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A Development for Asthmatic Divers: Development of An underwater Inhaler

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba Discussions' started by Ollie Carter, Oct 27, 2020.

  1. Angelo Farina

    Angelo Farina Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Parma, ITALY
    1,576
    2,378
    113
    When I was young, in the eighties, one fellow in our scuba club did suffer of asthma. The symptoms were exacerbated by the fact that you breath very dry air.
    His solution was simple: an humidifier installed between 1st stage and IP hose. It was a small cylinder containing a tubular sponge, which had to be saturated with water. This was very effective creating some sort of mist in the air you breath.
    I suppose that those humidifiers are stll being manufacturer.
    I also suppose that replacing water with some mild, diluted aerosol solution can provide even better effects...
    See here:
    http://shop.divingexpress.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=2181
     
    Ollie Carter likes this.
  2. wnissen

    wnissen ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Livermore, Calif.
    551
    321
    63
    Yes, warmth and moisture help a lot. I have exercise-induced asthma which is normally well controlled. Getting thoroughly warmed up before I start exerting myself helps a lot. If I just jump straight in to copious breaths of cold, dry air, I'll start to wheeze immediately. But that's more like 40F / 5C air. Never had even a light wheeze while diving. And my doctor did sign off.
     
    Ollie Carter, Esprise Me and BlueTrin like this.
  3. Angelo Farina

    Angelo Farina Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Parma, ITALY
    1,576
    2,378
    113
    Ollie Carter likes this.
  4. wnissen

    wnissen ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Livermore, Calif.
    551
    321
    63
    I would be wary of buying a life-support product that brags: "Negative Ions refresh, invigorate and increase alertness. The force of moisture through flow tube crushes water molecules which then attach to oxygen molecules to create negative ions. This generates 7000-8000 pcs/cc with each breath. Similar to levels produced by waterfalls and forests. Every dive should feel this great!"
     
    Ollie Carter and jejton like this.
  5. Ollie Carter

    Ollie Carter Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: United Kingdom
    13
    3
    3
    ah my bad, i didnt realise that there were cases of asthma where an inhaler isnt needed, ill be sure to add that :) thanks
     
    wnissen likes this.
  6. Ollie Carter

    Ollie Carter Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: United Kingdom
    13
    3
    3
    interesting, different product though. Dry air is a trigger for attacks, ill be looking at delivering the preventative :)
     
  7. BlueTrin

    BlueTrin ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: London
    1,694
    823
    113
    I think, in theory, anyone who has asthma should carry an inhaler but some people who have infrequent mild asthma may not have one.
     
    Ollie Carter likes this.
  8. Esprise Me

    Esprise Me Kelp forest dweller ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Los Angeles, CA
    946
    1,188
    93
    The RSTC forms also ask if you have ever had asthma, not just whether you do currently. It's quite common for people who had asthma as children to outgrow it and either experience no symptoms, or only mild symptoms not requiring treatment. Some of those folks may still keep an inhaler around, just in case, and might even be interested in a product like this. Doctors especially might be quicker to sign off on diving if this were an option for those folks.
     
    Ollie Carter likes this.
  9. Ollie Carter

    Ollie Carter Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: United Kingdom
    13
    3
    3
    great point, it would be something if effective maybe they could relax the rules on diving with asthma slightly. In the uk alone 12% of people have it, so even if 1 of those percent are now able to learn, thats another 600,000 or so people eligible in the uk alone
     
    Esprise Me likes this.
  10. Doc

    Doc Was RoatanMan

    # of Dives: None - Not Certified
    Location: Chicago & O'Hare heading thru TSA 5x per year
    10,033
    2,850
    113
    I hold three patents on devices that are unmarketable simply due to projected liability insurance costs. All are for attractive, remarkable and innovative products, causing sufficient demand to far exceed investment, mold costs, etc.

    What level of liability incurs with SCUBA gear? Flippers, masks, regulators, or...how about inserting goo into the pressurized Reg Set system? What could possibly go wrong?

    And really, that’s not the issue. You can have the safest widget in the world, once you enter into a certain group of products, you share that liability burden equally. Frustrating but true.

    I don’t bother to make things, been there, done that. I sell my patents. Once liability insurance figures in, i have nothing any manufacturer would be interested in.

    Now, factor in the extremely limited application and market.

    The numbers will defeat you.
     
    tridacna and Ollie Carter like this.

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