Welcome to ScubaBoard, an online scuba diving forum community where you can join over 205,000 divers diving from around the world. If the topic is related to scuba diving, this is the place to find divers talking about it. To gain full access to ScubaBoard (and make this large box go away) you must register for a free account. As a registered member you will be able to:

  • Participate in over 500 dive topic forums and browse from over 5,500,000 posts.
  • Communicate privately with other divers from around the world.
  • Post your own photos or view from well over 100,000 user submitted images.
  • Gain access to our free classifieds marketplace to buy, sell and trade gear, travel and services.
  • Use the calendar to organize your events and enroll in other members' events.
  • Find a dive buddy or communicate directly with scuba equipment manufacturers.

All this and much more is available to you absolutely free when you register for an account, so sign up today!

NEW for 2014 Access SBlogbook for members. It allows you to directly upload data from your dive computer, validate your logs digitally, link your dives to photos, videos, dive centers (9,000 on file), fishes (14,000 on file) and much more.

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact the ScubaBoard Support Team.
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Cardiovascular Fitness & CO2

 


  1. #1
    Registered


    Has not set a "status"
     

    NavyDoll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    111
    Photos
    1

    Cardiovascular Fitness & CO2

    Here's a question that I've been pondering since late last week...

    Is it possible to be TOO cardiovascularly fit for diving??

    I'm an avid scuba diver (imagine that?!)... and I run, cycle and swim to keep in shape and stay healthy! I have naturally low blood pressure (resting ~ 100/65 sometimes lower) and a low resting heart rate (50-55bpm).

    When I dive... my SAC rate is usually between 0.40 CFM & 0.50 CFM. I'm very relaxed in the water at depth and breath at the same rate throughout my dives.

    Last Friday, on a deep dive (137ft)... I experienced a bout of dizziness and shortness of breath. The major thought I had was... "oh ****... I'm going to pass out... I need to go shallower". We began a slow ascent and the symptoms started to disapate above 110-115ft..

    After the dive we discussed the possibility of my being narc'd... but the symptoms didn't really seem to indicate narcosis. Then I looked into CO2 Retention... and it seemed to better describe what I'd experienced.

    We have since concluded that although I breath deep enough... I don't breath often enough (NO.. I'm not SKIP BREATHING)!! I may have reached a point where I'm too cardiovascularly fit... to dive and breath the way that I normally do!!

    So.. my question... has anyone else experienced something similar?? Does anyone else have a high level of cardiovascular fitness that has affected them while diving?? Looking forward to any insight!!

    NavyDoll

    :scuba:

  2. #2
    Registered


    Has not set a "status"
     

    Big-t-2538's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Dayton, OH
    Posts
    3,497
    Dives
    100 - 199

    [QUOTE][i]NavyDoll once bubbled... [/i][B]...

    NavyDoll once bubbled...


    Last Friday, on a deep dive (137ft)... I experienced a bout of dizziness and shortness of breath. The major thought I had was... "oh ****... I'm going to pass out... I need to go shallower". We began a slow ascent and the symptoms started to disapate above 110-115ft..

    After the dive we discussed the possibility of my being narc'd... but the symptoms didn't really seem to indicate narcosis. Then I looked into CO2 Retention... and it seemed to better describe what I'd experienced.
    Rest assured....you were Narc'd....
    "Beer the cause of and solution to all of life's little problems" -Homer Simpson
    Look here...I like DARTS too!!
    I'm also a swim coach now (yikes !!) Coach Tony
    Other diving Sites: DecoStop

  3. #3
    Photographer


    Click
     

    Warren_L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3,084
    Dives
    1,000 - 2,499
    Photos
    43

    [QUOTE][i]NavyDoll once bubbled... [/i][B]...

    NavyDoll once bubbled...

    Last Friday, on a deep dive (137ft)... I experienced a bout of dizziness and shortness of breath. The major thought I had was... "oh ****... I'm going to pass out... I need to go shallower". We began a slow ascent and the symptoms started to disapate above 110-115ft..
    Yep, that sounds pretty well like what happened to me the first time I got narc'd. Symptoms would be alleviated by ascending to a shallower depth.

  4. #4
    Registered


    Has not set a "status"
     

    pipedope's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Side of the hill, Alaska
    Posts
    3,109

    Breathing slow

    Will not cause CO2 buildup, As long as you are not skip breathing.

    Breathing too shallow will.


    Overbreathing a so-so reg also can cause CO2 buildup.

    I would also tend to think narcosis first but check everything, including the reg to make sure you are not having a problem with CO2.

    It could be a very light CO2 hit along with being narced. I don't know exactly how you felt or how your normal responses to trouble are.
    I will tend to *think* "Oh sh**, I gotta go up" when it is mostly a narcosis problem. In a CO2 hit I am at or near panic and there is not really much thinking going on. In the hit I took I was still functioning (barely) but I don't remember much thinking. Training took over and I acted to get out of the situation, i.e. purge the mask, ascend, breath deep and slow as possible.
    Retarded (retired) commercial diver.
    Now just working to survive a dance with Lymphoma.

  5. #5
    Senior Member


    Has not set a "status"
     

    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    5,417

    Hi, NavyDoll.

    The good news is, no, it is not possible to be "TOO cardiovascularly fit for diving."

    The line that demarcates breathing too slowly ("I don't breath often enough") and skip breathing may not always be that clear. In any event, it's all a matter of venting C02 and one could breath slowly enough to cause hypercapnia.

    The signs/symptoms of CO2 retention include rapid respiration, rapid pulse rate, shortness of breath, dizziness, convulsions & unconsciousness. It can also include a whopping headache, usually with onset well into or after the dive.

    Best regards.

    DocVikingo

  6. #6
    Registered


    seafood sifu
     

    100days-a-year's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    NE Florida
    Posts
    1,622
    Dives
    5,000 - ∞
    Photos
    19

    I have about the same metabolic rates, but my...

    I have about the same metabolic rates, but my size precludes a sac that lo.I see it that a high cardio conditioning state can influence your sac and have an effect on narcosis due to lowering the amount of CO2 present,but(caveat here)there are more variables.Depth and PPN2 of course being most important.Wetsuit constriction,equipment efficiency and dead space,air purity,smoking,hydration,and a whole slew of psycological implications from what kind of day you were having to any stress increasing metabolic rates or causing tenseness.What you described to me would be exactly how I would expect someone to feel upon reaching 137' on an air mix in cool water wearing a wetsuit or even a mildly constrictive drysuit even with good equipment.Especially if it was the 1st time at that depth or that site.Rest assured the biggest enemy you had was being Narced.
    www.sustainablefishing.org


  7. #7
    Fitness Instructor


    Has not set a "status"
     

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    361

    Congratulations on your level of fitness. It...

    Congratulations on your level of fitness. It can do much to help improve your safety and enjoyment of diving. Keep diving, and you'll likely see your SAC get even lower.

    If you ever take a mix course, you'll get to see how narc'd you were at 60ft.

    Cameron
    Fitness for Divers - featured in Scuba Diving Magazine and dive magazines worldwide!
    See what readers are saying in their own words!

    DIVEFitness.com
    Better fitness means better diving.

Similar Threads

  1. Getting to decent fitness
    By Wijbrandus in forum Diving Medicine
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: February 21st, 2005, 10:45 AM
  2. Dive fitness
    By carebear in forum Basic Scuba Discussions
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: January 4th, 2004, 01:25 PM
  3. Fitness for diving
    By NJDiveGirl in forum Basic Scuba Discussions
    Replies: 55
    Last Post: October 30th, 2003, 03:27 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •