be thorough and exhaustive time and getting back to work are not ab issue... I'll try and let you all know any outcomes when and if we find out !! "

In other news:

"I expect the HSE OSD will slap a "Prohibition Notice" on the vessel for this near fatality, so they wont be going anywhere just now. As far as I recall, a "Prohibition Notice" can only be lifted by the Ptocurator Fiscal in Scotland. We shall sea."

And further whispers in Scotland - Divers pressurise HSE to force the development of a new rebreather system as bailout. Bet the Oil companies say they dont have the funds for R&D ;)

Akimbo
September 28th, 2012, 12:53 PM
…And further whispers in Scotland - Divers pressurise HSE to force the development of a new rebreather system as bailout. Bet the Oil companies say they dont have the funds for R&D ;) …

I can’t imagine a rebreather that can be reliable as a bailout system in such a harsh and demanding environment — though it would be great for tech divers. Besides, unlimited bailout gas does not solve the far bigger problem of [-]hyperthermia[/-] hyporthermia. It sounds like this diver may have passed out before breathing down his limited bailout gas anyway... granted he was pretty shallow. On the other hand think how fast he would chill on a 1% deep mix.

Translation of Bombay High’s post for non-commercial divers reading this:

TL: Transfer Lock. The deck chamber that the bell mates/clamps to which is permanently connected to one or more living chambers. The “mating” process runs like this: The deck chamber complex and bell is pressurized on the shallow end (or above) of the working depth range. There is an internal pressure-seating hatch in both plus a trunk/skirt with a flange for big rapid acting clamps. Some bells have a second hatch on the side for mating, some “top mate” to the TL. The bell and TL trunks are clamped together and the O-ring sealed space between (about 24" in diameter) is pressurized/equalized making the bell, truck, and TL equal. At that point the hatches can open (Note: The pressure at 1 FSW on that hatch would be over 200 Lbs of force holding it shut). Hatches open, crews change, and the process is reversed and repeated 24/7.

DP: Dynamic Positioning. A computer automatically drives the ship’s main propellers and side-thrusters to maintain position within a few feet over the bottom… no anchors are used. It is safe for divers because the bell is lowered through a “moonpool” amidships (most stable point) so divers cannot contact rotating propellers. There is also a manual joy stick normally used for docking and minor maneuvering. Baring an operational requirement to maintain heading, the computer can rotate the ship around the moonpool heading into the seas/weather.

ROV: Remotely Operated Vehicle. Basically a highly maneuverable cable-powered swimming TV camera(s) driven by operators on the surface. All have lights and some navigation, some have manipulator$.

HSE: Health and Safety Executive. A British government agency tasked with diver (among others) safety… Sort of like OSHA in the US.

Bellman: Probably obvious, the bell operator and tender. Also a diver on alternate bell runs.

Diver’s Umbilical: A collection of hoses and cables from inside the bell to the diver. The individual components are taped or seized together every 12-24" or can be ordered twisted together (candy-cane style).

They contain:

Voice communications cable
Breathing gas (from the surface backed up by emergency banks on the bell)
Hot Water: ~2½ gallons/minute at 110° F at the suit/diver. The same hot water heats the bell through a heat exchanger
Pneumofathomer Hose: A small hose (~¼" in diameter) connected to a precision pressure gauge (analog and/or digital) calibrated in feet and/or Meters of Sea Water on the surface to accurately monitor the diver’s depth. Air or breathing gas is used to manually blow all the water out of the open-end hose by the console operator or dive supervisor creating a column of air. Some operations may replace this with an electronic transducer but the pneumo is still popular because it can be an emergency breathing gas source by shoving the hose in your hat… to say nothing of simple, rugged, and reliable.
Hat-mounted Video and/or Lighting: Pretty standard these days but not universal. It can be separate or integrated with the communications cable
Exhaust Hose (sat systems only): Returns breathing gas to the surface via a hat-mounted demand exhaust regulator and a negative-biased back pressure regulator usually at the bell. Filters on the surface removes CO2, moisture, and biological outgassing. Oxygen is automatically added and it is compressed at least several hundred PSI above working depth, if not into HP storage. Basically it is a powered rebreather with technicians on the surface augmenting automated monitoring… oh and essentially unlimited electrical power and gas storage.
Strength Member: Some umbilicals include a rope, even though most of the individual components have a tensile strength high enough to tear a human body in half.


Did I miss anything? Sorry for the US/Imperial-centric units.

Maybe some of you with more recent experience can answer this: I don’t know what kind of transponders are used. Are they mandated in the British and/or Norwegian Sectors? Are they acoustic pingers, strobes, or some other “homing” technology? Is there an operational use or just emergency?

Bombay High
September 28th, 2012, 02:44 PM
Akimbo,
I have mixed feelings about the rebreather bailout. We all know how bailout rigs are treated topside. Rebreathers obviously will have to be treated differently.
Mark Longstreath has very cryptically hinted that there is a very rugged rebreather that is being built solely as bailout for very deep commercial divers. I will try to find out more, but it is apparently in development already. On a 300 plus metre lockout, I knew that my 7 litre twins were going to give me very little time to do any kind of problem solving :-) for that kind of situation, a rebreather that can take the environment, depth and handling that comes with our work would be welcome .. even if you are frozen before your gas runs out :D

Pingers are commonly used now. I dont think they were mandated ... but now they will be.

---------- Post Merged at 12:14 AM ---------- Previous Post was at 12:11 AM ----------

BTW - they will at some point release the video footage from the ROV that located Chris unconscious on the North Sea floor ...

CaveMD
September 28th, 2012, 03:06 PM
I think you guys may mean hypothermia rather than hyper.

Sent from my HTC PH39100 using Tapatalk 2

Akimbo
September 28th, 2012, 04:51 PM
I think you guys may mean hypothermia rather than hyper…

You’re right, typo on my part. Correction made

On a related note, some divers were killed in the mid-70s from hyperthermia. We all know about “heat of compression” from filling Scuba tanks. The same happens in chambers. Many sat complexes allow cross-connecting gauges in order to check them for accuracy and as backup in case of failure. Somebody had opened the cross-connect and the word didn’t get back to the console operator (human factors sort of sucked).

The chamber that the gauge was actually connected to was unmanned and was about to be “surfaced” (pressure bled off) in order for crews to clean and repair. Bottom line, the operator heard gas blowing off, the pressure droped on the gauge he thought was to the manned chamber, and started adding Helium as fast as possible in an attempt to overcome the “leak” (standard procedure). Lots of noise, yelling topside and over the unscrambler, and not much time passed.

By the time they figured it out the manned chamber was at or below the rated working pressure (not sure if relief valves popped), at least two guys were dead (don’t recall exactly). As I understood it, they didn’t know how hot it actually got. A byproduct of living in Helium’s high thermal conductivity is shirt sleeve comfortable at say 600' is about 90° F… +/- about 1°. 93° is far more sweltering than the hottest day in Houston and teeth chatter at 88°.

I had dinner with some of the diver’s onboard about a month later. Pretty sad.

---------- Post Merged at 01:51 PM ---------- Previous Post was at 01:07 PM ----------


…I have mixed feelings about the rebreather bailout. We all know how bailout rigs are treated topside. Rebreathers obviously will have to be treated differently.
Mark Longstreath has very cryptically hinted that there is a very rugged rebreather that is being built solely as bailout for very deep commercial divers....

Saturation divers are more than technically competent enough to learn to maintain and dive rebreathers. But I ask anyone to imagine making a rebreather that is absolutely reliable when not used beyond pre-dive checks, on the back of a working diver that must squeeze through a small hatch, could wear holes in his hot water suit in one dive (without coveralls), uses a hat instead of a mouthpiece, and has about as much as he can monitor now.

Now picture two of these rigs inside a 6' diameter sphere with two divers, bellman, hats, umbilicals, and all the rest of the systems that goes in a bell… unless you leave them outside and put them on after the hatch is open on the bottom. Slipping on an open-circuit bailout hung outside with one small LP hose to the hat with a QD (Quick Disconnect like a BC but larger) is one thing, but hooking up and keeping water out of two big flex hoses and breathing bags, plus connecting the readout display??? Sounds awfully ambitious.

I can see keeping the CO2 canister and electronics over-pressured off the umbilical to keep them dry when not in use, but what about the flex hoses and breathing bags? The US Navy put breathing bags on the back in a cowling like the GE Mark 10 rebreather, but the “work of respiration” is bad enough at 1000' using a modern open circuit or reclaim hat. I am all for an improved and ruggedized rebreather, but sat divers will be the last to use them, not the first.

Oh, and then there is the issue of the efficiency of the CO2 absorbent at 36° F, unless we heat it with hot water too. Even all this would be OK if we could keep the diver from passing out from hypothermia within a few minutes. The phrase “diminishing returns” comes to mind.

Now, after sharing some of the technical obstacles with others, I sure hope it works because I would love a ‘breather that reliable! No bubbles and constant PPO2 is as good as it gets, especially if reliability is so good that backup open circuit bottles are redundant.

John C. Ratliff
September 28th, 2012, 11:51 PM
Akimbo,

The terms you are looking for are immersion hypothermia and cold water near-drowning.

Hypothermia and Near Drowning (http://scuba-doc.com/hypoth.htm)

In cold water near-drowning one complication is water in the lungs. If that water is sea water, then it stays in the lungs and can cause pneumonia later. It can also interfere with resuscitation efforts. If the water is fresh water, then it goes into the blood stream, and can cause further systemic complications; in the extreme, it can dilute the blood, cause the red blood cells to swell and ultimately burst due to the osmotic gradient change.

In this case, the helmet undoubtedly helped by keeping water from being breathed. This would have really complicated the recovery if he had breathed water.

SeaRat

Akimbo
September 29th, 2012, 11:54 AM
…The terms you are looking for are immersion hypothermia and cold water near-drowning.

Hypothermia and Near Drowning (http://scuba-doc.com/hypoth.htm)…

I have heard of children that fell through ice recovering after 45 minutes, though they probably also had some water in their lungs. I don’t recall any adults going this long in water that was probably closer to the mid 40° F mark than freezing. Do you have any info to the contrary?



This has come from a Diver who was in Saturation along with the Diver whose umbilical was severed :…

… It took 26 mins to get the vessel back to over the structure, although the ROV had located him well before that, Chris the diver in question said he knew to try and conserve his gas even though he was freezing to death. He doesn't remember slipping into unconsciousness it just happened. It has been worked out that in total it took 46 mins to get him back in the bell, after 2 breaths by the bellman he started breathing on his own, …

(bold red emphasis is mine) I wonder if anyone checked how much gas was left in his bailout? Until you experience it, it is hard to imagine the cooling impact of breathing HeO2 (not Trimix) with oxygen under 10%. Divers have lost hot water many times but were working hard (along with the bellman) to get back to the bell rather than trying to conserve bailout gas.

I have never heard of a diver blacking-out from [-]hyperthermia[/-] hyporthermia, though drowning may have been “assumed” when bottles were found empty (which can easily happen after loss of consciousness, dropping the mouthpiece, and freeflowing). Do any of you Ice divers know of any?

Bombay High
September 29th, 2012, 02:26 PM
Akimbo, I wish some company or HSE could get you back to the North Sea in some capacity. It seems criminal to not exploit your depth of experience in sat diving. I am sure you have had enough, but it just seems a big loss to the commercial dive community and especially sat divers.

John C. Ratliff
September 29th, 2012, 03:03 PM
I have heard of children that fell through ice recovering after 45 minutes, though they probably also had some water in their lungs. I don’t recall any adults going this long in water that was probably closer to the mid 40° F mark than freezing. Do you have any info to the contrary?



(bold red emphasis is mine) I wonder if anyone checked how much gas was left in his bailout? Until you experience it, it is hard to imagine the cooling impact of breathing HeO2 (not Trimix) with oxygen under 10%. Divers have lost hot water many times but were working hard (along with the bellman) to get back to the bell rather than trying to conserve bailout gas.

I have never heard of a diver blacking-out from hyperthermia, though drowning may have been “assumed” when bottles were found empty (which can easily happen after loss of consciousness from dropping the mouthpiece and freeflowing). Do any of you Ice divers know of any?
Akimbo, here are a few examples of papers written on hypothermia (low body temperature, as opposed to "hyperthermia", which is high body temperature).


Wilderness Environ Med. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16538942#) 2006 Spring;17(1):26-30.
Problems and complications with cold-water rescue.

Giesbrecht GG (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Giesbrecht%20GG%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=16538942), Hayward JS (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Hayward%20JS%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=16538942).
Source

Laboratory for Exercise and Environmental Medicine, the Health, Leisure and Human Performance Research Institute, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada. giesbrec@ms.umanitoba.ca

Abstract

A case description is presented of a 9-member rowing team whose scull swamped on a small lake in Victoria, Canada, because of a sudden winter storm, which immersed them in 4 degrees C water for 50 minutes until a small rescue boat found them in darkness. Another 13 minutes of cold exposure in 6.7 degrees C air occurred during boat transport to waiting ambulance paramedics. Two rowers died, one from severe hypothermia and the other from drowning as a consequence of cold incapacitation and hypothermia. The 2 coldest rowers, who were transported 8 km to a major hospital, arrived with rectal temperatures of 23.4 degrees C and 25 degrees C; the first was asystolic and the second was unconscious and in sinus bradycardia. Analysis of all the circumstances of this incident provided an opportunity to observe a continuum of responses in a heterogeneous group of rowers at risk of severe hypothermia. Several practical lessons concerning cold-water survival, rescue, and treatment can be learned. The effects of low body mass were associated with greater cooling rate. Diminished neuromuscular performance in the periphery appeared to be independent of body mass. Rough handling during moving of patients with marked hypothermia introduces the risk of producing ventricular fibrillation or cardiac arrest. Unconscious, nonshivering hypothermia victims who are rescued and insulated from cold could have a further afterdrop of 3 degrees C to 4 degrees C. During transport to a hospital, the use of heating devices concentrating on core regions may increase the chance of successful treatment in the hospital. Cardiopulmonary bypass may be indicated for severely hypothermic patients in asystole.

PMID:16538942 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Problems and complications with cold-... [Wilderness Environ Med. 2006] - PubMed - NCBI (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16538942)

This one is the child you were talking about, but in warmer water:

Chest. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15136412#) 2004 May;125(5):1948-51.
Survival after prolonged submersion in freshwater in Florida.

