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Lawman
January 21st, 2005, 04:50 PM
Here in Central Michigan we don't have a decompression chamber. Our dive club would like to build our own. We have a 2000 gal fiberglass septic tank and an 8 hp aircompresser. We thought with a few fittings and a larger hatch we could adapt our tank and save a ton of $$$$. Does anyone have any ideas that might help?

roakey
January 21st, 2005, 04:59 PM
Does anyone know where the link is to the homemade decompression chamber that blew up that killed someone?

String
January 21st, 2005, 05:02 PM
Try here:

http://www.suntimes.co.za/2004/02/01/news/gauteng/njhb01.asp

Id assumed the initial post mentioning fibreglass septic tanks was a troll or a joke. I HOPE it is !

jbd
January 21st, 2005, 05:04 PM
Does anyone know where the link is to the homemade decompression chamber that blew up that killed someone?
I remember that thread, but IIRC the explosion was linked to the use of 100% O2.

jbd
January 21st, 2005, 05:09 PM
Try here:

http://www.suntimes.co.za/2004/02/01/news/gauteng/njhb01.asp

Id assumed the initial post mentioning fibreglass septic tanks was a troll or a joke. I HOPE it is !

I took the post as being serious. Conceptually a deco chamber is quite a simple appartaus. The only thing I wonder is how long will it take them to pressurized a tank that size with the compressor they have? Curious also if they intend on using O2?

Gary D.
January 21st, 2005, 05:09 PM
Check the NASA web site. They are always looking for more efficient ways to get items into orbit.

Go buy a used one. They're affordable.

Gary D.

miketsp
January 21st, 2005, 05:20 PM
This thread had the discussion and the links.
http://www.scubaboard.com/t62122-.html

Coincidence or not, the questioner stopped posting 1 month later???

simbrooks
January 21st, 2005, 05:27 PM
Go buy a used one. They're affordable.
There was one on ebay recently, although i cant find the thread, but i know there was one on here! ;)

fdog
January 21st, 2005, 06:01 PM
It would be cheaper to buy used, than build from scratch and meet the ASME pressure vessel (for human use) specs, have the redundant gas supplies, paint off-gas requirements, keep OSHA happy...windows...

Not to mention installing a medical director (M.D.) and a training program so you can actually use the thing. Since putting someone in is "medical treatment" under order of a physician.

IIRC, test pressure has to be around 2.5 times working pressure. To run a Table 2A that'd be 185 psig. So the septic tank would have to pass this (questionable), and I'm not sure fiberglass is even a permisable material under ASME.

All the best, James

PS Besides there's just something wrong about it...."Here ya go, we'll fix you up in this sh*! tank"

rmediver2002
January 21st, 2005, 06:58 PM
Here in Central Michigan we don't have a decompression chamber. Our dive club would like to build our own. We have a 2000 gal fiberglass septic tank and an 8 hp aircompresser. We thought with a few fittings and a larger hatch we could adapt our tank and save a ton of $$$$. Does anyone have any ideas that might help?


Are you planning on using this chamber for treatment or some type of familiarization dives?

It is doubtful the tank will have enough integrity to hold the pressure required for treatments (around 100 psi for TT-6A) and 26.7 psi for standard treatment tables (TT-5 and TT-6)

Your compressor (8 HP) is more than likely only going to provide between 6 and 8 cubic feet a minute so your decent time is going to be very slow and the compressor is going to be running at 100% duty cylcle so the air is going to be extremely hot (this temperature is going to be a big issue with your compressor especially if it is oil free / teflon rings)

Once the chamber is at depth your flow from the compressor is not going to be enough to allow venting of the chamber, this is going to cause a build up of CO2 from the exhaled air from the divers inside. Another more serious issue would be a build up of O2 if you are having the patients breath O2 during the treatment.

If you do decide you want to try and see if the vessel will hold pressure, first fill it with water. You can increase the internal pressure slowly using a pressure washer, having the container filled with water will greatly decrease the amount of energy released in the event of a rupture but you really need to be careful...

Before considering putting any human being inside of any pressure vessel make sure you consider all of the possible hazards (rapid depressurization, O2 toxicity, CO2 toxicity, decompression sickness, hyperthermia, dehydration, waste elimination, etc...) you also need to consider the legal ramifications of any such endevor...

The advice above about begining a collection for a refurbished chamber or looking into government surplus is the best advice so far. Even new your only looking at between 25,000 and 35,000 for a decently equiped double lock chamber.

Brandon
January 21st, 2005, 07:09 PM
I imagine you might have some success with this...

Until the accident.

Then I wouldn't want to be in your shoes.

This just doesn't seem to be the kind of thing to homebrew... safety/liability issues all around that may be very difficult to work around.

-B.

roakey
January 21st, 2005, 08:37 PM
I took the post as being serious.
With over 700 posts by the person establishing the thread, I took the post as being serious too. So, given that we're discussing a fiberglass septic tank, I felt my response was appropriate.

Roak

Brandon
January 21st, 2005, 09:18 PM
Well... the other problem is that a septic tank isn't a pressure vessel.

I couldn't google a PSI rating for a fiberglass septic tank, but I imagine it isn't much, if it's even computed.... I found some info about the water holding tanks, which are very similar in terms of construction, and the tested pressure was very low, far below what you'd need for a deco chamber.

Think about the application these systems are used for: residential or small commercial water/septic holding tanks. The contents are rarely under much pressure... maybe just a little bit more then your tap water is... max.

All the deco chamber pictures I've seen look like the chamber is made out of steel... and fairly thick steel at that (judging from the viewing portals). Just compare the weights... a normal deco chamber weighs in somewhere around 5500 - 6500 pounds... that 2,000 gallon fiberglass septic tank weighs about 550 pounds. That'd make the wall thickness of your septic tank what.. 1/2" thick? Doubtful you're going to hold much pressure with that, considering the real chambers are made out of several inches of steel...

There's no way... I'd say they're similar in cylinder size only.

Maybe I'm way off... there's plenty of more experienced folks on this board who are better versed in these matters... but this is what common sense and a little bit of reason is telling me.

-B

simbrooks
January 21st, 2005, 09:29 PM
Well... the other problem is that a septic tank isn't a pressure vessel.
Lets just say that septic tanks are for use with hydrostatic pressure upto only 15-20 deep, really not meant for pressure.

fdog
January 21st, 2005, 09:33 PM
Lawman, just like Roakey, I assumed you were serious by your history.

So, here's were the start: $165 to buy the "bible of chamber construction" (http://members.asme.org/catalog/ItemView.cfm?IMAGE.X=16\&IMAGE.Y=11&ItemNumber=A09202) .

Best of luck!

All the best, James

rmediver2002
January 21st, 2005, 10:29 PM
just some more information for those interested:

Recompressions chambers are low pressure vessels, but since they are used for human occupancy they are signifigantly over engineered for safety.

Chambers are built from steel, aluminium (most common), lexan, and more recently synthetic cloth.

Most systems are designed to operate to 165 FSW (73.425 psi) or 60 FSW (26.7 psi)

This is an example of a portable system we used in the military, it is quite expensive since it was designed to military specification not produced for sale.


http://www.hqmc.usmc.mil/factfile.nsf/7e931335d515626a8525628100676e0c/b6bb2f0c31edc4f28525628a004fba06?OpenDocument

This is am example of a cloth / transport chamber, the US Navy has also purchased several of these and already successfully used it to transport a sick fisherman / diver in Hawaii

http://www.nautilussystems.com/chambers/chamber-frame.htm

This shows a typical 220 cubic foot double lock chamber, the most commonly used military and commercial diving chamber. For military and commercial operations the chamber is used as a tool to facilitate surface decompression as well as a device for treating diving injuries.

http://www.ambergriscaye.com/pages/town/hyperbar.html

Here is one of the most extensive types of systems you will find, a saturation diving system. These systems include pressurized bells for transporting the divers under pressure to and from the work site as well as pressurized living quarters.

