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rachelscott51
September 24th, 2004, 11:44 PM
I've recently gotten into geocaching and have heard, but not seen, any underwater caches. What do people know? I'm assuming this is on the rise in the U.S. and worldwide. I'm excited about the prospect!

Anyone else have experience with UW geocaches?

boomx5
September 25th, 2004, 12:24 AM
I've recently gotten into geocaching and have heard, but not seen, any underwater caches. What do people know? I'm assuming this is on the rise in the U.S. and worldwide. I'm excited about the prospect!

Anyone else have experience with UW geocaches?

I've never seen underwater caches yet, but I've heard they're out there. I should take some time and plant a couple. I just need to sit down and figure out how I'm going to do it.

jonnythan
September 25th, 2004, 01:04 AM
I know of at least one, and it's in Kingston, placed there by one of our very own..

Mike Veitch
September 25th, 2004, 01:49 AM
Maybe i'm a little slow but what is a geocache?

jonnythan
September 25th, 2004, 01:52 AM
www.geocaching.com

With the advent of cheap handheld GPS units, people have taken to putting little treasure boxes (usually tupperware containers with a notepad and some various cute, cheap items) and logging their coordinates on this web site. Basically, if you want to get into it, you find geocaches near where you live using their search function, then input the coordinates into your GPS unit and go a-huntin. When you find the cache, you take an item, leave an item, and log your find on the web site. You can place your own caches.

They're doing very interesting things with traveling caches, traveling items, mystery caches, multicaches.... lots of fun though, and it gets you outside or gives you something to do during the SI ;)

rachelscott51
September 25th, 2004, 01:59 AM
A geocache is a sort of treasure chest "cache" (pronounced cash) that can be found through use of a GPS and sometimes, through clues as well. You can go to different websites and they will list the caches in your area. You get a coordinate on the site that you then go out exploring to find it using your GPS. Once found, within the cache are items that can be taken, though you must replace what you take with your own little token. Often there will be a log book that you can put your name in to show you found it. You can find out more about it at www.geocaching.com and other similar websites. It's really fun and I want to get involved underwater now.

Jmaserati
September 25th, 2004, 03:50 AM
Great to see someone else shares my interest! :dazzler1:

Here's some links for ya!

Bonaire Cache:
http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?guid=5689084a-5eb2-4b51-879b-98afe322fea3

http://www.wadespage.com/D800DS07RF00.shtml

http://www.geodiving.com/

http://groups.msn.com/divergps

:crafty:

cancun mark
September 25th, 2004, 09:32 AM
I have been meaning to set some around here, but havent managed to get to it yet. I think it is a fun Idea.

(note to self: Maybe I should geo cache myself with a note that I should be sent to Monaco to live in a palace, I wonder if you are allowed to geo cache humans.)

rachelscott51
September 28th, 2004, 03:20 PM
Besides clues from shore from a GPS point, how else would you go about setting up a scuba cache?

MSilvia
September 28th, 2004, 03:26 PM
Besides clues from shore from a GPS point, how else would you go about setting up a scuba cache?

Well, clues from non-shore coordinates comes to mind. In other words, coordinates for the boat. Since you'd have some variation due to tides and currents, you might want more detail than just the surface coordinates.

diver567
September 28th, 2004, 03:31 PM
I once found a Kermnit the frog at The Pinnacle dive site in Utila. I wasn't given any clues I just happened across it. Is the appropriate etiquette to leave the object for others to find? I presume so.

rachelscott51
September 28th, 2004, 03:37 PM
Yes, or replace with an object of your own.

ZenSquirrel
September 28th, 2004, 03:42 PM
Besides clues from shore from a GPS point, how else would you go about setting up a scuba cache?

I've toyed with this idea before and this is the best that I have come up with.

GPS does not work underwater so: You give the GPS coordinates of the water entry point. Be it from shore or from a boat. Assuming that you were from the shore you would then give a clue as to where to search next. For example, you could say that the cache is somewhere along a heading of 120 degrees. You then have to scuba along that bearing until you find the cache.

In my opinion the underwater seach would be the most fun and there a bunch of fun variation on the theme.

Easiest is to give a compass bearing, distance, and aprox depth. So you say, follow 120 degrees for 40 feet at an aprox depth of 30 feet to find the cache.

You can give just a bearing and a max depth. Follow 120 degrees. You should find the cache above 60 feet.

You can give just a distance. The cache is within 20 feet of the point.

More fun can be had by stringing nav points together. You get a number of plastic stakes and number and/or color them for easy reference then you combine the seach types. For example:

Nav 1 is 20 feet from shore.
Nav 2 is off Nav 1 at 120 degrees and is above 90 feet.
Nav 3 is within 30 feet of nav 2 and is between 60-70 feet.
Nav 4 is 40 feet away from Nav 3 along 60 degrees.