Modell JH (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Modell%20JH%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=15136412), Idris AH (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Idris%20AH%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=15136412), Pineda JA (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Pineda%20JA%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=15136412), Silverstein JH (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Silverstein%20JH%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=15136412).
Source

Departments of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610-0254, USA. modeljh@shands.ufl.edu

Abstract

A 2-year-old boy was submerged for at least 20 min in a freshwater creek in Union County, FL. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was administered for approximately 1 h at the scene and during transport to the hospital. On arrival, his Glasgow coma scale score was 3 and rectal temperature was < or = 26.7 degrees C. He demonstrated respiratory failure, intense vasoconstriction, hemoglobinuria, anemia, hypercoagulability, thrombocytosis, leukopenia, and persistent coma. With intensive care, he began emerging from the coma after 72 h and progressively improved. Testing at the Developmental Evaluation Center and clinical observations showed him to be completely normal by 6 months after drowning. Thus, severe, rapid hypothermia can occur during drowning in cold water in any geographic location and at temperatures above those necessary for ice formation. Hypothermia provides cerebral protection from hypoxia, permitting total recovery with appropriate CPR and intensive care.

Comment in



Immersion in fresh water and survival. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15596713) [Chest. 2004]Immersion in fresh water and survival.Dueker CW. Chest. 2004 Dec; 126(6):2027-8; author reply 2028-9.


PMID:15136412 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15136412

This one is of a 31 year old woman who survived 30 minutes submersion:

J Int Neuropsychol Soc. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9375192#) 1996 May;2(3):256-60.
Near drowning in frigid water: a case study of a 31-year-old woman.

Huckabee HC (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Huckabee%20HC%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=9375192), Craig PL (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Craig%20PL%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=9375192), Williams JM (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Williams%20JM%5BAuthor%5D&cauthor=true&cauthor_uid=9375192).
Source

University of Alaska, Anchorage, USA.

Abstract

A 31-yr-old woman demonstrated intact neuropsychological functioning after being submerged for at least 30 minutes in icy cold water. Following submersion, the patient received CPR for approximately 1 hr. Eight hours after submersion, the patient's temperature was 31 degrees C (87 degrees F). She remained nonresponsive for 2 days after the accident. Extensive neuropsychological testing was completed 3 mo after the accident with no objective or subjective deficits evidenced. This case of hypothermically mediated neuroprotection from anoxia in an adult supports the need for further research on the putative neurophysiological mechanisms invoked and the potential for application of clinically induced hypothermia in the acute management of other types of cerebral insults.

PMID:9375192 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9375192

Akimbo
September 29th, 2012, 04:55 PM
…This one is the child you were talking about, but in warmer water…

Not this one, definitely this kid was less than 10 years old, fell through ice somewhere in the US, and “reported” underwater more than 45 minutes. This kid fully recovered at the hospital after controlled re-heating.

There have been a bunch of them reported in the last 15-20 years. Google: “child falls through ice”. Incidences like this are so miraculous that survivors would either been burned at the stake or deemed the second coming 200 years ago.

One of the many fascinating aspects of this diver’s accident is the super-rapid, and hopefully full, recovery. He should be on the surface by now, but I doubt they will let him join his mates at the pub this afternoon.

For some reason I type hyperthermia when I am thinking hypothermia. I suppose I should be thankful though. It is amazing anything decipherable hits the screen with my pathetic keyboard skills. Correction made (again) :blush:. Thanks.

Bombay High
September 30th, 2012, 04:03 PM
For some reason I type hyperthermia when I am thinking hypothermia. I suppose I should be thankful though. It is amazing anything decipherable hits the screen with my pathetic keyboard skills. Correction made (again) :blush:. Thanks.

Not that any of us think that you would make that mistake ... its just that in a diving world a diver would most likely encounter HYPERthermia during blow downs ... or the horrifying incidents you mentioned. I think that is by far the worst death you could suffer ... i'd MUCH rather freeze to death.

Lwang
October 2nd, 2012, 03:04 AM
I thought this was the skin diving forum, not the hardhat forum.

Akimbo
October 2nd, 2012, 11:31 AM
I thought this was the skin diving forum, not the hardhat forum.

This is a diving accident.
He became a Scuba diver after the umbilical was cut.
Do you believe that there is nothing useful in this thread to the members of Scubaboard?
Saturation diving is not hard hat diving: http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/advanced-scuba-discussions/433006-what-do-you-call-gear.html

DandyDon
October 2nd, 2012, 12:28 PM
I thought this was the skin diving forum, not the hardhat forum.

Amazing. :shakehead:

It's Accidents & Incidents forum for divers - scuba, rebreather, surface supplied, freediver, snorkeler.

Lwang
October 3rd, 2012, 01:26 AM
Calm down hardhat sympathizers ;) Just highlighting out the animosity between the hard hats and skin divers when skin divers came about and make those robbie the robot guys look clumsy.

peterbj7
October 3rd, 2012, 01:35 AM
What does that mean in English?

DandyDon
October 3rd, 2012, 01:45 AM
Calm down hardhat sympathizers ;) Just highlighting out the animosity between the hard hats and skin divers when skin divers came about and make those robbie the robot guys look clumsy.





:whackt:

John C. Ratliff
October 3rd, 2012, 02:07 AM
Calm down hardhat sympathizers ;) Just highlighting out the animosity between the hard hats and skin divers when skin divers came about and make those robbie the robot guys look clumsy.
Mr. Wang,

What you are referencing comes straight out of Jacques Cousteau's The Silent World, where in the early 1950s he compared the divers using an aqua-lung with hard hat divers (Greek sponge divers). This is so far back in the history of scuba diving that it really does not apply today.

Today's commercial divers are versed in all phases of diving, including scuba. These are the "ultimate" divers, and what happens to them is important to all divers. This particular incident shows remarkable courage, and a great deal of teamwork in order to save this diver. I would also like to say that there is not animosity toward commercial divers that I know of, except for your post. All the divers I know have the utmost respect for commercial divers, as these divers dive in circumstance and routinely use equipment most of us only dream using some day. These aren't the "robie the robot guys" who are clumsy, but guys who do the very difficult, tough, cold and dangerous work at depths up to probably 1000 feet, using saturation techniques that the U.S. Navy, Cousteau, Hannes Keller, Dr. Bond, Dr. Lambertson and many, many others have worked out over the years. They are the ultimate divers, and have my admiration for what they do routinely. That this man survived is indeed remarkable, and holds lessons for us all.

SeaRat

DiveTheGalapagos
October 3rd, 2012, 02:11 AM
Never had any tech diving desires, but this story is miraculous and this thread has been a fascinating read. 9 years with no fatalities in the North Sea seems like another miracle.

Lwang
October 3rd, 2012, 02:22 AM
Mr. Wang,

What you are referencing comes straight out of Jacques Cousteau's The Silent World, where in the early 1950s he compared the divers using an aqua-lung with hard hat divers (Greek sponge divers). This is so far back in the history of scuba diving that it really does not apply today.

Today's commercial divers are versed in all phases of diving, including scuba. These are the "ultimate" divers, and what happens to them is important to all divers. This particular incident shows remarkable courage, and a great deal of teamwork in order to save this diver. I would also like to say that there is not animosity toward commercial divers that I know of, except for your post. All the divers I know have the utmost respect for commercial divers, as these divers dive in circumstance and routinely use equipment most of us only dream using some day. These aren't the "robie the robot guys" who are clumsy, but guys who do the very difficult, tough, cold and dangerous work at depths up to probably 1000 feet, using saturation techniques that the U.S. Navy, Cousteau, Hannes Keller, Dr. Bond, Dr. Lambertson and many, many others have worked out over the years. They are the ultimate divers, and have my admiration for what they do routinely. That this man survived is indeed remarkable, and holds lessons for us all.

