Welcome to ScubaBoard, an online scuba diving forum community where you can join over 205,000 divers diving from around the world. If the topic is related to scuba diving, this is the place to find divers talking about it. To gain full access to ScubaBoard (and make this large box go away) you must register for a free account. As a registered member you will be able to:

  • Participate in over 500 dive topic forums and browse from over 5,500,000 posts.
  • Communicate privately with other divers from around the world.
  • Post your own photos or view from well over 100,000 user submitted images.
  • Gain access to our free classifieds marketplace to buy, sell and trade gear, travel and services.
  • Use the calendar to organize your events and enroll in other members' events.
  • Find a dive buddy or communicate directly with scuba equipment manufacturers.

All this and much more is available to you absolutely free when you register for an account, so sign up today!

NEW for 2014 Access SBlogbook for members. It allows you to directly upload data from your dive computer, validate your logs digitally, link your dives to photos, videos, dive centers (9,000 on file), fishes (14,000 on file) and much more.

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact the ScubaBoard Support Team.
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 31
Like Tree12Likes

Thread: panic attack followed by headache that doesn't want to go away

 

  1. #11
    Registered


    Has not set a "status"
     

    Limoges Diver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Limoges, ON
    Posts
    85
    Dives
    25 - 49
    Quote Originally Posted by TSandM View Post
    Cracking pressure is how much suction you have to put on the regulator to get the valve to open and deliver air. It should be almost, but not quite effortless. When regulators have a "pre-dive" setting, what that does is increase the cracking pressure, to make it more difficult for air to come out and reduce the likelihood of freeflows. If you don't change that to "dive", you have to work harder than you should to draw air from the regulator, and this can increase the chance of CO2 retention.
    Thank you - thought so, and I could have researched this, but your answer is very clear to the point!

    The point you are making here is that the cracking pressure is something that can be adjusted once you're in the water, right? I have 2 mouthpieces: one with and one without an adjustment. I was told that the one with the adjustment is my back-up one. Anyway. I am now thinking about buying a new regulator, octo, etc... so I know that I have enough air delivery and dependable equipment. I was thinking about a ScubaPro setup that has a lifetime warranty for parts. I know this isn't an equipment-related thread, but does anyone have any recommendations regarding regulators that have lifetime parts warranty and have the ability to give this air hog enough air?

    Now, its Monday morning when replying to you, and I still have soreness in my neck, still am a bit dizzy and I have a slight headache still. 2.5 days later??? If I had not enough air being delivered, would that result in these symptoms? I thought that what I was feeling was Co2 retention. I was also under the understanding that Co2 retention headaches go in a few minutes to a few hours - not a few days.
    Does anyone have any ideas?

    I am assuming that my regulator could get checked out to find out what the cracking pressure is. I want to know even if I'm buying a new regulator since I want to make sure that it was the equipment that failed and not my body.
    Looking for dive mates from Ottawa/Gatineau to Cornwall, Ontario to Brockville, Ontario - no Quebec diving.

    Avid cruiser too - always looking for dive mates in my ports of call

  2. #12
    Registered


    SERIOUSLY ...
     

    Bombay High's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    India
    Posts
    490
    Dives
    5,000 - ∞
    It is possible that your symptoms are completely unrelated to the dive. The dive just triggered it. Even a high CO2 level should not hold symptoms 3 days later.
    On the other hand (and I dont mean to imply that this is the case) the lasting symptoms could be imagined.
    I have a colleague who imagines DCS symptoms after every dive (this is someone who dives for a living).
    Maybe get your tank tested, just to rule out the possibility of bad air .
    Limoges Diver likes this.

  3. #13
    Registered


    Has not set a "status"
     

    Limoges Diver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Limoges, ON
    Posts
    85
    Dives
    25 - 49
    Quote Originally Posted by Bombay High View Post
    It is possible that your symptoms are completely unrelated to the dive. The dive just triggered it. Even a high CO2 level should not hold symptoms 3 days later.
    On the other hand (and I dont mean to imply that this is the case) the lasting symptoms could be imagined.
    I have a colleague who imagines DCS symptoms after every dive (this is someone who dives for a living).
    Maybe get your tank tested, just to rule out the possibility of bad air .
    This is not a case of imagination: I know how I felt and how I feel right now for sure. The headache when I exited the water was so debilitating, I could hardly stand.
    Right now my headache is about a 2/10, my dizziness is about a 4/10, and my neck pain is about 3/10, with Friday afternoon being 10/10 for all 3 categories.