The cache is at the last stake. Or you could put a box locked with a combination lock and the numbers on the stakes are the combination. Or you have to contact the "cacher" with the proper code to get to the cache. Etc, etc.

Have not had the time/energy to actually try this. It would probably be the most fun/challenging in a murky lake. Probably not a good idea to sink a bunch of stakes into a reef.

Keith

FreeFloat
September 28th, 2004, 04:07 PM
I know of at least one, and it's in Kingston, placed there by one of our very own..
That would be me!

Waypoint GCJMTR

Kingston's First underwater Geocache - the Ambitious Snorkeller (http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?guid=e357a41d-80c8-4979-b46d-088247b9660c)

rachelscott51
September 30th, 2004, 04:32 PM
Sounds like you could also float a gps in a diver down float as well and try to triangulate where you are.

FreeFloat
September 30th, 2004, 04:42 PM
My Garmin e-Trex is waterproof to 3' or so I believe. It'll lose signal as soon as it's underwater of course, but I solved the problem by floating it in a Ziploc bag half filled with air (also because I wasn't sure if it would float or sink when left to its own devices)

If you check my cache listing, you'll see I posted the coordinates for the actual cache itself, as well as the micro..... Maybe that makes it "too easy", but all the micro contains is actual directions for how to find the cache using a dive compass, no GPS required!

FreeFloat
September 30th, 2004, 04:43 PM
Actually, re reading this thread has just given me another idea for a scuba related cache...... hehehe

Deep Lake
September 30th, 2004, 05:10 PM
I found one in Lake Coeur d Alene Idaho last summer. I talked to some locals who said that there are at least 5 of them in the lake.

rjchandler
September 30th, 2004, 05:25 PM
Wow - something to do with a GPS besides record the co-ordinates of all the Tim Horton's between here and Tobermory.

Jmaserati
September 30th, 2004, 06:20 PM
Sounds like you could also float a gps in a diver down float as well and try to triangulate where you are.


Rachel, see this link from my msg. above... I think it's kind of a fun experiment:


http://groups.msn.com/divergps

Jmaserati
September 30th, 2004, 06:21 PM
You'll need to click on the "Pictures" link to the left side.

FreeFloat
September 30th, 2004, 06:32 PM
Only works with Magellan GPSr units, not Garmins. Garmins will 'vanish' the info on the screen upon loss of signal (such as when pulled underwater) whereas Magellans will freeze the last info on the screen.

Unfortunately, most cachers I know use one or other model of Garmin, as they perform the same as Magellans (the higher end Garmins do, at least) yet cost substantially less.

Though, I saw Doppler's GPSr once, and it looked sweet...... ;)

Oh BTW, this technique has already been discussed at length on Groundspeak's forums.

rachelscott51
September 30th, 2004, 06:38 PM
Sounds like a cool way to do it. It would be nice if Garmin had that available as well. All very innovative!!!

IceFrog
October 23rd, 2004, 09:44 AM
Sounds like a cool way to do it. It would be nice if Garmin had that available as well. All very innovative!!!

Although i haven't proved this underwater, when I tried it on the surface the Garmin that I use only popped up a small message indicating that satellite reception had been lost. It didn't clear the screen. I own a Garmen eTrex Legend. (not the new color one). The message covered only the botton 1/10 to 1/8 of the screen keeping the rest of the screen fully viewable. I'll post a picture shortly to show you.

Regards,

Al Mialkovsky
October 23rd, 2004, 10:27 AM
King Kahekili (http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?ID=16119) is my favorite geocache of all times but it's inactive now as the hider didn't replace it when it washed away in a storm off of Maui. It was hidden in a sunken outrigger canoe in about 40 feet of water.

We love geoaching and have found 1181 caches so far. If it wasn't for this diving thing we could have found thousands more but I love to dive more.

But this geocaching is pretty fun.

ScubaBones
November 1st, 2004, 07:46 PM
For those that frequent the forums of geocaching.com, there is a thread I started back in October concerning Scuba Caches.

http://forums.groundspeak.com/GC/index.php?showtopic=82146

If you can't find it via the link, it is located in this forum:

Groundspeak Forums -> General Geocaching Discussions -> Geocaching Topics
"Scuba Caches, Hard to find, so listed here"

Feel free to add any to the list. I enjoy watching them and reading the logs.

--don

jmunch
April 19th, 2006, 12:22 AM
I have placed a GeoCache near the breakwater in Monterey, CA, a popular dive site. If you are interested, check out GCT98H.