SeaRat

Mr Rat,

LOL, been watching too many episodes of Sea Hunt. Seriously though, amazing that he survived such accident, and they are doing it as part of their everyday job.

John C. Ratliff
October 3rd, 2012, 12:02 PM
Mr Rat,

LOL, been watching too many episodes of Sea Hunt. Seriously though, amazing that he survived such accident, and they are doing it as part of their everyday job.

Mr. Wang, thanks for clarifying. IALOL (I also laughed out loud) at your reply. When I was going through the U.S. Navy School for Underwater Swimmers in 1967, we would receive at a minimum 20 push-ups for doing anything identified with Mike Nelson, especially putting our mask on our forehead. To this day, I have difficulty putting my mask on my forehead. Those push-ups were to be done immediately, in whatever equipment configuration I had on at that moment. If we were wearing our twin AL 90s, that meant doing 20 push-ups with over 50 pounds on our backs. Mike Nelson was a TV hero, and not a real-life person who knew much about diving (Lloyd Bridges had stand-ins for the difficult diving work). Some of what he stated was in error, and made for TV. Saying that, I watched those episodes in real time as a teenager awaiting the time to swim on the YMCA Swim Team in Salem, Oregon. If you are interested in vintage diving, we have a very active vintage diving community forum here for Vintage Equipment Diving (http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/vintage-equipment-diving/).

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y76/yaquinaguy/UnderwaterSwimExit.jpg
Note the masks still down as these two U.S. Naval School for Underwater Swimmers exit off Key West, FL in 1967 after a 1500 yard underwater compass swim.

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y76/yaquinaguy/Lloydb_11.jpg
Now, note Lloyd Bridges in his balsa wood tanks taking on the bad guy.

Commercial divers like this dive were at 80 meters working out of a bell, that's working at 260+ feet. They deserve our respect, as they are the ones who are keeping a lot of the oil rigs going.

SeaRat

Akimbo
October 3rd, 2012, 01:40 PM
… When I was going through the U.S. Navy School for Underwater Swimmers in 1967, we would receive at a minimum 20 push-ups for doing anything identified with Mike Nelson, especially putting our mask on our forehead…

Yeah, and for rust on your K-Bar (knife), being too slow, not using a slip release on double-D-rings, or putting your fins on backwards… there was no right or left fin but it was all the excuse needed to make you do push-ups. Ahh, the good old days :(


… Mike Nelson was a TV hero, and not a real-life person who knew much about diving (Lloyd Bridges had stand-ins for the difficult diving work). Some of what he stated was in error, and made for TV. …

That’s exactly what I though until this experience: http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/scuba-diving-tv-movies/397310-seahunt-tv-show-last-episode-aired-50-years-ago-today.html#post6058791

Granted he was not a diver when he was hired for Sea Hunt, but apparently he learned a lot and continued diving for many years. I suppose the rumor that he was just a “Hollywood pretty boy diver” became a convenient explanation for the “dramatic license” that laced every episode. I would want twin 50’s made of Balsa wood by the fifth take too! ;)

Bombay High
October 4th, 2012, 08:28 AM
Akimbo, I was going to PM you with this, but I thought others might be interested. Please note wind speed and sea state -

INCIDENT TIMELINE: Bibby Offshore DSV Loses DP in 30 knots with divers below




Bibby Topaz:
Incident Date: 18/09/12.
Weather conditions: 30 knots, 316° Sea State: 5

The dive team of two men on the sea bed and a further man in the diving bell were carrying out testing within a subsea structure.

At 22.10 a series of alarms activated in the vessels wheelhouse in relation to the Dynamic Positioning (DP) system. The amber alarm was initiated by the Bridge and Dive Control was informed that the vessel had a problem with the DP System.

The Dive Supervisor immediately ordered the Divers to leave the structure and head back to the diving bell. Both divers had left the structure and were on top of the drilling template structure when there was loss of position by the vessel and it started to drift off location. The red light alarm was initiated; Dive control was informed and both divers instructed to get back to the bell stage as soon as and as safely as possible.

At this point Diver 2 noticed his umbilical had been snagged on the side of the subsea structure close to the top. He began trying to free his umbilical and requested slack.

At approximately 22:12 hrs, with the vessel still drifting all communications and video was lost to Diver 2. On the Bridge the DP operator, Chief Officer and Master were trying to regain control of the vessel by manual operation of the thrusters.

The Bridge was in communication with dive control and was informed that Diver 1 was safely back on the bell stage and that Diver 2’s umbilical had been severed. At this point Diver 2 had reverted to his standby breathing gas supply.

At 22.17 hrs the Bridge team had regained control of the vessel having drifted off approx 240m and made heading back towards a position directly above the subsea structure. The vessel was being driven manually by the Master.

The team monitored Diver 2’s locator beacon; this was seen to be located on top of the structure. The Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) headed back towards the drilling template and confirmed Diver 2’s location on top of the drilling template structure.

At 22:40 hrs the vessel was back in a position close to the drilling template. The bell was lowered as close as possible above the structure to assist with the recovery of Diver 2.

Diver 1 left the bell stage to begin recovery of Diver 2 back to the bell with the ROV closely monitoring the operation. Both Divers were on the bell stage at 22:46 hrs, with Diver 2 being recovered into the bell at 22:48 hrs.

With Diver 2 safely recovered into the bell the Bellman (Diver 3) reported that Diver 2 was unconscious but breathing. However as soon as his diving helmet was removed Diver 2 regained consciousness and was provided with hot water to his suit to warm him up.

The bell, bell umbilical and the bell wires were surveyed by the ROV for signs of damage that could potentially impede the safe recovery of the bell. Once this was complete the bell was recovered as per normal procedure. All Divers were transferred to the chamber system and treatment was provided to Diver 2 which included being put on therapeutic oxygen.

The Medic was in attendance in saturation control and communication was also established with the shore side Diving Doctor. After consultation with the medical team a routine decompression schedule of the dive team commenced.

Decompression was completed on the 22nd September following which all Divers were given a thorough check by a doctor. Diver 2 also attended hospital for further checks on 23rd September and all Divers have received a clean bill of health.

Bibby Offshore would like to praise the skill, professionalism and expertise of the crew of the Bibby Topaz in carrying out the safe recovery of Diver 2.


---------- Post Merged at 05:58 PM ---------- Previous Post was at 05:56 PM ----------


Calm down hardhat sympathizers ;) Just highlighting out the animosity between the hard hats and skin divers when skin divers came about and make those robbie the robot guys look clumsy.

You sure your name ends with a 'G' not a 'K' ?