http://www.nut.no/html/saturation_diving_systems.html

Here is a photo of the ocean test facility at the Navy Experiemental Diving Unit, a floodable chamber allowing equipment to be tested in a controlled environment at simulated water depths at a variety of temperature extremes.

http://www.supsalv.org/nedu/images/Photos/Osf10.jpg

DA Aquamaster
January 22nd, 2005, 12:31 AM
Your compressor (8 HP) is more than likely only going to provide between 6 and 8 cubic feet a minute so your decent time is going to be very slow and the compressor is going to be running at 100% duty cylcle so the air is going to be extremely hot (this temperature is going to be a big issue with your compressor especially if it is oil free / teflon rings)

Once the chamber is at depth your flow from the compressor is not going to be enough to allow venting of the chamber, this is going to cause a build up of CO2 from the exhaled air from the divers inside. Another more serious issue would be a build up of O2 if you are having the patients breath O2 during the treatment.Even with only an 8 cu ft per minute compressor, you could still use an airbank to provide the air required to blow the chamber down to the required depth and to ventilate the chamber as needed. With a big enough air bank and enough time between cycles, you could do it with 3.5 cfm compressor.

The pressure vessel itself is the big issue. The 75 psi needed to reach 165 ft. is no big deal with a small pressure vessel, but the stresses involved could pose a real challenge for a 2000 gallon septic tank. The effects of rapid decompression (ie. a near instaneous ascent from 165 ft) if it failed would be a real killer even if it did not explode.

diversteve
January 22nd, 2005, 12:51 AM
Here's one for sale, I think he's a surplus dealer so you might get a better price:

http://forums.deeperblue.net/showthread.php?t=57170

Robert Phillips
January 22nd, 2005, 01:13 AM
Come on guys, Lawman is the Troll King, but you all took the bait!

Rick Inman
January 22nd, 2005, 01:21 AM
Hey, I got a good name for your new chamber:

Darwin Hall! :D

Gary D.
January 22nd, 2005, 01:56 AM
Hey, I got a good name for your new chamber:

Darwin Hall! :D
Remember what Ralph used to say to Alice?

Gary D.

rmediver2002
January 22nd, 2005, 08:22 AM
Even with only an 8 cu ft per minute compressor, you could still use an airbank to provide the air required to blow the chamber down to the required depth and to ventilate the chamber as needed. With a big enough air bank and enough time between cycles, you could do it with 3.5 cfm compressor.

The pressure vessel itself is the big issue. The 75 psi needed to reach 165 ft. is no big deal with a small pressure vessel, but the stresses involved could pose a real challenge for a 2000 gallon septic tank. The effects of rapid decompression (ie. a near instaneous ascent from 165 ft) if it failed would be a real killer even if it did not explode.


Generally compressors listed by HP rating not cubic foot a minute are low pressure / shop air compressors. (the original post mentions a 8 HP compressor)

You are correct in that with an extremely large reserve of high pressure air in storage you could run a treatment.

Generally low pressure compressors used for recompressions chamber operations are a minimum of 40 cubic foot a minute usually run in series to provide adequate flow, even with 40 to 80 cubic feet a minute you are limited on the amount of ventilation that can be accomplished without losing chamber pressure.

Without the addition of an overboard dump system for the O2 the chamber is going to require a near continuous vent cycle to prevent the pp O2 from reaching dangerous levels.

cancun mark
January 22nd, 2005, 11:02 AM
:lol:

Lawman
January 24th, 2005, 02:54 PM
I suppose I should have mentioned our septic tank is a used one. We cleaned it out at the car wash and it should be serviceable. Our biggest concern is the hatch. A septic tank top is only 9" in diameter. We need a bigger hatch and a window of some type so the occupant can see out. Any ideas? It was suggested we use 1/4" plexiglass and fasten it with screws and aquarium sealer. What do you think?

Also, should we charge for using the chamber?

simbrooks
January 24th, 2005, 03:02 PM
I suppose I should have mentioned our septic tank is a used one. We cleaned it out at the car wash and it should be serviceable. Our biggest concern is the hatch. A septic tank top is only 9" in diameter. We need a bigger hatch and a window of some type so the occupant can see out. Any ideas? It was suggested we use 1/4" plexiglass and fasten it with screws and aquarium sealer. What do you think?