We would be interested in looking for your underwater cache. Let us know if you place one.

ItsBruce
April 19th, 2006, 02:23 AM
I can put a lat/lon into my gps. But what is the designation "GCT98H"?

boomx5
April 20th, 2006, 01:08 PM
I can put a lat/lon into my gps. But what is the designation "GCT98H"?

Use that designation to look up the cache on the "geocaching.com" website.

David P
April 21st, 2006, 12:24 AM
Ive read there is one inside the hms Yukon down in san diego hidden behind a toilet. I've been excited about going to try to find it (need to look at a map and see how deep of a penetration it is first) I was just down on the Palimar last weekend, I should have left a cache but didn't even think of it. Hmm I'm going out to La Janelle Sunday....

divingislife
March 3rd, 2010, 12:06 PM
I love geocaching and am on a quest to set up some scuba caches in CO (this summer)....maybe we can make diving in this cold, land-locked state more exciting!

Guba
March 3rd, 2010, 02:31 PM
There is a geocache in Lake Travis, near Austin, Texas. Divers usually find it by floating or kayaking to the coordinates on the surface, dropping a marker, and then diving the site.

kanonfodr
March 3rd, 2010, 11:04 PM
I've been thinking of placing one or two here, especially after I heard about the ones in Lake Travis (my family lives near there). I've done some geocaching on land, and it's fun (and sometimes challenging). I just want to leave my mark underwater here in Hawaii as I am moving next year.

I wonder if SB would put up a forum for Underwater Geocaching. Would that be Technical Diving or merely advanced??

Peace,
Greg

Atom
March 3rd, 2010, 11:44 PM
Gotta say this is a really cool idea. And sounds like a fun way to practice navigation and gives a reason to go exploring dive sites for interesting spots where to hide the cache.

moneysavr
March 4th, 2010, 12:31 AM
we do caches in the areas we go diving like after the dives, I have seen them placed in the water in a jar on a string in the water under a pier,but how about a cache on a dive site were you just recorded a no# or a code? it would or could be a snorkel / dive/free dive?
I am going to place one off were I live attached to a rock in public waters off a park on Lake Michigan as a multi cache shore dive with a difficulty level, and start point GPS mark,distance to location with GPS#s,depth,distance from shore & a code no to log and email back for confirmation.and see if I get any hits! wow great way to meet other divers!

Doc Harry
March 4th, 2010, 01:13 AM
I've recently gotten into geocaching and have heard, but not seen, any underwater caches. What do people know? I'm assuming this is on the rise in the U.S. and worldwide. I'm excited about the prospect!

Anyone else have experience with UW geocaches?

Great.... Just what we need..... More garbage in the water......

No matter how you look at it, geocaching is littering. Is there not enough garbage around the world without intentionally adding even more trash?

Guba
March 4th, 2010, 11:13 AM
I suppose it could be considered as "trash", but the old saying has merit..."One person's trash is another's treasure".

Personally, I define trash as stuff that has no value and is, therefore, discarded. To me, the geocaches do, indeed, have a value. They invite divers to explore sites they might not otherwise visit, and to find them one must exercise some skills that many divers allow to go dormant...navigation, close observation, etc. By reporting the geocache's location and their visits, divers get the opportunity to meet and talk with other divers, thus building new networks and buddies. I see multiple benefits.

Another good thing is that the whereabouts of this "trash" is known. Therefore, it can be removed with ease if it has no functionality or has outlived its usefulness. Another good thing is that most of the underwater geocaches I know of are in freshwater lakes and quarries. Many of these locations tend to be rather "bland" on the bottom, unlike reefs and other marine environments. Therefore, a little bit of planted "trash" will have no impact upon any ecosystems or species while potentially serving up benefits.

Granted, haphazard dumping of stuff on the bottom and calling them geocaches would be a bad thing. However, with just a bit of thought, these attractions could provide entertainment and education for a lot of folks.

TyGuy
March 4th, 2010, 12:07 PM
this is a great idea seems like there is some serious interest in it. has anyone found any websites with approx. locations for underwater caches? if not, has anyone thought about starting said site?

i frequently dive a small cove in jamestown RI. i think it'd be a cool place for a cache. what would the setup be?

UntamedSpirit
March 4th, 2010, 11:17 PM
was going to try to place some in DE maybe around the China Wreck, and might try to get permission to place one at dutch springs.

Doc Harry
March 5th, 2010, 03:22 AM
I suppose it could be considered as "trash", but the old saying has merit..."One person's trash is another's treasure".