Akimbo
October 4th, 2012, 11:38 AM
…Decompression was completed on the 22nd September following which all Divers were given a thorough check by a doctor. Diver 2 also attended hospital for further checks on 23rd September and all Divers have received a clean bill of health…

:banana: :bounce3: :dance3: :luxhello: :yeahbaby:

That's what we been wait'n for! (US-centric slang)


…Weather conditions: 30 knots, 316° Sea State: 5…

Welcome to another work day in the North Sea


[B]Degree

Height (m)

Description




no wave

Calm (Glassy)



1

0 - 0.10

Calm (Rippled)



2

0.10 - 0.50

Smooth



3

0.50 - 1.25

Slight



4

1.25 - 2.50

Moderate



5

2.50 - 4.00 (8.2' – 13.1')

Rough



6

4.00 - 6.00

Very Rough



7

6.00 - 9.00

High



8

9.00 - 14.00

Very High



9

14.00+

Phenomenal




This incident has the potential to be one of the greatest learning exercises in the last 20 years for saturation diving.

Bombay High
October 4th, 2012, 12:48 PM
This incident has the potential to be one of the greatest learning exercises in the last 20 years for saturation diving.

Absolutely ... and considering that a lot of the lessons learnt in the past paid a very high price in terms of lives lost, this one is a very very cheap lesson. Some butt clenching moments for all involved.
I think there may be a move to have captains train for non computer aided positioning just to deal with these kind of situations.
Sobering thought, that a few more minutes may have ended Chris' life.

Akimbo
October 4th, 2012, 01:19 PM
…I think there may be a move to have captains train for non computer aided positioning just to deal with these kind of situations...

Is there such a thing? Even using a manual joy-stick requires a computer to translate signals to the mains and thrusters doesn’t it??? I suppose they could head into the weather and run mostly on the mains, but even that could move the moonpool off station 150' or more.

Have you ever been aboard when DP (Dynamic Positioning) was lost? I would think that it would be pretty rare these days (not that constant vigilance and failure procedures are not essential).

BTW, thanks again for the news. You have made my day.

Bombay High
October 5th, 2012, 03:59 AM
BTW, thanks again for the news. You have made my day.

Made my day as well :-)

---------- Post Merged at 01:26 PM ---------- Previous Post was at 01:23 PM ----------




Have you ever been aboard when DP (Dynamic Positioning) was lost? I would think that it would be pretty rare these days (not that constant vigilance and failure procedures are not essential).



I haven't, but I have met personally a few who have been. They were all fortunate in the fact that they didn't have crazy weather (30 KTS and 4 meter seas). Always curls my toes thinking about it.

---------- Post Merged at 01:29 PM ---------- Previous Post was at 01:23 PM ----------


Is there such a thing? Even using a manual joy-stick requires a computer to translate signals to the mains and thrusters doesn’t it??? I suppose they could head into the weather and run mostly on the mains, but even that could move the moonpool off station 150' or more.
.

I am no expert, but I have heard of guys training to operate the thrusters manually by joystick, but I suppose if all electronics went down, you are in big trouble anyway.

Bombay High
October 22nd, 2012, 08:13 AM
Akimbo,
I have the post enquiry incident report from Bibby. Its fantastic, and represent a great new trend in the industry of transparent sharing of info. Its in Power Point. I dont know how to upload it. Should I email it to you?

---------- Post Merged at 05:43 PM ---------- Previous Post was at 05:41 PM ----------

BTW - I also have Technips presentation on the new rebreather - again in Power Point :shakehead:

DCBC
October 22nd, 2012, 10:18 AM
Likely it was a Divex SLS Mk IV. This is commonly used in Sat Diving. It provides 13 1/2 mins. of warm gas/hot water at 400M, or 26 mins. at 150M and is used with the UltraJewel 601 Reclaim Helmet. It obviously was enough to save his life...

For those interested, it's a semi-closed circuit rebreather.


28 minutes is a really long time below 250'! Any idea what bailout system was used? Hard to imagine being that cold and living — hot water suits fit like coveralls for someone twice your size so you may as well be naked when the water stops.

Searcaigh
October 22nd, 2012, 10:51 AM
Very nice better than the 15L steel with 16% HeO2 bail out bottle that I used back in the 80s

DCBC
October 22nd, 2012, 10:55 AM
Or doing the dive with a 1944 Morris Mark V Hat and Dress that I used in the early 70's when I was in the Navy... Man things have changed!


Very nice better than the 15L steel with 16% HeO2 bail out bottle that I used back in the 80s

Bombay High
October 22nd, 2012, 11:18 AM
Wayne,
This one is different. Its going to change a lot of things. They will do away with the hot water suit. The Umbilical will become thinner. The heat will be routed through the rebreather, so that you get heat supplied to the suit, you get warm gas, and supplies will last an hour in the event of Umbilical separation. You also do not need the Jewel on your hat anymore. The reclaim unit will be on your back. Sounds fantastic. I cant figure if a Power Point file can be uploaded.

---------- Post Merged at 08:48 PM ---------- Previous Post was at 08:43 PM ----------

HeaderandFooter(View)

u Technip / Statoil PDE Development
​ Goals obtained for Rebreather
– The PDE consists of following components
• PassiveRebreatherdevelopedwitha“reclaimefficiency” of>95%• ElectronicallymanagedtoEN61508standardforSIL4
• State-of-the-futuremonitoringandcommunicationsystem
• MUXconnectiontosurfacewithallelectronicread-out
​ Goals obtained umbilical
– Single composite umbilical with 1” diameter
• Gas,oxygen,fibreopticsandtwistedpairs• FunctionsasSafetylinewith350kg.SWL
​ Goals obtained suit
– Actively heated Dry Suit
• VikingSuit
• Activelyheatedundersuitcontrolledthroughtherebreat herMUX

Cost efficiency
​ The system removes equipment


– With the system, no need for diver reclaim
• Simplificationofthebell
• Simplificationofdivecontrol

– With the system, smaller umbilicals• Simplificationofthebells
• Simplificationofsliprings

– With the system, Reduced Hot Water• Minimizedcorrosionproblems

– With the system, lower maintenance cost

file:///page1image4456

DCBC
October 22nd, 2012, 11:39 AM
My old employer, Global Industries was researching a similar system with a Norwegian company in 2002. I don't know if that project was ever completed (they were purchased by Technip last year) becoming the largest underwater commercial operation on the planet. It sure would free-up some space in the Bell if they could miniaturize the unit. When all's said and done, I've got a lot of confidence in the SLS and the UltraJewel. As you know, confidence is everything when it comes to equipment.

Akimbo
October 22nd, 2012, 12:15 PM
…. Its in Power Point. I dont know how to upload it. Should I email it to you?...

Received, thanks. You can upload Power Point [-].pps[/-] .ppt, but not [-].ppt[/-] .pps extensions. Maybe the moderators can add it?

As indicated in my E-mail reply, I am very skeptical but hopeful that I am proven wrong. Unfortunately, only the simplest brute-force technologies seam reliable offshore — let alone the underwater work environment.

No matter how advanced a drysuit and rebreather becomes, what good is it if you can’t keep the diver’s hands warm enough to work? You couldn’t even get out of the bell without punching holes in a dry glove. Sure you could make super tough dry gloves… but pretty soon they are more like these:

138796

HowardE
October 22nd, 2012, 02:35 PM
Received, thanks. You can upload Power Point [-].pps[/-] .ppt, but not [-].ppt[/-] .pps extensions. Maybe the moderators can add it?



Now you can... ;)

Akimbo
October 22nd, 2012, 08:41 PM
Likely it was a Divex SLS Mk IV. This is commonly used in Sat Diving. It provides 13 1/2 mins. of warm gas/hot water at 400M, or 26 mins. at 150M and is used with the UltraJewel 601 Reclaim Helmet. It obviously was enough to save his life...