Also, should we charge for using the chamber?
If you find any cracks in the tank, seal them up with car body filler. 9-inches for a hatch is ok, you can get out of them if you breathe out a bit! Maybe the hatch should be made of really thick steel just in case it has to survive any kind of rupturing that might occur with the fibreglass? For the windows you want something flexible, i would suggest clingwrap/clingfilm, you can see through it and its easily replaceable with a trip to the grocery store. I think you should charge top dollar for your treatments, i mean look at the 10k+ treatments we hear about, you deserve your cut of that kind of money with all the effort you are putting into this! Think you could actually transport this chamber around on the back of a flatbed truck with no hassles, charge extra for that convenience or maybe instead of medievacing the patient, you could just have a remote controlled helicopter deliver the chamber to the site/patient thus avoid a two way trip from helicopter out to the site and then back into the hospital, you just fly one way to get it to the patient/victim. I think you could really make a go of this ;)

miketsp
January 24th, 2005, 03:51 PM
..snip..
We need a bigger hatch and a window of some type so the occupant can see out. Any ideas? It was suggested we use 1/4" plexiglass and fasten it with screws and aquarium sealer. What do you think?


I thought the main purpose of a window in a chamber is so that the attendant can see what is happening to the patient?

Who cares if the occupant can see out or not?

Just paint the inside blue as that is supposed to be a good color for bedrooms.
Blues that veer towards aqua are supposed to be soothing..

simbrooks
January 24th, 2005, 04:23 PM
I thought the main purpose of a window in a chamber is so that the attendant can see what is happening to the patient?

Who cares if the occupant can see out or not?
Well it would give you something to look at whilst you were in there, seeing the day passing. ;)

Just paint the inside blue as that is supposed to be a good color for bedrooms. Blues that veer towards aqua are supposed to be soothing..
Put fish like murals on the walls to make them feel like they are still UW as well! ;)

mempilot
January 24th, 2005, 04:26 PM
Wow, another Seinfeld thread!? :)

pipedope
January 24th, 2005, 04:27 PM
As this is clearly a joke to anyone who has anything more than a passing aquaintence with chambers I have moved it to humor so everyone else will also know that this is a joke.

Building a chamber without knowing what you are doing is a fast way to get killed and get someone else killed with you.

Unless you are a real boilermaker or certified in welding pressure vessels then do not even think of building one yourself.

Even if you buy a complete chamber system you also need to budget time and money for training your operators. It doesn't take much of a screw up to kill people even in a proper chamber.

simbrooks
January 24th, 2005, 04:56 PM
As this is clearly a joke to anyone who has anything more than a passing aquaintence with chambers I have moved it to humor so everyone else will also know that this is a joke.
Spoilsport moving it around! ;)

macgyver2258
January 24th, 2005, 09:41 PM
Lawman,
I know a guy, who knows guy, who stole one here in Grand Rapids. :D
There is really like 4 or 5 chambers in Michigan if you really need to use one. Besides where in central Michigan do you need to attempt this dive so you try out your chamber?

Also, if you do charge for this chamber, will you also provide liability insurance. I would hate to pay for something only to get hurt and my health insurance won't cover it because I'm ignorant

I hope this is a joke

mike_s
January 25th, 2005, 12:34 AM
As we can all see that this is as full of **** as his septic tank is, I thought I'd ad this.

In the November issue of Powet & Motoryacht Magazine, they
did a story on Tiger Woods new Yacht and also a part of the
scuba gear on board.

They said he has a "inflatable decompression chamber aboard"

Never heard of an inflatable decompression chamber. Anyone else?

oh... See the article at http://www.powerandmotoryacht.com/megayachts/1104christensen155/index1.html

Scuba stuff in about the 5th 6th, 7th paragraphs.

simbrooks
January 25th, 2005, 01:36 AM
In the November issue of Powet & Motoryacht Magazine, they
did a story on Tiger Woods new Yacht and also a part of the
scuba gear on board.