Yeah, trying to convice a geo-terrorist (geocacher) that "geocaching" is litter is like trying to convince a smoker that cigarette smoke is bad for everyone else around them.

So it all depends on the perpetrator's perspective? Following that logic, if I dump a bunch of garbage in your front yard and call it "geocaching," that's okay?

Deep-6
March 5th, 2010, 03:39 AM
Thats an interesting perspective Doc. Whats even more interesting is that this thread started six years ago and only has had 41 posts. I may be mistaken but in light of that and the fact I've never heard of "geocaching." I'm assuming its not that popular an activity with divers given our widespread ideals concerning the underwater enviornment.

Guba
March 5th, 2010, 09:55 AM
Let's put this in its proper perspective. I am not an active geocacher, but I know many who are and I have visited several of the caches and the national (and international) websites that log the data associated with them.

Geocaches are not items simply "dumped" in an area to attract attention. Rather, they are small, nondescript little "troves" of minute items (sometimes only a notebook to log the "finders") that can be taken or exchanged by the persons who find them. If you were to put a proper geocache on my front lawn, ideally I would not even notice it. Persons looking for the cache would need to follow a set of clues beyond the listed coordinates in order to locate the cache. Obviously, no one is advocating what you evidently envision this activity to be...the widespread scattering of debris and junk over wide areas of pristine environment. And, of course, no one is advocating the breaking of any laws (trespassing, un-authorized placement of materials in a National Marine Sanctuary or other government land, littering laws, or other rules). After all, dropping a 200 foot derelict ship on the bottom of the sea is, in essence, mega-geocaching, but that requires a LOT of permission-granting and regulations. The only real difference is that the shipwreck is in plain sight and much easier to find!

PhilC
March 5th, 2010, 10:21 AM
Yeah, trying to convice a geo-terrorist (geocacher) that "geocaching" is litter is like trying to convince a smoker that cigarette smoke is bad for everyone else around them.

So it all depends on the perpetrator's perspective? Following that logic, if I dump a bunch of garbage in your front yard and call it "geocaching," that's okay?

Wow, just wow. Talk about not having a clue. My wife and I have been moderately active geo-cachers for a couple of years now. Every time we head out to cache we take a trash bag with us and bring it back full. It's part of cacheing and something that a LOT of cachers do. "Cache in-trash out" If you had any clue whatsoever what the activity was about and what type of people actually participate in it you wouldn't sound like such a whack-job.

Doc Harry
March 5th, 2010, 05:25 PM
Wow, just wow. Talk about not having a clue. My wife and I have been moderately active geo-cachers for a couple of years now. Every time we head out to cache we take a trash bag with us and bring it back full. It's part of cacheing and something that a LOT of cachers do. "Cache in-trash out" If you had any clue whatsoever what the activity was about and what type of people actually participate in it you wouldn't sound like such a whack-job.

Okay. I've been orienteering and hiking in the backcountry for 40 years. Even before it was called orienteering or "geo-littering."

If I dump one bag of garbage in your front yard and pack out two bags, that's okay?

Parts is parts.

Litter is litter.

"Troves" are litter.

Bury your little treasures in your own yard, not on public property. And definitely leave the ocean out of your evil plans.

Guba
March 5th, 2010, 08:54 PM
If you've been plodding the backwoods for 40 years on a regular basis (and I suspect at least part of that is along the Appalachian Trail) then it's a near certainty that you've passed right by or over at least a few geocaches.

And you never even knew it.

And yes, I do have a geocache on my own private property. And responsible geocachers get permission before placing a cache anywhere.

FireInMyBones
March 5th, 2010, 10:17 PM
Anyone else have experience with UW geocaches?

I ran across one in 50ft of water at Lake Jocassee. I wondered what it was there for.

UntamedSpirit
March 5th, 2010, 11:19 PM
Okay. I've been orienteering and hiking in the backcountry for 40 years. Even before it was called orienteering or "geo-littering."

If I dump one bag of garbage in your front yard and pack out two bags, that's okay?

Parts is parts.

Litter is litter.

"Troves" are litter.

Bury your little treasures in your own yard, not on public property. And definitely leave the ocean out of your evil plans.

Litter is abandoned, geocaches are maintained, and removed if they seem to be causing harm to the environment, adding a small canister with wetnotes and minor trade items to a shipwreck would have little to no impact if done properly.

ScubaBones
March 8th, 2010, 10:03 AM
Bury your little treasures in your own yard, not on public property. And definitely leave the ocean out of your evil plans.

Geocaches aren't buried. It is against the rules, and policed by the community.

DiveNav
March 8th, 2010, 04:54 PM
I think I am going to add virtual geocaching to our scuba diving simulator ...
I like the idea of having a notebook hidden in our virtual dive sites and people that find it can write their name on it .... and move it around too.