For those interested, it's a semi-closed circuit rebreather.

How does it deliver warm gas and hot water with a severed umbilical??? You get some exothermic heat from the absorbent but not much. Check my math but 2½ gallons/minute at 110° F (typical hot water suit requirement) is around 1,400 BTU/Minute starting with 45° water.

It will be interesting to learn what rig he was on and if any gas was left.

Bombay High
October 22nd, 2012, 11:00 PM
the file size is too large !

DCBC
October 23rd, 2012, 01:19 PM
It doesn't. If the Hot Water umbilical is severed, you're screwed. At DCIEM we experimented with a closed-circuit hot water suit and a device that would circulate and heat water and deliver a limited amount to the core in an emergency, but it wasn't deemed successful. With the SLS even the mix is heated (to approx 70 degrees F) using the hot-water input.

If this Diver was following procedure, he should have attempted to go back to the Bell and not just wait. I realize that this isn't always possible, but that would be the first priority.

From the IMCA Supervisor's Manual:

42 Loss of Hot Water

42.1 If the hot water system fails the diver must start his return to the bell immediately. If he is breathing
heliox he will start to suffer from hypothermia in a matter of minutes.

42.2 While he is returning to the bell he should be adequately supplied by the head of water in the
umbilical and by water remaining in the boiler. This may need to be mixed with cold water manually to
supply water at the correct temperature. The surface crew should meanwhile be switching over to a
back-up heating system or back-up machine. Back-up heating may be provided by on-board steam.

43 Loss of Gas Supply – Diver

43.1 The diver will start to return to the bell immediately. Before turning on his bail-out he must check
that there is no risk of losing his gas through a free flow. The Diving Supervisor will be monitoring the
diver’s breathing and if he notices any significant changes he will alert the bellman.

43.2 If the problem has arisen in the diver’s gas supply to the bell, the bellman will be warned by the
changeover valve switching over to the on-board supply. He should notify the diver and Diving
Supervisor and the diver should return to the bell.


How does it deliver warm gas and hot water with a severed umbilical??? You get some exothermic heat from the absorbent but not much. Check my math but 2½ gallons/minute at 110° F (typical hot water suit requirement) is around 1,400 BTU/Minute starting with 45° water.

It will be interesting to learn what rig he was on and if any gas was left.

Akimbo
October 23rd, 2012, 07:50 PM
It doesn't. If the Hot Water umbilical is severed, you're screwed. At DCIEM we experimented with a closed-circuit hot water suit and a device that would circulate and heat water and deliver a limited amount to the core in an emergency, but it wasn't deemed successful. With the SLS even the mix is heated (to approx 70 degrees F) using the hot-water input….

I am surprised the gas heats to such a low temperature. The gas heaters used below 600' in the 1970s heated to 85°.


…If this Diver was following procedure, he should have attempted to go back to the Bell and not just wait. I realize that this isn't always possible, but that would be the first priority.

From the IMCA Supervisor's Manual:….

From what little I know, it makes sense that he didn’t (or maybe couldn’t). They knew where he was working on the structure when the umbilical was severed and he knew the there was no chance of finding the bell. I don’t recall what time of day it was but I imagine not seeing lights on the bell is a good indicator to stay put.

John C. Ratliff
October 23rd, 2012, 09:02 PM
I am going to agree with Akimbo on this one; he had lost his umbilical lines, and was on his emergency gas. He knew where he was, and the tender inside the bell knew his last location. If he had swam out to try to find the bell, he could have become disoriented an lost. The bell, upon return, would not have found him, and he could not have found the bell on his own. His response was the only hope he had of being found, and only through teamwork and a bit of luck was he able to survive. Had he made any other decisions, he most probably would have been lost.

SeaRat

Bombay High
October 23rd, 2012, 11:21 PM
With a severed Umbilical, and the bell being pulled half a kilometre away, this was, I think, his only hope of being found - and the transponder helped :-)

DCBC
October 24th, 2012, 09:02 AM
I am surprised the gas heats to such a low temperature. The gas heaters used below 600' in the 1970s heated to 85°.

The thermal regenerator of the Divex SLS is situated beside the canister. It is a passive device which recovers heat from the exhaled gas passing to the counterlungs. It uses this heat to pre-heat the gas passing from the counterlungs back to the diver. Such a system certainly has its limitations (especially if the hot-water umbilical is severed), but any heat is better than nothing. Don't you think?

Diver’s respiratory heat loss increases with depth, as the density of the breathing gas increases. By IMCA policy, there must be gas heating for divers deeper than 150 msw (495 fsw). At 200 msw (660 fsw) the gas should be supplied at a temperature of about 75°F and at 300msw (984 fsw) 80°F.


From what little I know, it makes sense that he didn’t (or maybe couldn’t). They knew where he was working on the structure when the umbilical was severed and he knew the there was no chance of finding the bell. I don’t recall what time of day it was but I imagine not seeing lights on the bell is a good indicator to stay put.

Under the circumstances I agree. My point was that in the description he stated that he was "following safety procedures" and stayed where he was. In-fact his training told him to do the opposite i.e. get back to the bell and not stay where he was.

""The red light alarm was initiated; dive control was informed and both divers instructed to get back to the bell stage as soon as and as safely as possible." It would seem however that he had no choice. One lucky guy!

Akimbo
October 24th, 2012, 11:42 AM
… I think, his only hope of being found - and the transponder helped :-)

I would like to know more about the transponder if anyone runs across the info.


Always on or manually turned on in an emergency?
Does it have an operational use? Helping a ROV find the working diver maybe?
Acoustic and/or strobe light?
Umbilical powered with emergency battery or do they have to keep them charged?
Is it stand-alone or built into the diver’s helmet mounted light or TV camera?


Man, this incident is fascinating and haunting at the same time.

d_lafleur
October 24th, 2012, 04:01 PM
This has been a great read, for the Rec. Tec. and a fellow offshore worker point of view.

Cool heads survive.

Does anyone know if the DSP (Dive Support Vessel) was DP1 or DP2? We have both, with which the DP2 have two systems which allow the crew to select the "working one" in an incident.

Akimbo
October 24th, 2012, 05:35 PM
Looks like DP II

http://www.bibbyoffshore.com/downloads/BIBBY_TOPAZ(1).pdf

Bombay High
October 24th, 2012, 11:43 PM
I would like to know more about the transponder if anyone runs across the info.


Always on or manually turned on in an emergency?
Does it have an operational use? Helping a ROV find the working diver maybe?
Acoustic and/or strobe light?
Umbilical powered with emergency battery or do they have to keep them charged?
Is it stand-alone or built into the diver’s helmet mounted light or TV camera?


Man, this incident is fascinating and haunting at the same time.

This is what they are using:


http://www.km.kongsberg.com/ks/web/nokbg0397.nsf/AllWeb/1B58E93D7B3A1061C1256C370047D8D7/$file/164508ad_HiPAP500_Brochure_lr.pdf?OpenElement

http://www.km.kongsberg.com/ks/web/n...D?OpenDocument (http://www.km.kongsberg.com/ks/web/nokbg0240.nsf/AllWeb/F82743DED767CC65C1256B82002DEDBD?OpenDocument)

d_lafleur
October 25th, 2012, 08:32 AM
I am going to take a poll of our marine vessel people to find out how often we have had any type of DP I or II go "off site" and how far they had to go. I would assume, it doesnt happen often.

