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2016 Barracuda Near Attack, looking for causes, behavioral analysis

Discussion in 'Near Misses and Lessons Learned' started by Charlie Vergos, Jun 17, 2017.

  1. foob

    foob Angel Fish

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    Barracuda are very curious fish. That's why that one was following you.

    I haven't tried it yet, but a marine biologist working at a commercial aquarium told me to just go towards the barracuda and make yourself big and threatening and they will leave you alone. Because they are curious but skittish.

    I would take the advice others are giving, to be as relaxed as possible to not make the situation worse.
     
  2. Hotpocket

    Hotpocket Trespasser

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    This is one of those times where it's good to have an instabuddy who swims slower than you do.
     
  3. Sam Miller III

    Sam Miller III Scuba Legend Scuba Legend

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: CALIFORNIA: Where recreational diving began!
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    It is suggest a trip to the local fisherman's supply - aka bait shop to review the Barracuda jigs...
    You will note that they are all bright and shiny, often chromed and so designed as to fluctuate in the water

    Barracudas on both coast are very curious fish and are attracted to bright shinny fluctuating objects, such as an erratic flailing fin.

    It is indeed a pity that you "attack" was not documented for all to view - It would have gone viral in the diving community

    Sam Miller, 111
     
  4. Zeagle Eagle

    Zeagle Eagle Barracuda

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Texas
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    Were your fins splits or paddles?:wink:
     
  5. 60plus

    60plus Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Cumbria UK
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    If you look on Wikipedia it suggests barracuda may think snorkelers are large predators and follow them to share their prey.
    I did my 4th and 5th dives at Lanzarote. On my 4th dive there was a large shoal of barracuda above me, the average size of each fish being a bit over 2 ft. On my 5th dive a large, 5ft plus barracuda passed a few yards above and to one side of us, it took no notice of us but my guide made sure I was aware of it and indicated it could bite. On both occasions there were plenty of other divers prey fish about. Plenty of other divers reported large numbers of barracuda but no reports of anyone actually being bitten.
     
  6. InTheDrink

    InTheDrink DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: UK, South Coast
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    I dunno. Barracudas can be funny. When they attack its like lightning. Has happened to some of my buddies and there was that case where one hit a Diver’s mask and did some damage. I’m happy to swim into a school of them but I’m a little wary of the loners. Sure it’s all rare but they’re fast ****ers and then do seem to like shiny things.
     
  7. InTheDrink

    InTheDrink DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: UK, South Coast
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    Search on here and you’ll find an nasty example. And some buddies of mine got repeatedly attacked by one. They put it down as it was so aggressive
     
  8. rabe

    rabe Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Brisbane
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    This is SO wrong.
     
  9. InTheDrink

    InTheDrink DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: UK, South Coast
    1,987
    231
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    Well it certainly went wrong when they were trying to put it down. I wasn’t there when it happened and yes we’re in their environment not ours but they felt it a serious hazard/risk. I wouldn’t have advocated the same course of action.

    But in relation to the post - Barracudas can indeed very aggressive. I’ve swum through many schools of them without and problem but the occasional once clearly can be dangerous. The risk is still minuscule.
     
  10. rabe

    rabe Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Brisbane
    196
    86
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    that's it, the answer is this sentence
    all the other arguments that they might have used to justify the killing of an animal that was just doing its own things (being an animal) are bullsh*ts
     

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