Alberto (aka eDiver)

iztok
March 8th, 2010, 10:51 PM
Yeah, trying to convice a geo-terrorist (geocacher) that "geocaching" is litter is like trying to convince a smoker that cigarette smoke is bad for everyone else around them.

So it all depends on the perpetrator's perspective? Following that logic, if I dump a bunch of garbage in your front yard and call it "geocaching," that's okay?

Doc Harry, you seriously have no clue what you are talking about. Perhaps reading some geocaching.com and rules you might figure out that things are not how you perceive them.

You will find out there are rules that are designed to combat exactly the issues you are concerned with.

You are demonizing activity that is probably more popular than diving and responsible for more trash removal than diving and environmentally less taxing than diving.

iztok
March 8th, 2010, 10:54 PM
I think I am going to add virtual geocaching to our scuba diving simulator ...
I like the idea of having a notebook hidden in our virtual dive sites and people that find it can write their name on it .... and move it around too.

Alberto (aka eDiver)

DiveNav, I can probably get you a list of UW geocaches and their coordinates so you could place them close where they are supposed to be in the real life.

DiveNav
March 9th, 2010, 05:25 AM
DiveNav, I can probably get you a list of UW geocaches and their coordinates so you could place them close where they are supposed to be in the real life.

I like that :D

Also, it would be nice to have a description (images better) of the various geocaches.

So far we have dive sites in SoCal and Florida

Alberto (aka eDiver)

iztok
March 9th, 2010, 06:41 AM
I like that :D

Also, it would be nice to have a description (images better) of the various geocaches.

So far we have dive sites in SoCal and Florida

Alberto (aka eDiver)

Two bit overlapping lists:

Geocaching > Bookmark Lists > SCUBA caches (http://www.geocaching.com/bookmarks/view.aspx?guid=821648e5-a67a-4092-9adf-965e7785b236)

Geocaching > Bookmark Lists > SCUBA (http://www.geocaching.com/bookmarks/view.aspx?guid=e19f4cb5-18e5-4c59-ae63-4b8279c6d291)

Many have description.

I only had the opportunity to find one for now.

GCT98H Underwater SCUBA Cache at Breakwater in Monterey (Traditional Cache) in California, United States created by jmunch, fox51 (http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?guid=af941411-6123-401d-b759-9974b7996067)

Picture of it:

http://img.geocaching.com/cache/log/thumb/16861abf-e1f2-45e3-91ac-18ab76f30224.jpg

and pic of it opened:

http://img.geocaching.com/cache/log/thumb/0b857ca4-bdec-4aac-8c11-9ec280e44b1c.jpg

There are other images:

Geocaching > Hide and Seek a Geocache > Geocache Gallery (http://www.geocaching.com/seek/gallery.aspx?guid=af941411-6123-401d-b759-9974b7996067)

But I only took the first two mentioned here.

wilderydude83
March 9th, 2010, 04:42 PM
Hey! i'm a fellow geocacher as well. I think its legal to put one underwater and am acutally planning on putting one in key largo in about 20 feet of water, so someone can scuba or freedive it. let me know what you find out.

Randall

Hoomi
March 9th, 2010, 04:51 PM
I'm considering placing one in Himalaya Bay, Sonora, Mexico next time we go down there.

Land geocaching has led us to some awesome locations, where we've seen things we probably would never have found had we not been looking for the cache.

tjwheel
March 13th, 2010, 10:25 AM
We frequent Yellowstone Ntnl Park. It is unlawful to place a physical geocache within the park, so "virtual" caches are placed. These may be view points or unknown geysers or whatever a cacher finds interesting. Why not virtual scuba caches? An interesting rock formation, cave opening, bottomed boat? How would one sign the log under water?

Protist
March 13th, 2010, 10:49 AM
I dont know if its part of geocaching, but there is some stuff hidden down at Dutch Springs, PA

Guba
March 13th, 2010, 11:01 AM
"Virtual geocaches" could be sites that are visited and recorded using photos or videos that could be posted online. Visitors follow the coordinates, visit the site, whether it be on land or underwater, document their visit with images and upload the photos to a site (most geocache sites have galleries).

DiveNav
March 13th, 2010, 12:27 PM
..... How would one sign the log under water?
working on that.

