• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

A question for SSIGuy...

Discussion in 'SSI: Scuba Schools International' started by The Chairman, Apr 14, 2008.

  1. The Chairman

    The Chairman Chairman of the Board

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Cave Country!
    55,915
    23,287
    113
    Ok, I have heard of SSI and have even walked by your booth umpteen times at the trade shows. So I have to ask: Why SSI? Let me get specific for you:

    How old is SSI?

    Why was it created? IOW, what need did you fill?

    How many training centers/shops are SSI? What did they have to do to become one?

    How many instructors are SSI? How do you become an SSI instructor?

    Thanks in advance and I am looking forward to reading your answers!
     
  2. SSIGuy

    SSIGuy Dive Con

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Fort Collins,CO
    9
    0
    0
    Hello Pete,

    I hope this answers your questions.

    Over 35 Years of Experience
    For over 35 years SSI has been known in the diving industry for providing high quality education and outstanding training materials for divers of all levels.

    History
    SSI was founded in 1970 and is the largest school-based training agency in the world.
    In the spring of 1999, SSI merged with the National Association of Scuba Diving Schools (NASDS founded in 1967) and created a new synergy in the dive industry. The sales and marketing expertise of NASDS, when joined with the renowned educational products of SSI, created a stronger company that is in a better position to serve dealers, instructors, and ultimately, divers. Together, SSI and NASDS are responsible for a remarkable list of innovations and consequently have been recognized with the highest honors in the diving industry. Some of our most noteworthy accomplishments include:
    • First to require open water classes for certification.
    • First integrated teaching systems.
    • First to require six open water dives for certification.
    • Created a sales and marketing program to benefit retailers.
    • First to require visual inspections of cylinders.
    • Introduced a buoyancy compensator device.
    • First to introduce an alternate second-stage.
    • First full-motion video training system.
    • Development of an equipment inspection program.
    • Development of the Risk Awareness system.
    • First to develop a Total Dive Log and complete Recognition System.
    • Bob Clark, founder of SSI, and John Gaffney, founder of NASDS, were both given the “Reaching Out Award” and inducted into the scuba industry’s hall of fame in 1999.
    • Ed Christini received the “Reaching Out Award” and was inducted into the hall of fame in 2003.
    • Also in 1999, Bob Clark was honored with the prestigious NOGI award for his contributions to dive education; an award previously given to John Gaffney.

    Worldwide
    Since the first SSI Regional Center opened in Southeast Asia in 1983, SSI has expanded around the world at a very rapid pace. This helps ensure that SSI Certification Cards are welcomed all over the planet, wherever you choose to dive.
    Each regional center is operated by a professional staff that handles everything from certification card production to training of SSI Instructors. The marketplace is often different from country to country, so SSI Regional Centers have some latitude to adapt the SSI System to meet the needs of divers in their region.

    Involvement
    As well as being a leader in the scuba industry, SSI was one of the founding members of the Recreational Scuba Training Council (RSTC), and was crucial in the development of the Universal Referral Program (URP).

    HOW TO GET INVOLVED IN BECOMING AN SSI INSTRUCTOR

    We currently have over 43000 instructors and over 2500 dive centers world wide.

    Continuing Education. If you are interested in developing the skills and knowledge of an instructor, but not necessarily becoming active, you can still take the SSI leadership programs. Discuss your desire with your SSI Facility and start your program today.

    Full- or Part Time Career. Visit your local SSI Facility and learn more about the instructor program. Upon completion of your program apply at your local facility or check out our job-placement-database to post your resume and research various openings worldwide.

    Crossover. SSI offers a convenient crossover program for instructors affiliated with recognized agencies. Our premise is that since you are already and instructor, you only need to know how the SSI System and Philosophy function.


    WHAT TO DO?

    Becoming a SSI Dive Leader is as simple as 1-2-3

    1. Study Your Academic Materials at Home. By studying your materials at home before attending your training program, you will utilize your time better. This will also allow you to maximize the information the course has to offer.

    2. Attending the Instructor Training Course. SSI Training Programs are active learning environments, focusing on practical application, real-world skills, and role-playing exercises. When you graduate, you will possess the dive business knowledge and the skills to be a professional in retail and resort businesses.

    3. Start Teaching. The SSI Website ... loading features a job-placement-database so that you can post your resume online, as well as locate SSI Facilities looking for your special talents. You will find this service here.


    Contact your local SSI FACILITY for more information.

    http://www.dive-ssi.com/facilities

    Thank you for your questions,
     
  3. The Chairman

    The Chairman Chairman of the Board

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: Cave Country!
    55,915
    23,287
    113
    Now THAT is a complete answer! I love it!

    I hope you don't mind if I continue with a few more questions. :D

    It's great to see where SSI has been, can you tell us where you see it going?

    What are the biggest issues facing our industry today?

    As the credit crunch and fuel prices seem to dog all of us, how can we keep the spark alive for Scuba Diving?

    What is the biggest piece of advice you would want to pass on to a small shop or someone wanting to start a shop?
     
  4. fisherdvm

    fisherdvm Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location:
    3,578
    47
    48
    I am confused. You said you're the first to require 6 OW dives?

    My son was certified in June 2007, and he had only 4 OW dives, and one snorkeling swim which was listed as an OW dive. In effect, he had really only 4 OW dive, all 4 were exactly 20 minutes long. Is that a new requirement this year?

    Now if you decrease the OW dive requirement to just 15 minutes, why is that better than just 4 OW dives that last longer? I can see the benefit in learning how to disassemble the gear and replace it, and to emphasize the importance of a correct assent and descent. But let me know what is required on the SI of these dives.

    My next question is, why doesn't SSI require the learning of how to breath from a free flowing regulator? With many divers wanting to do cold water dives, it seems a simple and essential skill to manage and learn.
     
  5. SSIGuy

    SSIGuy Dive Con

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Fort Collins,CO
    9
    0
    0
    Hello Fisherdvm,

    Sorry for any confusion, In the history of SSI. Here is the explanation of the statement.

    In 1975 Bob Clark decided that SSI’s entry-level scuba course would require six open water dives for certification. The course would be call the Advanced Open Water Diver course. The first dive was the skin diving portion and was simply an introduction and transition to open water from the warm, clear pool. Dives two through five were on scuba and were designed to make the students comfortable in the open water with their pool skills, to teach them new open water techniques such as navigation, and to wean them away from the care and control of the instructor. To that end, the sixth dive was the “fun” dive where the divers entered and exited the water under the instructor’s watchful eye, but they planned and executed the actual dive on their own, the final cutting of the umbilical so they were ready to go diving without the instructor.

    As far as the question reguarding why doesn't SSI require the learning of how to breath from a free flowing regulator?

    The answer is that our instructors can choose to teach that skill if it is appropreate for the area of the world they are teaching in. As a previous store owner in Southern Oregon we did in fact teach that very skill as an SSI dealer.

    I hope this helps.
     
  6. tstormdiver

    tstormdiver Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Kentucky
    6,171
    1,126
    113
    Having just recently crossed over to SSI for my professional training (currently a Dive Control Specialist & getting ready to move on to Open Water Scuba Instructor), I must admit that I am quite impressed by the quality of the education program. It is very thorough on most, if not all parts. I also like the way SSI gives the instructors room to add in their own experiences & other skills that may be needed in a certain environment. As a Dive Con, I make a point of sitting in on even the lectures of the classes I'm assisting with to help build a rapport with the students & to continue to observe the teaching styles of the instructors at the shop. I pick up little hints, cues & ideas every time I attend the sessions. I am very much looking forward to the up coming instructor course!
     
  7. nereas

    nereas Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Expat Floridian travelling in the Land of Eternal
    2,735
    6
    0
    SSI is second behind PADI in terms of numbers of world wide affiliated scuba resorts. This is one of their major strengths.

    This allows you to take the classroom and pool sessions of the certification course near your home at a local store, and then complete the ocean portions at a warm water resort. I know you have all heard of this procedure, but unless you can find an affiliated resort in the location of your planned vacation, it does not work.

    PADI and SSI have the highest number of such affiliated resorts.

    And SSI, compared with PADI, is miles ahead in terms of thoroughness of training and sophistication of student materials.
     
  8. fisherdvm

    fisherdvm Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location:
    3,578
    47
    48
    So the bottom line is,

    SSI now really require only 4 OW dives, and 1 OW snorkel and fin swim. What you were talking about is simply the history.

    Right??
     
  9. SSIGuy

    SSIGuy Dive Con

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Fort Collins,CO
    9
    0
    0
    Hello Fisherdvm,

    Yes I am sorry that I didnt finish the statement with now SSI only requires four scuba dives and one snorkel to meet the standards for open water diver. I hope this better answers your question.

    Dive Safe,
     
  10. garyfotodiver

    garyfotodiver Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Chicago, but dive in FL. Not true anymore, as I di
    1,308
    4
    0
    I like SSI, not only because their philosophy as I read it from their website is similar to mine, but their practicing professionals must be associated with a dive shop or other SSI affiliated organization.
     

Share This Page