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1 Breath swim for NAUI DM swim test

Discussion in 'Q and A for Scuba Certification Agencies' started by eth727, Mar 17, 2010.

  1. H2O 70

    H2O 70 Divemaster

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Baltimore, Maryland
    822
    4
    0
    That is a pool length. I can see how this could be a challenge for some folks. I'm assuming no fins or anything, right?
     
  2. Puffer Fish

    Puffer Fish Captain Happy ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives:
    Location: Knoxville, TN
    8,072
    141
    0
    That is correct.
     
  3. Jasonmh

    Jasonmh ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: New Mexico
    1,403
    5
    38
  4. Aquatic Eagle

    Aquatic Eagle Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Euless, TX
    894
    0
    16
    How far can you make it now?
     
  5. louiemullins

    louiemullins Angel Fish

    6
    0
    0
    holding your breath is tough
     
  6. waterpirate

    waterpirate Solo Diver

    # of Dives:
    Location: Delmarva peninsula
    1,393
    418
    83
    It really is in your mind. Slow and easy with good technique. Being efficient not spastic and convincing yourself this is not a race will see you through. I finished dead last in the boy scouts 1 mile swim, but I exited the water, got checked off, and got on my bicycle and road d it home no sweat. People who were in the race may still be recovering! lol
    Eric
     
  7. DCBC

    DCBC Banned

    4,443
    930
    113
    What may work for one may not for another, but what I would suggest is to:

    a) Be in good physical condition
    b) Hyperventilate (a maximum of 3 breaths)
    c) Relax as much as possible
    d) Make defining strokes in the water, followed by a glide phase
    e) Exhale slightly if you feel that you are needing to breathe.

    This has worked for me and several students who have had difficulty.
     
  8. jjhill

    jjhill NAUI Instructor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Alberta, Canada
    137
    18
    18
    Take it for what it is worth, but for me what works really well it forcing my mind not to think about what I am doing. I find if I focus on something else while I am swimming underwater on my breath hold and not focusing on the fact I am holding my breath, the time goes faster and it is much easier.

    Try thinking about eating french fries, or anything else, this along with a good stroke/glide will allow you to get those last remaining yards.

    Good luck
     
  9. CaptainHornblower

    CaptainHornblower Captain

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Reno, NV
    64
    13
    8
    When I got my certification we had to do something our instructor called circuit breathing. He put tanks at the ends of a 25 meter pool, each set of tanks had three divers, two breathing on the tanks and one swimming from one to the other, when you got to the end you got the regulator and the other guy started swimming, you had to do 10 laps without surfacing to pass. I'm pretty sure we used fins but no mask. The trick was not to rush; if you tried going fast you'd burn out after a lap or two. I remember just trying to get into the "zone", not thinking about how far it was and just following the line on the bottom of the pool.
     
  10. Aquatic Eagle

    Aquatic Eagle Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Euless, TX
    894
    0
    16
    That's a little risky for brand new divers. Snorkelers are always taught to never dive down and breathe off of a friend's regulator due to risk of breath-holding to the surface. The same risk is involved here if the diver feels the flight instinct and bolts for the surface holding his breath.
     

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