SailNaked
May 12th, 2010, 11:05 AM
I can see docs point, any introduction of anything no matter how small and inconspicuous in the underwater environment is litter. So my solution is a virtual geocache.

my idea is to list a geocache as normal. however there will not be anything there you have to take a picture of the spot and post it to get logged, and I will mail you a coin. cant cost me more than a few dollars on postage. :D

After reading the geocache rules I think this may not be allowed. however I have another solution. All I have to do is find something existing in a location and use its name or some other bit of information about it to make a clue to a code that leads to a location with a log and a cache, like a hotel or something, I bet the hotel will be happy to support my cache as it has people visit.

If the rules allow you to mail a coin for a successful sighting then i will do that.

BarrelRoll
May 12th, 2010, 03:00 PM
How would one sign the log under water?


working on that.

I made the mistake of showing this thread to my wife and I've now been tasked with building a treasure chest that we can put in Clear Springs Scuba Park in Terrel, Texas.

She just ordered this to use as the log:

Rite in The Rain #635 DuraRite Underwater Waterproof Notebook 3" X 5" (http://www.leisurepro.com/Prod/RITN3.html?Search=op%3ddtSearch%26Term%3dnotebook% 26SearchFlag%3dall%26AdvSrchSortField%3dRelevance% 26DescSort%3d0%26Description%3don%26Hit%3d1)

Herk_Man
May 12th, 2010, 03:18 PM
I can see docs point, any introduction of anything no matter how small and inconspicuous in the underwater environment is litter. So my solution is a virtual geocache.

If I plant a rosebush in the middle of my yard, is it a weed? Most geocaches cannot even be seen by someone unless they are searching for it and have the instructions to find it. Litter. Pfft.

Doc Harry
May 12th, 2010, 03:31 PM
If I plant a rosebush in the middle of my yard, is it a weed? Most geocaches cannot even be seen by someone unless they are searching for it and have the instructions to find it. Litter. Pfft.

No... but it's YOUR YARD.

Don't be stashing your trash anywhere but YOUR YARD.

BarrelRoll
May 12th, 2010, 03:34 PM
No... but it's YOUR YARD.

Don't be stashing your trash anywhere but YOUR YARD.

Geocachers are very, very environmentally motivated. In fact, if you go to their site they advocate carrying a garbage bag and picking up litter while caching.

It's a very hippy, love nature sort of activity.

Guba
May 12th, 2010, 04:24 PM
Yeah, BR, but I'd still check with Robert (CSSP manager) before you stash a cache there.

After all, that is most certainly HIS yard.

BarrelRoll
May 12th, 2010, 04:45 PM
Oh definitely. Any place that won't even let you bring your dog when camping is definitely one where you need to make sure the bosses are cool with every little move you make.

Related question -- We're looking for some sort of treasure chest sort of deal to use as the cache. Any suggestions? The only ones I can find online that look like they'd work are like 2-3 feet, little too big for our purposes me thinks.

roturner
May 12th, 2010, 05:40 PM
Related question -- We're looking for some sort of treasure chest sort of deal to use as the cache. Any suggestions? The only ones I can find online that look like they'd work are like 2-3 feet, little too big for our purposes me thinks.

Around here people often use old ammo boxes. You could paint it to look like a teasure chest....

Just a thought.

I've been thinking about hiding one in a place where we go diving as part of a multi. All you'd need to do for the under water part is leave something that would allow the finder to either calculate the next coordinate or copy it.

One idea I had is to use characteristics of a wreck. Something like this kind of a clue: "find the depth at the hard bottom exactly 27 metres in the compass direction of 140 deg from the exact tip of the bow rounded to the nearest 3 meters" (so small variations due to tides or instrument readings don't screw it up) and then using that number, the next coordinate in the multi is N52.152.(XX-12) E004.243.(XX+36)

Something like that is doable without the need to stash a log book or whatever on the dive site. If the bottom contour was stable enough (and interesting enough to force them to dive it) that would work. I know a place where everyone knows that the wreck has an easy to find engine block in 15 metres of water but 50 meters further up to the SE, the hard bottom is at 25 meters and 50 meters further up to the WSW it's 8 meters deep..... hmmmm... :coffee:

R..

Hoomi
May 13th, 2010, 12:37 AM
Yeppers. Anything introduced to the bottom of the ocean is litter. (http://www.keywest.com/vandenberg/)

One thing that cachers strive for in hiding a cache is to make it as inconspicuous as possible, so that it doesn't get "muggled". Some non-cachers, if they find a cache, will remove it or vandalize it, and it's a real disappointment to spend time getting to the cache site, only to find the cache is gone. If the cacher has done his job well, the only people that will ever see the cache are those that are specifically looking for it.

Quite often, a cache is placed at a spot that has some special attraction. A scuba cache might be placed where there is a cool underwater arch, or maybe an especially interesting population of marine life, such as "Stingray Alley".