Akimbo
October 26th, 2012, 03:53 PM
I found a copy of the Bibby Topaz Incident Summary that Bombay High sent to me:

Incident summary 08.10.12 "Bibby Topaz" (http://www.slideshare.net/arturovillazongranda/incident-summary-081012-bibby-topaz)

Here is the Rebreather Bailout File:

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=personal%20diving%20equipment%20technip&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CCQQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nui.no%2Fsitefiles%2F22%2FDyk keseminar%2FMikalLothe.ppt&ei=m-qKUPq-GIXWygHq-YBg&usg=AFQjCNEZmkhpbt2gOfZmjKhCngsaT5A2NQ&cad=rja

John C. Ratliff
October 27th, 2012, 04:58 PM
Akimbo, thank you for providing these presentations. I was especially interested in the top PowerPoint titled "DSV Bippy Topez Incident 18 September 2012." I was especially interested in the safety aspects, as I am a safety professional with 35 years of experience, but not in the diving industry. My diving has been either military, instructional, or sport (currently). The British system with the Health and Safety Executive is the equivalent of our OSHA, except that I think the British Health and Safety Executive is in some ways more advanced.

In the presentation, they mentioned some things that I don't think the divers are aware of, and so I will provide a bit of commentary about them. These are product safety concepts, and even some safety professionals are not thoroughly aware of these tools.

FMEA
This is what we call a "Failure Modes and Effects Analysis". It looks at each component in a system, and in tabular format shows the "Component Name and Number," its "Function," the "Faulure Mode and Cause," the "Failure Effect On" "Next Higher Item" and End Item Product," the "Probability of Failure" (lambda to the 0.000001 power), and the "Corrective Action Available or Recommended." This analysis is done item by item within a system. It is an intensive and very productive way of looking at failures or failure potentials. It is best done as a preventive exercise, which occurs in Process Safety Management systems (mostly with chemicals and oil systems).


The FMEA can provide the following functions:

1. Systematic review of component failure modes to ensure that any failure produces minimal damage to the product.
2. Determining the effects that such failures will have on other items in the product and their functions.
3. Determining those parts whose failures would have critical effects on product operations, thus producing the greatest damage, and which failure modes will generate these damaging effects.
4. Calculating the probabilities of failure in assemblies, subassemblies, and products from the individual failure probabilities of their components and the arrangements in which they have been designed. Since components have more than one failure mode, the probability that one will fail at all is the total probability of all failure modes. One or more of these modes may be one that can generate an accident, whereas the others will not. Each mode must therefore be considered separately.
5. Establishing test program requirements to determine failure mode and rate data not available from other sources.
6. Establishing test program requirements to verify empirical reliability predictions.
7. Providing input data for trade-off studies to establish the effectiveness of changes in a proposed product or to determine the probable effect of modifications on an existing product.
8. Determining how probabilities of failure of components, assemblies, and the product can be reduced by using high reliability compenents, redundacies in design, or both.
9. Eliminating or minimizing the adverse effects that assembly failures could generate and indiating safeguardsto be incorporated if products cannot be made fail-safe or brought within acceptable failure limits.

In its original usages, failure modes and effects analysis determined where improvements in component life or design were necessary; and because failure intervals and probabilities wer estimated, maintenance periods and requirements could be established. FMEA has proven effective for both purposes. Deficiencies can be eliminated or minimized through design changes, redundancies, incorporation of fail-safe features, closer control of critical characteristics during manufacture and use, and extra care at the facilities of the subcontractors or users.

Effects of human actions on the product are not generally included in failure modes and effects analysis; these effects are considered to be the province of human engineering. Bioenvironmetal engineering is another area of investigation considered only from the standpoint of analyzing equipment required for environment control for failure modes and rates...
Hamar, Willie, Product Safety Management and Engineering, Second Edition, American Society of Safety Engineers, 1993, pages 151-153

FMECA (Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis)


Certain components or assemblies in any product are especially cricital to the product's mission and the well-being of its operators. THerefore, they should be given special attention and should be analyzed more thoroughly than others. Which compenonts are critical can be established through experience or as the products of analyses...
IBID, page 153.


These are what in the semiconductor industry are known as "safety critical" components.

CE Mark

In order to gain a "CE Mark" these types of analyses and a third-party review needs to be completed. Without this CE Mark, the product cannot be sold in the European Community.

It appears that all concerned are taking this near-fatal accident very seriously, and proceeding with due diligence.

SeaRat
John C. Ratliff, CSP, CIH, MSPH

Akimbo
October 27th, 2012, 07:05 PM
DNV (Det Norske Veritas) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Det_Norske_Veritas) required a formal failure mode analysis for diving systems installed on Norwegian flag vessels since the mid-1970s. The US Navy also used it on the Mark II Deep Dive System in the early 70s. In both cases, we submitted reports which engineers analyzed and asked questions until the safety criteria was met.

The “simplified summary” came down to three or more failures before life support failure — besides pressure vessel failure which had their own certification procedure analogous to ASME-PVHO (American Society of Mechanical Engineers – Pressure Vessels for Human Occupancy). The Bibby Topaz is a DNV vessel.

DNV has some pretty thorough specifications regarding all aspects of diving system design, in addition to the vessel itself. They helped form the Norwegian Underwater Institute (NUI) in 1976, now the Norwegian Underwater Technology Centre (Nutec) (http://www.nui.no/en/about-nui/history/). Most of my work was in the Norwegian Sector for Norwegian clients so didn’t work with HSE. I understand both are far more enlightened than OSHA in this area. You can be sure that this incident summary isn’t the last to be written.

Even in the first generation DSVs (Diving Support Vessels), DNV certification was very rigorous. I was aboard the first DNV certified DSV and worked on the second. The DP computer had a dedicated compartment behind the bridge with a DEC VAX computer in a RETMA rack about 7' tall. These DP systems were also made by Kongsberg. There are kitchen appliances with more computing power now! Three acoustic transduces were placed on the bottom and the system triangulated off them. They were about 8" in diameter and 6' tall plus the stand.

Even though DP had been used for years on floaters (floating drilling ships and platforms), there was no diver risk to speak of. The idea of using DP with divers locked out about 22/7 for about 11 months/year was met with more than a little trepidation! Drill ships were more than 400' while early DSVs were 200-250' long. Damn if it didn’t work better than four-point mooring that it replaced. This is the first “incident” of any kind I am aware of DP failure — not that there have not been DP failures, just no damage or injuries. These ships operate within 50' of fixed and semisubmersible platforms all the time. We fully expected serious collisions to be pretty common. Glad we were wrong!

DCBC
October 28th, 2012, 08:12 AM
For those who don't know about DP, I thought that a bit of background might be helpful. Dynamic Positioning (DP) is defined as "a system which automatically controls a vessel's position and heading exclusively by means of active thrust." Vessels using moorings (without active DP) have a number of advantages including economy (no active use of thrusters/engines that burn fuel). It is sometimes however the best option for many operations to use DP because the seabed can become cluttered with pipelines and other hardware (laying anchors has a high risk of damage to pipelines or wellheads). The option to moor to a platform rather than the seabed is also less frequent, because support vessels have become larger and platforms are not designed for the loads that can be placed in the mooring lines. There is also a risk that the DP vessel will make contact with a platform.