    I will get all my gear tested, but I'm skeptical about the tank itself: I was inspected a year ago, and my incident on Tuesday was with another dive shop's tank and air.

    Does anyone know what the physiological results of breathing through a regulator that doesn't deliver enough air?

    Thanks you.
    Looking for dive mates from Ottawa/Gatineau to Cornwall, Ontario to Brockville, Ontario - no Quebec diving.

    Avid cruiser too - always looking for dive mates in my ports of call

  4. #14
    Divemaster
    Badge


    Has not set a "status"
     

    ktomlinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Statenville, GA
    Posts
    937
    Dives
    200 - 499
    Photos
    32
    In my OW class I got a horrible headache during a swim portion of the class...I thought it was due to exertion, so relaxed a fee minutes and then finished the class. A week or two later I got a horrible headache while working around the house, the same kind of headache that I got in my ow class. Both headaches started at the base of my neck and spread over my entire head and felt like an ice cream headache. I am on the telephone at work for hours a day and think that holding the phone on my shoulder caused the headaches. I have since switched to a headset and haven't had a problem since then. A long story to relate to you that pinched nerves and fatigued muscles can make some pretty bad headaches.
    Limoges Diver likes this.

  5. #15
    Registered


    Has not set a "status"
     

    Limoges Diver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Limoges, ON
    Posts
    85
    Dives
    25 - 49
    Quote Originally Posted by ktomlinson View Post
    In my OW class I got a horrible headache during a swim portion of the class...I thought it was due to exertion, so relaxed a fee minutes and then finished the class. A week or two later I got a horrible headache while working around the house, the same kind of headache that I got in my ow class. Both headaches started at the base of my neck and spread over my entire head and felt like an ice cream headache. I am on the telephone at work for hours a day and think that holding the phone on my shoulder caused the headaches. I have since switched to a headset and haven't had a problem since then. A long story to relate to you that pinched nerves and fatigued muscles can make some pretty bad headaches.
    hmmmm - I had the same problem during my swimming portion of my first OW class, but it was blood-sugar level related: I had not eaten dinner before going to class. But the headache didn't last this long. In fact, I have never had a headache last this long...
    Looking for dive mates from Ottawa/Gatineau to Cornwall, Ontario to Brockville, Ontario - no Quebec diving.

    Avid cruiser too - always looking for dive mates in my ports of call

  6. #16
    Assimilated Medical Mod


    Counting days to CAVEZZZZ!
     

    TSandM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Woodinville, WA
    Posts
    33,534
    Dives
    1,000 - 2,499
    Photos
    28
    Blog Entries
    1
    You don't need to buy a new regulator. Virtually any regulator available today can be adjusted to breathe easily. It's just a service sort of thing. Not all regulators have a pre-dive setting and not all can be user-adjusted. Those are the kind of higher-end "bells and whistles" you get with the more expensive models.

    I agree that a CO2 headache shouldn't persist for three days. Your neck pain now makes me wonder about muscle tension headache, or cervical arthritis. Holding the head back in the horizontal diving position can be painful for some people.
    Limoges Diver likes this.
    "If something goes tits up, don't count on rising to the occasion. You will fall to what you have truly mastered." (PfcAJ)
    My dive journal can be read here, and a current dive blog HERE
    Okay, you've heard all our opinions. Want to know what the science is? http://archive.rubicon-foundation.org/
    www.divematrix.com

  7. #17
    Registered


    Has not set a "status"
     

    Limoges Diver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Limoges, ON
    Posts
    85
    Dives
    25 - 49
    Quote Originally Posted by TSandM View Post
    You don't need to buy a new regulator. Virtually any regulator available today can be adjusted to breathe easily. It's just a service sort of thing. Not all regulators have a pre-dive setting and not all can be user-adjusted. Those are the kind of higher-end "bells and whistles" you get with the more expensive models.

    I agree that a CO2 headache shouldn't persist for three days. Your neck pain now makes me wonder about muscle tension headache, or cervical arthritis. Holding the head back in the horizontal diving position can be painful for some people.
    I read the service manual for my first stage, and it said the outlet pressure must be 140 psig. So I checked the regulator, and adjusted the pressure to 140 psig (it was slightly lower). This adjustment was done several dives ago, and the pressure was tested immediately prior to my div on Friday. So delivery pressure is not the adjustment you are talking about? I still want to have gear that is less than a couple decades old: I want the warm & fuzzy feeling that I don't have to be suspicious about gear that is so important to my survival underwater.
    Looking for dive mates from Ottawa/Gatineau to Cornwall, Ontario to Brockville, Ontario - no Quebec diving.