BarrelRoll
May 13th, 2010, 03:05 AM
Around here people often use old ammo boxes. You could paint it to look like a teasure chest....

Yeah, ammo boxes are par for the course here as well.

I guess it's hard to describe, but Clear Springs is sort of a SCUBA amusement park. There's sunken planes and boats, a giant propane tank thing that's been welded and cut to look like a shark for penetration training. Long story short, it's a rock quarry that allows nothing but SCUBA training. No fishing, boats, nothing but divers.

For that reason my wife (being the purist she is) wants to make an "attraction", a treasure chest which would dictate it's own nav point on the lake, possibly a hard to find navigation point for training.

vjanelle
May 13th, 2010, 12:23 PM
Besides clues from shore from a GPS point, how else would you go about setting up a scuba cache?

Compass bearings (you do have a compass and know how to use it, right?), combined with reference points to combat tidal exchanges, etc.

There are various memorial markers around some dive sites where people have died... And then there's things like:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3527/3914291400_c11094a92e_m.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/vincentjvancouver/3914291400/in/set-72157622414638654/)

Herk_Man
May 13th, 2010, 12:32 PM
Ok, so I plant a rose bush in the city park (out of the way so it doesn't inhibit other activities, blah blah blah). Is it a weed? Stop being a POV warrior and twisting the analogy to meet your idealisms.

They are putting some tasteful art that will eventually become home to coral and other sea life on the reefs in some dive locations around the world. Is this "litter?" No.

All I'm saying is that you can place a geocache in the ocean in a way that is inconspicuous, doesn't hamper marine life, and doesn't spoil the dive experience. It's not like you're going to have a bunch of them all in the same place.

And no, I don't geocache.

Jaysum025
April 11th, 2011, 04:22 AM
Geocaching rules! I can't wait to find my first UWC!!!

Lefty Writer
April 25th, 2011, 01:53 PM
Two bit overlapping lists:

Geocaching > Bookmark Lists > SCUBA caches (http://www.geocaching.com/bookmarks/view.aspx?guid=821648e5-a67a-4092-9adf-965e7785b236)

Geocaching > Bookmark Lists > SCUBA (http://www.geocaching.com/bookmarks/view.aspx?guid=e19f4cb5-18e5-4c59-ae63-4b8279c6d291)

Many have description.

I only had the opportunity to find one for now.

GCT98H Underwater SCUBA Cache at Breakwater in Monterey (Traditional Cache) in California, United States created by jmunch, fox51 (http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?guid=af941411-6123-401d-b759-9974b7996067)

Picture of it:

http://img.geocaching.com/cache/log/thumb/16861abf-e1f2-45e3-91ac-18ab76f30224.jpg

and pic of it opened:

http://img.geocaching.com/cache/log/thumb/0b857ca4-bdec-4aac-8c11-9ec280e44b1c.jpg

There are other images:

Geocaching > Hide and Seek a Geocache > Geocache Gallery (http://www.geocaching.com/seek/gallery.aspx?guid=af941411-6123-401d-b759-9974b7996067)

But I only took the first two mentioned here.

Cool!
My wife and I will start our OW class in two weeks, and being the avid cachers we are (we use the same username "Lefty Writer"), so naturally I'm thinking long term here and looking for potential scuba caches close to home. The bookmark list you provided has shown a few caches near where some family lives in SAT.

Thanks for the links!

wilderydude83
April 25th, 2011, 03:45 PM
I started a thread a while back about this but forgot to actually do it. I don't know of any personally but I've heard there are a few out there. My idea was to take a brick and some rope anc onnect that to a hook. Then connect a pelican case to that hook. The geocacher would snorkel or scuba down and unhook the pelican case. It could def. work. I still might do it.

I already have a location in mind and its in key largo at the end of a canal.

Angela Marie Micinski
April 26th, 2011, 09:34 AM
Make sure you have your scuba equipment but there is one near Marietta landing by Lake Murray in Oklahoma.

Doc Harry
April 26th, 2011, 06:19 PM
Thanks for all of the great info. Now I know where to start picking up the garbage and placing it in the dumpster.

JPScubaTreasureHunts
May 2nd, 2011, 04:31 PM
Thanks for all of the great info. Now I know where to start picking up the garbage and placing it in the dumpster.



I think the same thing but if they keep it clean I dont see any problems with it.

iztok
May 9th, 2011, 02:17 AM
Thanks for all of the great info. Now I know where to start picking up the garbage and placing it in the dumpster.

You really think geocaches are the problem? They are placed and maintained with care where they don't present danger for marine life or the divers.

These are not abandoned items and present less harm to the environment than wrecks off coast of NC.