DNV isn't the only society in the game when it comes to defining class notations for DP-capable vessels. The notations from each of the societies vary, but refer to the compliance with the equipment classes. The societies include the LLoyd's Register, DNV and ABS (the American Bureau of Shipping).

Dynamic Positioning (DP) classifications can be confusing, so to clarify in basic terms, the equipment classes are:

Class 1 - refers to non-redundant vessels (providing automatic and manual position/heading control under specified maximum environmental conditions)

Class 2 - relates to vessels with full redundancy of systems and equipment (automatic and manual position/heading control under specified maximum environmental conditions, during and following any single fault excluding loss of a compartment and equipped with two independent computer systems); and

Class 3 - must be able to withstand the loss of all systems in any one compartment from the effects of fire or flooding (automatic and manual position/heading control under specified maximum environmental conditions, during and following any single fault excluding loss of a compartment and equipped with two independent computer systems with a separate back-up system [physically separated].

The certification process is extensive and subject to annual review. Operators also must be qualified and a DPO (Dynamic Positioning Officer) must be "on watch" whenever the DP is active. (in addition to the normal bridge crew).

d_lafleur
October 29th, 2012, 11:42 AM
After visiting with my marine vessel people, it appears DP I and II that we use tend to go "offsite" more often than not. As a matter of practice DP is not allowed for some critical operations due to inherent issues. In these situations the captains are required to manually control the vessel. The preferance is "anchored spreads" were it is possible.

Still an amazing story, team seperation, diver actions, search and rescue, and final recovery.

Bombay High
October 31st, 2012, 02:05 PM
As Akimbo stated,
Although this accident happened under HSE jurisdiction, the Norwegians are looking hard into the matter. Whats great is the fact that information is being shared across the board. Between Bibby, HSE, Norway and the Divers Association. No one is trying to brush things under the carpet, as was the knee jerk reaction in the past. Everyone is looking to make this a positive learning experience, and to see that it doesn't happen again. It is a really positive step.

Stephan_DE
July 6th, 2013, 06:06 PM
............. 9 years with no fatalities in the North Sea seems like another miracle.


plz, dont hurt me for recovering these old Thread!
I know about two Incidents in the Northsea. One at May 2012 and one July 2010. Both ended tragically. RIP!

1st Incident was a Heartattack in -2m at Windpark alpha ventus and the 2nd was a Umbillical severed in -40m in the Windfarm Bard Offshore 1!

Greetings from Germany

Stephan

Stephan_DE
July 16th, 2013, 07:21 AM
And one more! RIP!


13. Juli 2013

A British diver killed during underwater work in the offshore wind farm "Riffgat" Borkum. The 26-year-old had been buried in 20 meters depth by a concrete mat, said police.

The mats were spread for weighting of supply cables on the seabed. Immediately initiated resuscitation attempts were unsuccessful. The diving support vessel with the corpse of the victim with more information in on the way to Emden. There started the investigation for the accident.

The diver and his comrad wanted to bring the concrete mat in position, according to the energy supplier EWE Oldenburg.
Then he had fallen under the mat. An emergency doctor who was brought from a rescue boat to the scene, could only diagnose the death of the diver. Also a rescue helicopter was in use.

EWE and the project developer Enova build the wind farm "Riffgat" with 30 plants since mid-2012. In addition to the water police and the labor inspectorate in Oldenburg as the licensing authority was informed about the incident. In recent years, there had been several fatal accidents with divers in offshore wind farms in the North Sea. The work up to 40 meters deep water are considered dangerous because they are hampered by strong currents, poor visibility and waves.





Also thanks to DandyDon

http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/accidents-incidents/460073-british-fatality-wind-farm-germany.html




RIP

Heliumthief
March 16th, 2014, 08:49 PM
Wow..A lot of posts, and a lot of 'presumtion'....for the record, I was in Sat on the Topaz that evening, and was setting up to enjoy a shift 'off' due to weather, when that came over the comms... Bottom line. Only bullet points: DP computer went mad ( like never before) both divers were instructed to get on top of the structure (standard procedure on an Amber DP alarm) both divers got on top of the stucture, but CL got his umbilical caught up on a transponder beacon that shouldnt have been there... To begin with, he was being pulled to the 'foul point' and braced against it, as it would have meant he would have been minced in the gap...his umbilical parted, he fell to the seabed, and Diver DY got back to the bell...CL, alone in a way that noone else could comprehend, staggered around the seabed a little, and run into. Down line that we had attached to the manifold. He climbed to the top and waited.... The Captain and 1st Officer did an amaizing job, moving the vessel back to the area, athe ROV pilot did something amazing, by eyeballing him, a good 400m before the boat saw him, then...well I saw what Diver DY did, and, well, I don't think many divers in the North Sea could do the rescue he did...
anyways, upshotwasMe and my bell partner KC recieved him, and treated him.. He apologised profusely for ruining everyones Sat, but then that's the kinda guy he is...still a diver on the Topaz, despite the many reccomendations to take an insurance payout... The boy is an isperation to me..one thing I remeber most..he felt the need to tell me about his feelings down there, and at one point told me "S98...It's not that bad... It's sad, bacause everybody that loves you will be sad,....but it's not too hard....
apart from not being able to get a line into him, that is something that will always be with me...

Tom Winters
March 16th, 2014, 11:10 PM
18 minutes for an adult is The True Second Chance. Kids have survived some hellacious immersions, in cold water due to the mammalian reflex response, but adults?

Not this long. I don't think the guy is gonna do the New York Times crossword puzzles in record-setting times from here on out, but he'll be able to wipe his own ....ah, you get it.... for a good long time, and that's a good thing.

bowlofpetunias
March 17th, 2014, 03:16 AM
Information is that he has recovered totally and is back at work see previous post.

This is also an interesting case that may shed some light on why he survived and the role keeping a clear head played in his survival.

Anna Bågenholm - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_B%C3%A5genholm)

Dive Reflex (http://www.thesurvivaldoctor.com/2012/01/26/dive-reflex/)

victor
March 17th, 2014, 04:45 AM
Wow, that must one calm individual. 80m for 40 minutes on a single tank, how big was the tank, I cannot imagine it was huge. By staying calm and still, and somehow not shivering he kept his air consumption low while managing to stay consious just enough to hang on.
I have a lot of respect for professional divers.

Akimbo
March 17th, 2014, 11:52 AM
Heliumthief:

A lot of people here were deeply concerned for days over the fate of someone we didn’t know. It is somehow gratifying to learn that Chris Lemons is such an exceptional human being. Thanks for your post.

bowlofpetunias
March 18th, 2014, 04:17 AM
X 2 on that! We so seldom here "positive outcomes" and it is nice to know that this is one of them. Next time you run into Chris tell him he has a whole lot of supporters/fans on Scubaboard :flowers:

Jan Kruger
March 19th, 2014, 07:17 AM
Not knowing anything about this type of diving....how do they heat him after the rescue and he is not affected by the heat - causing nitrogen bubbles in his blood ? Forgive the ignorance.

Akimbo
March 19th, 2014, 11:30 AM
This explains it: What is Saturation Diving (http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/commercial-divers/467739-what-saturation-diving.html)

Jan Kruger
March 20th, 2014, 05:19 AM
Thank you . Now we also might get a slightly better idea...:cool2:

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