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Alec Pierce Scuba - Long Hose Good or Bad

Discussion in 'Advanced Scuba Discussions' started by loosenit2, Sep 19, 2019.

  1. Brian Huff

    Brian Huff Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: North Carolina
    116
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    (underline mine)

    The video is 16 minutes long, he talks about that piece of it about 30-60 seconds. Not sure that's "a lot"
     
    pauldw likes this.
  2. Bob DBF

    Bob DBF Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
    6,722
    7,159
    113
    I am old school, and some say a curmudgeon, but don't care how anyone dives, or length of their hose.

    Now as far as calling the alternate second stage an octopus, everyone should know it's the whole reg set is the octopus, just look at it! That is how it got its name with adding on the SPG and the inflator hose, then another for a drysuit, and the alternate second. What's this diving world coming to when we can't even use the proper terminology.


    Never Mind

    Bob
     
  3. formernuke

    formernuke Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: New England
    603
    329
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    Now you've done it, octo means 8, so we need to add 3 more hoses to make it a true octopus.
     
    Bob DBF likes this.
  4. Bob DBF

    Bob DBF Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
    6,722
    7,159
    113
    Back when one was the rule, that's probably why they are still sold that way, 3 looked like an octopus. Or we couldn't count as well.


    Bob
     
    shoredivr, formernuke and dead dog like this.
  5. wetb4igetinthewater

    wetb4igetinthewater Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Seattle
    3,913
    2,281
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    I really don’t understand why anyone thinks donating the primary and switching to a necklaced backup is so risky. If someone is afraid of not having a reg in their mouth for less than 5 seconds, maybe diving isn’t for them. May I suggest knitting?
     
    Kmart921, markmud, BlueTrin and 9 others like this.
  6. formernuke

    formernuke Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: New England
    603
    329
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    5 seconds I have mine in 1
     
  7. Bob DBF

    Bob DBF Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
    6,722
    7,159
    113
    By insisting that it is risky reinforces their opinion that it should not be done "for safety sake". And with that reasoning, how could anyone object to the safe way.

    Personally, I'd run that out to 30, but I'm just a diver.

    Well, it's not really a race, and it's not about the time it normally takes, what you need is time when things don't go as planned and you are there with the reg out of your mouth trying to sort out what to do next.


    Bob
     
  8. MichaelMc

    MichaelMc Divemaster Candidate

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Berkeley, CA
    1,495
    816
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    Reading through some of the reply chains on youtube convinces me Alec is being deliberately obtuse. They are a depressing read. Hats off to those still trying to set the story straight there. But Alec is working against it.

    I'm fine with preferring one way or another. I'm not fine with comments like 'If one might not work, I'll plan on keeping the one I've got'. Or replying to corrections on neck wraps and comments on local dive temps, with I hear you comments on local dive temps.
     
  9. Ayisha

    Ayisha DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Toronto, Canada
    2,934
    1,200
    113
    It really takes only about 1 - 2 seconds. In my training, I was switching pretty instantaneously from the primary to backup in probably one second, and I was told to slow it down.

    I was donating the primary with my right hand and by the time the "victim" had control of the reg, I had already located my backup with my left hand and popped it in my mouth. Easy peasy and I'm sure under a second.

    They asked me to wait until the victim had taken a breath or two, so maybe a few seconds.

    One of my instructors could switch to his backup without hands by just ducking his chin. I've never tried.

    Keep in mind that this was right after Alec reiterated to me his concerns about 2 divers without a reg in their mouth at the same time, since I was switching to a long hose, and I discussed it with the instructor.

    You can take a moment to donate when you're ready. It doesn't have to be the split second that you get the signal. If you just exhaled, you can inhale and then donate. You can also have your backup ready in your hand before you take your primary reg out.

    I find that no different than with practicing the old buddy breathing. You took a couple of breaths and then passed the reg back. You likely chose to pass it back after you inhaled rather than exhaled.
    It's also just like a reg re and re. Many of us have had a reg sculled/kicked out and it was a non-issue, even if you just exhaled.
     
    shoredivr and Sam Miller III like this.
  10. shoredivr

    shoredivr Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Ontario
    8,256
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    Having a reg out of the donor’s mouth as a perceived safety issue is one quarter part of his argument against long hoses for rec divers. He spends some time countering this perceived safety issue by showing how to use a yellow octo in the triangle, and an even longer time talking how an OOA diver can grab an octo from an inattentive (photographer) buddy. That’s all in the same category, air sharing, to me, and it’s significant for his POV.

    The rest of his argument is:

    long hoses require training and practice (how is that different from every other part of Scuba?)

    they are complicated to use (the sidemount video clip he includes shows that is untrue)

    long hoses are used by a minority of rec divers so will be unfamiliar to most (so are Scubapro AirIIs, and I note that Alec’s store is a Scubapro dealer; familiarizing your buddy with your gear is a routine we are all supposed to do pre-dive so using an unfamiliar piece of equipment like an AirII, wing or long hose is easily dealt with)

    they are from the tech world of cave and wreck diving (sorry to break it to you, but BCDs and a second regulator for a buddy’s out-of-air emergency also come from cave diving, and oddly enough these are totally acceptable and uncomplicated, and don’t require any more than usual training for recreational scuba divers).
     

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