They said he has a "inflatable decompression chamber aboard"

Never heard of an inflatable decompression chamber. Anyone else?

oh... See the article at http://www.powerandmotoryacht.com/megayachts/1104christensen155/index1.html

Scuba stuff in about the 5th 6th, 7th paragraphs.

I was impressed until I looked all the way aft on the top deck to starboard. There, I saw six large helium tanks—a clue to the coolest sports equipment aboard.

Helium, when combined with oxygen and nitrogen, creates what is known in the scuba world as trimix—a breathable blend that lets you dive deeper than traditional tanks full of compressed air. Helium cannot be manufactured, hence the six tanks of it on Hull 026’s top deck. They are positioned to be lowered by crane to the lazarette, then used to fill divers’ tanks at a “gas blend” table there. The entire setup cost at least $150,000, according to the project engineer who’d flown out to the Pacific Northwest from Fort Lauderdale to oversee installation. He says his company, Brownie’s Third Lung, also installed the scuba system aboard the world’s second largest private motoryacht, the 414-foot Octopus, for owner Paul Allen last year. “This is probably the next biggest one that I’ve seen,” he says. “They had 16 helium bottles and a decompression chamber (aboard Octopus).”

Hull 026 will have an inflatable decompression chamber aboard, an important safety measure for divers who push deeper than the 120-foot recreational limit. One of the deckhands aboard says his boss has never been below 140 feet but is now aiming for 200. “Anywhere there’s fish,” he says. “We like to spear fish.”
Does sound kind of weird, that is one pricey mix station as well! I guess Tiger wants to go deeper - although i would think his insurance company might have something to tell him about his premium.

rmediver2002
January 25th, 2005, 08:43 AM
This is am example of a cloth / transport chamber, the US Navy has also purchased several of these and already successfully used it to transport a sick fisherman / diver in Hawaii

http://www.nautilussystems.com/cham...amber-frame.htm

cancun mark
January 25th, 2005, 10:10 AM
I have heard of inflatable chambers, they are used extensively in high altitude for treatment of altitude sickness, they have a rating of about three to four atmospheres and fold up into a duffel bag that can fit in the trunk of a car (or on the back of a Yak)

I dont know how well thy would work for a serious case of the bends, but they may be rather effective in treatment of mild cases. I even saw a website for them once. They are made out of inflatable boat type material.

TwoTanks
January 25th, 2005, 11:14 AM
I have heard of inflatable chambers, they are used extensively in high altitude for treatment of altitude sickness, they have a rating of about three to four atmospheres and fold up into a duffel bag that can fit in the trunk of a car (or on the back of a Yak)

I dont know how well thy would work for a serious case of the bends, but they may be rather effective in treatment of mild cases. I even saw a website for them once. They are made out of inflatable boat type material.
Anybody know how much a yak costs?
or where to get one?
How many yaks does it take to haul a compressor?
where do you get yak food?

Seriously,
Was this originally posted under scuba humor or was someone really trying to build a homemade decompression chamber?

If you don't really understand the forces involved, it might seem somewhat easy to do.

Please don't try this at home.

TT

RDP
January 25th, 2005, 11:24 AM
Does anyone have any ideas that might help?

Make sure your life insurance is paid up. ;)

Brandon
January 25th, 2005, 12:09 PM
Make sure your life insurance is paid up. ;)

And that it doesn't include a stupidity clause...

Lawman
January 25th, 2005, 02:13 PM
We hope to have our chamber up and running by June. We received a contribution from a local tire store of some truck innertube valves. We plan on fitting them to the
tank so we can pressurize the chamber by using a simple tire inflator. Simplicity should help keep costs down.

I think some of you arn't taking the project as seriously as I'd hoped. Still, your suggestions may be useful. We probably won't have that many emergencies since the deepest lake in our area is only 18' deep. We're hoping to get medivac flights from the Great Lakes once word gets around. Those of you with the cheaper DAN insurance might remember we're here.

Local dentists offices have contributed used National Geographics and last years Better Homes Magazines for use in the chamber during those long decon hours.
This is really a community effort.

simbrooks
January 25th, 2005, 02:15 PM
This is really a community effort.
It takes a village.... ;)

cancun mark
January 25th, 2005, 02:25 PM
Anybody know how much a yak costs?
or where to get one?
How many yaks does it take to haul a compressor?
where do you get yak food?
TT

Yaks are very expensive and not ideally suited to compressor hauling. I would reccommend camels as they have a factory installed gas supply..

You can also pick up about three or four camels in exchange for a slightly used swedish ex girlfriend.

FatCat
January 25th, 2005, 05:58 PM
You can also pick up about three or four camels in exchange for a slightly used swedish ex girlfriend.

Wow! My wife's extremely flattered now. I got offered ten thousand camels for her on our last trip to Egypt.

My wife costs less to feed than the camels though... (off stage muffled sound: "Honey, stop hitting me with that twin fifteen liter. It was only a joooooooo... ouch!)

Brandon
January 25th, 2005, 06:29 PM
Bah! So it was all a joke! Well... let me get some input on this deco chamber in as well!

As far as strength goes... you could wrap the septic tank in duct tape several times. Just pick up a case of it at Costco, and whammo... instant structural strength improvement! Maybe you could also truss the tank up with some butcher's twine too...

I'm thinking that you might be able to line the Yak's pen with some of those little foot powered air pumps. When he walks around in it... he'll be helping pressurize the chamber! That should take care of the air compressor problem...

Heck, while you're at the tire store picking up the valves, maybe they have a couple air compressors lying around that you could pick up cheap! Just add in a couple pints of oil (synthetic is a marketing scam anyway), and you should be all set!

And just to make sure that everything is hunky dory inside the chamber... remember to add the canary cage.

-B.

miketsp
January 25th, 2005, 06:51 PM
..snip..
They said he has a "inflatable decompression chamber aboard"

Never heard of an inflatable decompression chamber. Anyone else?
..snip..


I thought they only used them in space:

Voskhod (1964 to 1965)
The spherical Voskhod capsule was basically an improved version of the Vostok, with a rearranged interior to accommodate three cosmonauts. To help make room for the cosmonauts, Voskhod became the first spacecraft in which the crew did not wear space suits. Objectives of the Voskhod program were to gather data on group crews and study human behavior outside the capsule.(3) Voskhod 2 was equipped with one space suit and an inflatable decompression chamber from which the first space walk was performed. There were two manned Voskhod missions.

from
http://flightprojects.msfc.nasa.gov/book/chap5.html

pipedope
January 26th, 2005, 01:43 AM
I think Jeff's link go broken. Try this one;
http://www.nautilussystems.com/chambers/chamber-frame.htm

There are a couple of companies making inflatable chambers. They are usually used in situations where a chamber is needed but space is limited.

Some of them are limited in the pressure they can hold and others are certified to 165FSW so they can do most of the Navy treatment tables.

Cost is similar to hard chambers but they are much easier to transport.

Lawman
January 27th, 2005, 12:09 PM
Come on guys, Lawman is the Troll King, but you all took the bait!


Heh, heh, heh,,,,,

pennypue
January 27th, 2005, 12:53 PM
Ok, let's review the troll "clues".
1)His board name is Lawman, mmmmm, perhaps a hint as to his profession?? His sig line is "I'm trusting in the Lord and a good lawyer"
Ollie North, 1986......a coincidence?

2)This board is loaded with engineers and computer geeks (appellation lovingly applied)

Now, group one likes to instigate things. Group two likes to build things. It was like teasing a dog on a rope with raw hamburger, easy and fun. :D Gullible, gullible, gullible.

Shame on you Lawman!!!

Do it again! Do it again! :jump:

Brandon
January 27th, 2005, 01:15 PM
Stop it Lawman! Stop tapping on the glass!

Owwww my head!