    Avid cruiser too - always looking for dive mates in my ports of call

  8. #18
    Divemaster
    Badge


    Has not set a "status"
     

    ktomlinson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Statenville, GA
    Posts
    937
    Dives
    200 - 499
    Photos
    32
    I believe you are referring to the pressure is in your lp hoses....cracking pressure is how hard you have to suck/breathe on the second stage in order to trigger the mechanism that gives you access to that 140psi.

  9. #19
    Indescribable!
    Go Red - Support SB!

    is in a cave or wants to be
     

    denisegg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    South Alabama
    Posts
    10,461
    Dives
    500 - 999
    You can give DAN a call. That is what my dive buddy did when I had an incident and it was during a holiday weekend. It was actually on July 4th last year. They were able to access the situation and give the ER doctors instruction on how to treat me. You don't even have to be a member to get their help. I now keep their number programmed into my cell phone and I'm glad that my buddy did that day.
    Denise (good girl)

  10. #20
    Registered


    wonders whether Schrödinger
    liked having pets
     

    Bubbletrubble's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Seussville
    Posts
    4,808
    Dives
    200 - 499
    Photos
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by TSandM View Post
    Cracking pressure is how much suction you have to put on the regulator to get the valve to open and deliver air. It should be almost, but not quite effortless. When regulators have a "pre-dive" setting, what that does is increase the cracking pressure, to make it more difficult for air to come out and reduce the likelihood of freeflows. If you don't change that to "dive", you have to work harder than you should to draw air from the regulator, and this can increase the chance of CO2 retention.
    @TSandM: Actually, on all of the regs that I'm familiar with, cracking pressure isn't affected at all by the Venturi setting (dive/pre-dive or "+"/"-") on a second stage. Put simply, the Venturi lever in the "dive" or "+" position directs airflow to create a suction behind the second stage diaphragm, which makes it easier for the demand valve to remain open. So, essentially, the Venturi lever affects closure of the demand valve...not opening, per se.

    Inappropriate sustained airflow of the second stage is encouraged by setting the Venturi lever to "dive" or "+." Switching the Venturi lever to "pre-dive" or "-" redirects airflow to minimize the suction effect. That's why reg manufacturers recommend that the second stage Venturi lever be placed in the "pre-dive"/"-" position while the diver is on the surface of the water.
    Quote Originally Posted by Limoges Diver View Post
    I read the service manual for my first stage, and it said the outlet pressure must be 140 psig. So I checked the regulator, and adjusted the pressure to 140 psig (it was slightly lower). This adjustment was done several dives ago, and the pressure was tested immediately prior to my div on Friday. So delivery pressure is not the adjustment you are talking about? I still want to have gear that is less than a couple decades old: I want the warm & fuzzy feeling that I don't have to be suspicious about gear that is so important to my survival underwater.
    @Limoges Diver: I feel very strongly that divers should not be monkeying around with reg settings if they don't understand what they are doing. Someone who cannot distinguish the difference between cracking pressure and intermediate pressure really shouldn't be attempting to tune a reg. I recommend that you take your reg setup to a competent reg technician and ask him to check it out for you. He should be able to evaluate intermediate pressure, cracking pressure, and overall behavior of the reg (subjective breathing test). Such an inspection should only take a few minutes to do.

    It also wouldn't be a bad idea to get a medical check-up with your physician. Conditions to rule out would include various neurological and cardiovascular disorders. Ask him/her if a cardiac stress test might be useful.
    Ear Equalization problems? Check out Dr. Kay's Ear Lecture for Divers.

    What would you do? ScubaBoard has a "What if...?" series geared for beginner divers.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Panic Attack
    By srhtech in forum Near Misses and Lessons Learned
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: November 26th, 2008, 03:18 PM
  2. Panic Attack
    By jlwest63 in forum Near Misses and Lessons Learned
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: September 21st, 2007, 06:24 PM
  3. (08 SEP 04) Panic Attack
    By TheDivingPreacher in forum Accidents and Incidents
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: August 10th, 2005, 01:04 PM
  4. Panic Attack
    By Llama256 in forum Basic Scuba Discussions
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: September 30th, 2004, 04:44 PM
  5. Panic Attack
    By bfenne in forum Basic Scuba Discussions
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: August 3rd, 2004, 02:12 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •