• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

3 year old snorkeling

Discussion in 'Snorkeling / Freediving' started by DrSteve, Aug 12, 2019.

  1. DrSteve

    DrSteve Divemaster

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Bowie, MD
    1,077
    8
    38
    On vacation I got my just turned 3 year old to repeatedly duck her head under the water with a mask and snorkel for a few seconds. The next day I couldn’t keep her above water - it was so cute to hear her sing Baby Shark and Daddy Finger through her snorkel! I’m a very happy Dad. Unfortunately our local pool won’t allow masks as they “cover the nose” or snorkels :(
     
    txgoose, Sh0rtBus, AfterDark and 3 others like this.
  2. Steve_C

    Steve_C Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Raleigh, NC USA
    4,002
    2,569
    113
    My grandson was terrified of putting his face into the water after a year or two of swim lessons. Loved being in the water. I got him a scuba mask and snorkel. And he tried them in pool at our gym (no lifeguard). He said it is beautiful under there. About the third day I looked over and his head was 3 inches under water breathing through the snorkel. He swims now without the snorkel and with a regular pair of goggles and is on a low key swim team. But he still spends more time under the water than above.
     
    Dark Wolf likes this.
  3. happy-diver

    happy-diver Skindiver ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: queensland Melbourne diver
    684
    376
    63
    Brilliant!
     
  4. AfterDark

    AfterDark Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Rhode Island, USA
    7,813
    3,297
    113
    Good for you! The younger the better!

    I've got a couple of videos I'd like to post but can't. It is my 4 year grandson in the pool with mask fins and snorkel swimming and diving like he was born to it, graceful and confident. Absolutely beautiful!
     
  5. dcvf2

    dcvf2 Angel Fish

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Belgium
    57
    20
    8
    Hi « AfterDark »

    Don’t forget to learn to him.

    "No snorkel in the mouth under the water".

    It’s a security rule by the apneist (AIDA, SSI, Apnea Academy, etc ) …and to compensate the pression on the eardrums …before it hurts and also to compensate the inner volume of the mask... but you know it.:wink:
     
    AfterDark likes this.
  6. AfterDark

    AfterDark Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Rhode Island, USA
    7,813
    3,297
    113
    I hope I can. I'll be 71 when he's 10 doesn't leave me much time. I taught him to exhale a small amount of air into his snorkel when he dives. He was diving with the snorkel on his own. It's a 4 ft pool so no great danger. Thanks @dcvf2
     
  7. dcvf2

    dcvf2 Angel Fish

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Belgium
    57
    20
    8
    Hi "AfterDark"

    You wrote
    « I hope I can. I'll be 71 when he's 10 doesn't leave me much time. »

    I am 77 years old ... I am just giving my 14 year old grandson an "apnea initiation" based on the course I followed with AIDA, theory at home and practice (in a pool of 3 m ... +/- 10 feet)

    You wrote
    I taught him to exhale a small amount of air into his snorkel when he dives.

    I’m sorry to say it’s not at all indicated in free diving. We must hold all our air.

    Don’t hold the snorkel not in your mouth under the water

    1) the tuba is useless under water :wink:
    2) It’s dangerous, it can produce a swallowing reflex, when we hold something between the teeth…I had that at a deep of 24 m ( +/- 75 feet) before I know this security rule.

    I was very lucky at this time…I did not swallow water…( in this eventuality, at this deep I would have drowned).

    I took the right decision by myself … « never again the snorkel in mouth under the water »…confirmed several years later, in the different free diving courses I followed by Apnea Academy, AIDA and SSI Free diving.

    You wrote
    It's a 4 ft pool so no great danger.


    When I began In 1965, before to dive (with mask, fins, snorkel), to know what to do and not to do, I read « Plongée sous-marine » a book written by a Belgian diver .

    It’s in this book I read that a young boy was drowned in a swim pool, with mask, fins, snorkel.
    This fatal accident was explained like this.

    He didn't know he must compensate the mask volume.
    The glass of its huge mask came in contact with its front head.
    Then the inner volume could not more decrease.
    That provoked a traction on the optical nerfs. He lost his conscience and drowned.:(

    I must say it’s not by the scuba divers that we learn how to practice correctly the free diving.:cool:
    They are not trained for that.

    eg
    We were practicing in parallel in the swim pool.
    Us the AIDA free divers and in the other half part of the swim pool, the scuba diver…in « apnea » mode, at the beginning of their training session.
    - One "scuba" asked to the leader : « How to ventilate to hold a longer apnea? »
    - Answer from the scuba leader : « You ventilate until you feel headedness dizziness »

    Remark concerning this answer.
    IT’S TOTALLY OPPOSITE TO THE SAFETY RULES IN APNEA.
    If you feel that, then don’t dive… risk of BO (Black Out)

    Another example…the scuba president was the leader this time.
    He advises to exhale strongly when you surfacing after an apnea.

    Remark concerning this advice .
    Again IT’S TOTALLY OPPOSITE TO THE SAFETY RULES IN APNEA.

    The first exhale must be passivea small expiration (*)…followed by deep cycles ( 3 or 4) inspirations and expirations followed by normal cycles of ventilation.

    (*) -> to avoid to decrease dangerously the PPO2 that can lead to LMC or worst to BO.

    Again.
    I must say it’s not by the scuba divers that we learn how to practice correctly the free diving.
    They are not trained for that.

    Sorry I must say that it’s in your own interest.
     
  8. Sam Miller III

    Sam Miller III Scuba Legend Scuba Legend

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: CALIFORNIA: Where recreational diving began!
    4,670
    3,111
    113
    @dr.steve,

    I just read @dcvf2 technicolor post. Scares hell-Q out of me ! And not too much in diving can scare me !
    Dang ! After all that free diving/spearfishing before amd after the introduction of the French developed but American patented snorkel I discovered I had been doing it all wrong !

    Oh well ! cant teach an old dog new tricks !
    sdm
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    FYI-- This may be of assistance

    Fifty plus years ago my five children and several other pioneer diver's children were tots and excited about diving. All had been born to pioneer SoCal diving families and had grown up in a aquatic./diving world

    Perhaps my experiences can be in some way helpful to you.

    The greatest obstacle was the mask - which your daughter has one that fits and has mastered by emulating you. We discovered in those days of long ago that the off shelf masks were not made for the juvenile faces. We solved the fit problem by modifying their masks with a border of neoprene wet suit rubber it became a very comfortable mask which they used for many years. -- (just a suggestion for the future)

    The next step was to acclimate them to water over the mask. This was readily accomplished by placing a mask over their faces and creating a game of standing under the shower allowing the water to flow over there faces was the highlight to their bath … it was fun for them and also was expected as the highlight of their baths.

    Soon they were snorkeling in the bath tub- what fascinated them us a mystery - But we suspected that in their young minds the were diving into the depths and exploring the unexplored.

    By the time the were 2 to 2-1/2 they were breathing compressed air from a normal sized SCUBA tank on the floor attached to about 3 foot HP hose and modified mouth piece.. It was discovered the normal adult mouth piece was just too large and cumbersome for their mouths so they the were trimmed down with scissors and finished finger nail emery boards ( I suspect today there are ample electronic devices which would trim faster and smother)

    Soon the were in the Pacific ocean -- not to deep or far from shore but in their pre school minds they were divers - just like mom and dad and all the frequent visitors to out busy home

    It was always stressed in our household that diving with Dad and Mom was an earned privilege, not a right ! School and church were paramount, diving was an ancillary activity that was earned by top grades ,school and church activities.

    Dive logs were always completed and must contain a new never previously described item discovered in the UW world -- Now almost 50 years later reading the logs are a source of enjoyment at family gatherings

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    FYI
    read or ignore the following --

    My son Dr, Sam IV grew up in a pioneer OC dive family and has been diving ,since he was very young child, now approaching almost 50 years of diving . He is a NAUI (LIFE) and PADI Instructor, a 1997 SSI Pro 5000 recipient, the youngest diver listed in the 1993 Who's Who of SCUBA Diving and board certified ER & Scrips trained Hyperbaric doctor.

    He began his very youthful diving career using a personal flotation vest aka PFV made from a US Divers flotation bag a Sea Tec-Inflatable systems hose and a dump valve from SCUBA Pro unit.

    On his 7th Christmas he received one of the first BIUs, a full size "At Pac" which are no longer produced. He used this full size unit for about 15 years, when we both agreed it was time for scraping.

    Dive logs were always completed and must contain a new never previously described item discovered in the UW world -- Now almost 50 years later reading the logs are a source of enjoyment at family gatherings

    There is a recent article in NAUI Sources about me and my son.
    I will extract his portion as an attachment so you can read or ignore.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Attachment:

    Samuel Miller IV, was a diver almost from birth. Having first mastered bathtub diving as a toddler-the regulator had a long hose and the cylinder was on the bathroom floor-he graduated to the family pool at age 4 using a MSA cylinder with homemade backpack. At 5 years old, he was in the Pacific Ocean. "Not too deep and not far from shore, but he was underwater, and in his own mind, he was a diver," said his father. Miller IV had a lot of encouragement from his family and also from family friends who were diving luminaries themselves.

    The photo shows "Sammy Miller" on his sixth birthday getting ready for a dive with Dr. Charlie Brown, NAUI's medical adviser, with whom Miller IV dived many times. Brown was interested in learning how a young child adapted to diving.

    By the time he reached his l0th birthday, Miller IV had logged more than 100 open-water dives, and that year, he completed the Los Angeles County and NAUI Scuba Diver courses, although he was too young to be certified. During the summer of his 12th birthday, he was accepted and successfully completed a 40-hour US Divers equipment repair course. At age 18, he became the youngest person listed in Who's Who of Scuba Diving.

    In SoCal diving circles, Miller IV was considered a top hunter and freediving spearfisher. When he turned 18, he was accepted for provisional membership in the Long Beach Neptunes Spearfishing Club, and then into full membership.

    In his spare time, Miller IV designed, fabricated and sold custom-built teakwood spearguns. His guns had a custom-length balance bar measured to the user's arm length and a handle that was shaped from a mold of the owner's gloved hand in the shooting position. During college, he served on weekends as a deckhand on the dive charter boat Golden Doubloon.

    In 1991, Miller IV became a NAUI Instructor (NAUI 13227) and taught scuba at one of the Southern California dive shops. He won a scholarship to the Catalina Chamber course, completed their internship and became a qualified chamber technician. While waiting to enter medical school, he began technical mixed gas diving with his friend Jeff Bozanic, making deep technical dives on a regular basis off the California coast.

    After completing medical school in Pomona, California, and an emergency room residency in Kingman, Arizona, he won a fellowship in hyperbaric diving medicine at University of San Diego Medical Center. At the end of the fellowship in 2008, he accepted a position at Marion Regional Medical Center in Santa Maria, California, where he is currently their director of ER/Hyperbaric Medicine.

    Miller III summed up much of the feelings of him and his family: "The ocean provides bountiful gifts. It's a recreational area to protect for all present and future generations. Everybody should be able to enjoy it.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Hope the helps -- enjoy safe diving

    SAM III


    SDMIII
     

Share This Page