-B

H2Andy
January 27th, 2005, 01:17 PM
Bah! So it was all a joke!


well... it was posted on the Scuba Humor section :wink:


and a fiberglass sceptic tank?? brilliant

simbrooks
January 27th, 2005, 01:21 PM
well... it was posted on the Scuba Humor section :wink:
Check the thread history Andy - it was in the basic scuba discussions, Pipedope put it over here after most had put in their bit on the joke, or took it seriously. Its still amusing, but of course not all lawyers have a sense of humour ;)

H2Andy
January 27th, 2005, 01:29 PM
Check the thread history Andy - it was in the basic scuba discussions

now, THAT is low-down treachery!

Brandon
January 27th, 2005, 01:33 PM
I feel violated.

-B

pipedope
January 27th, 2005, 01:45 PM
Its still amusing, but of course not all lawyers have a sense of humour ;)

I must disagree.
I believe that all lawyers have a sense of humor.
It is something else that many of them lack. :eyebrow:

Maybe some of them need a recompression treatment in a used septic tank. :D

Gee, I guess this thread did become usefull after all. :11:

H2Andy
January 27th, 2005, 02:26 PM
I believe that all lawyers have a sense of humor.
It is something else that many of them lack. :eyebrow:


human DNA?

oh wait, no... that's computer services support staff types :eyebrow:

(the above is a joke and it may or may not reflect the beliefs of the
poster, his family, certain of his household pets (but not others)
and the Ed White High School Class of 1985 (Go Commanders!!))

pipedope
January 27th, 2005, 04:13 PM
I would say that commercial divers are not quite human. It is not a requirement for the job but it helps. :eyebrow:

There are computer support people and then there are AOL and similar support staff who seem to have a total of 10 brain cells between the entire staff.
:sick:
My cats seem to think lawyers are great.
Then again, they are carnivorous killers who like to play with their victums before killing them. ;)

I better go, it is time for a dive in the tank. :sick:

Lawman
January 28th, 2005, 02:42 PM
Ok, let's review the troll "clues".
1)His board name is Lawman, mmmmm, perhaps a hint as to his profession?? His sig line is "I'm trusting in the Lord and a good lawyer"
Ollie North, 1986......a coincidence?

2)This board is loaded with engineers and computer geeks (appellation lovingly applied)

Now, group one likes to instigate things. Group two likes to build things. It was like teasing a dog on a rope with raw hamburger, easy and fun. :D Gullible, gullible, gullible.

Shame on you Lawman!!!

Do it again! Do it again! :jump:

Clue #1- It was a used septic tank
Clue #2- It had a 9" hatch
Clue #3- It was pressurized using truck tire valves
Clue #4- It was pressurized with an 8hp compressor
Clue #5- It was to have a 1/4" plexiglass window held with screws and aquarium sealer
Which one of them tipped you off Inspector Clouseau?

pennypue
January 28th, 2005, 04:28 PM
Clue #1- It was a used septic tank
Clue #2- It had a 9" hatch
Clue #3- It was pressurized using truck tire valves
Clue #4- It was pressurized with an 8hp compressor
Clue #5- It was to have a 1/4" plexiglass window held with screws and aquarium sealer
Which one of them tipped you off Inspector Clouseau?
I believe it was "none of the above".
Your quote was a dead giveaway, contained an oxymoron====="good lawyer".

:laughing: <=====this would be the hint that I'm just kidding, kind of........;)

H2Andy
January 28th, 2005, 04:31 PM
Your quote was a dead giveaway, contained an oxymoron====="good lawyer".


why.... i outta...


"I'm being executed at dawn. I was to be executed at midnight, but
I have a smart lawyer."

Woody Allen

simbrooks
January 28th, 2005, 04:34 PM
why.... i outta...


"I'm being executed at dawn. I was to be executed at midnight, but
I have a smart lawyer."

Woody Allen
I know its a quote, but of course you have a better chance of not being shot (assuming firing squad) at night as they cant see, unless you are on the east side of the squad at dawn - or they slept in. ;)

Foo
January 31st, 2005, 02:58 AM
I know its a quote, but of course you have a better chance of not being shot (assuming firing squad) at night as they cant see, unless you are on the east side of the squad at dawn - or they slept in. ;)

Keep on marching to that different drummer, Simon.

It's what I like about you.

Foo

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