Doc Harry
May 11th, 2011, 07:56 AM
You really think geocaches are the problem? They are placed and maintained with care where they don't present danger for marine life or the divers.

Oh, okay, let me dump a pile of garbage in your front yard. It won't present a danger to you or your family. I'll call it "geocaching" and everything will be fine.

iztok
May 14th, 2011, 08:33 AM
Oh, okay, let me dump a pile of garbage in your front yard. It won't present a danger to you or your family. I'll call it "geocaching" and everything will be fine.

1. This is not a pile of garbage.
2. It is not in your front yard.

There are clear guidelines on placements and disruptions. You probably pass several caches on a daily basis and don't even know they are there. Geocaching creates more clean environment than it does pollution. Many parks and other public places are cleaned on a regular basis by geocachers.

Basically you are flaming people who more than likely take out more trash than you do.

Doc Harry
May 15th, 2011, 12:37 PM
1. This is not a pile of garbage.

Ha! Says who? You? Any crap that you dump in the ocean is garbage. Period. Justify it all you want, it doesn't change anything. It's still garbage. leave your garbage out of the ocean.

JPScubaTreasureHunts
May 19th, 2011, 11:19 AM
1. This is not a pile of garbage.
2. It is not in your front yard.

There are clear guidelines on placements and disruptions. You probably pass several caches on a daily basis and don't even know they are there. Geocaching creates more clean environment than it does pollution. Many parks and other public places are cleaned on a regular basis by geocachers.

Basically you are flaming people who more than likely take out more trash than you do.


thank you and when i dive to hide things i always take my bag so i can pic up trash like bottles and other things that are down there.

on_two_wheels
May 25th, 2011, 05:53 PM
I think the idea of geocaching underwater is absurd. Most are going to leave plastic containers. Maybe not much of an issue in a lake but in the ocean, mother nature has a way of moving things even when you think they're well secured. When that happens, you've just contributed to the massive quantities of plastic already in the ocean. Is diving so boring that you need to play a game while doing it? Just go get an underwater metal detector instead. Or search for waste/garbage and do some clean up.

Doc Harry
May 25th, 2011, 07:33 PM
I think the idea of geocaching underwater is absurd. Most are going to leave plastic containers. Maybe not much of an issue in a lake but in the ocean, mother nature has a way of moving things even when you think they're well secured. When that happens, you've just contributed to the massive quantities of plastic already in the ocean. Is diving so boring that you need to play a game while doing it? Just go get an underwater metal detector instead. Or search for waste/garbage and do some clean up.

Very well said. Thank you.

VinoBambinos
May 31st, 2011, 05:53 PM
DAN has an interesting article in AlertDiverOnline about Scubacaching, we have a group that is planning a trip to the Florida Keys and there is one hidden there (Key Largo) called 5 Fathom Cache.
Anyone that says "Any crap that you dump in the ocean is garbage" must not be an advocate for artifical reefs nor a fan of wreck diving...both of which I enjoy along with Geocaching.

davetowz
May 31st, 2011, 10:31 PM
There is a scuba geocache in Lake Millbrook VA.

ScubaEMT
June 1st, 2011, 10:18 PM
1. This is not a pile of garbage.
2. It is not in your front yard.

There are clear guidelines on placements and disruptions. You probably pass several caches on a daily basis and don't even know they are there. Geocaching creates more clean environment than it does pollution. Many parks and other public places are cleaned on a regular basis by geocachers.

Basically you are flaming people who more than likely take out more trash than you do.

Just ignore him. He clearly does not understand what a geocache is despite multiple attempts to inform him.

ScubaEMT
June 1st, 2011, 10:21 PM
Oh, okay, let me dump a pile of garbage in your front yard. It won't present a danger to you or your family. I'll call it "geocaching" and everything will be fine.

Oh, okay, let me dump an old rundown (or wrecked) boat in your front yard. It won't present a danger to you or your family. I'll call it wreck diving and everything will be fine. Oh, wait a second...

cgoode
August 23rd, 2011, 01:57 AM
There is a geocache in Lake Chelan, Eastern Washington. It is in 110 feet of water (Cold water, drysuit recommended) where a car drove off a cliffside, someone put the cache there. Looks fun I will be checking it out soon. I googled scuba diving lake chelan and found it... You would probably be better off searching lake chelan SCUBA geocache... Good luck, leave me something cool to find. I know just what to leave already...

SoFlo_Diver
August 25th, 2012, 09:45 PM
Interesting thread. For those of you interested in this, I am creating a series of geocaches called "Wreck-amended" I'm placing caches on several wrecks on Broward Count and Miami-Dade county in Florida. Keep your eyes peeled


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