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Anything simpler than Open Water?

Discussion in 'New Divers and Those Considering Diving' started by 1LE, Jan 10, 2018.

  1. gypsyjim

    gypsyjim I have an alibi ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: capitol region of New York
    28,477
    17,842
    113
    Since the greatest changes in gas pressure occur in the first 33 feet of depth, "swallow" dives, as in 10 feet or so might be far more dangerous for the unprepared and untrained "diver" than they are thinking.
    "Scuba diving in shallow water, usually regarded as safe, causes the bends in dozens of Australians each year, a conference was told yesterday. ... "It is now clear that even shallow waterdives can produce decompression sickness," said Dr Griffiths, director of the Hyperbaric Medical Unit at Townsville Hospital.May 15, 2002
    Bends warning on diving in shallow water - theage.com.au
     
  2. TMHeimer

    TMHeimer Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Dartmouth,NS,Canada(Eastern Passage-Atlantic)
    9,814
    1,720
    113
    Interesting. My dives are almost always to that depth, and I may ascend 2-4 times just to get my bearings (just easier than using the compass since I zig zag a lot, and can practice CESA once in a while when I ascend). I don't do any extreme exercising, though. It would be interesting to find out if those compiling these statistics have figured out the mechanics of why these divers get the bends with such little nitrogen in their tissues--unless these shallow dives are very lengthy and the 120 minute compartment or so comes into effect?
     
  3. TMHeimer

    TMHeimer Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Dartmouth,NS,Canada(Eastern Passage-Atlantic)
    9,814
    1,720
    113
    I think we all understand what you are saying, but can't figure why it's so hard to get a weekend trip to the quarry during "usable" weather, when you said you/they basically had all summer. How far IS the quarry?
     
  4. TMHeimer

    TMHeimer Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Dartmouth,NS,Canada(Eastern Passage-Atlantic)
    9,814
    1,720
    113
    Yes, a topic often discussed. The recommended depth is for when you start out, but you gradually can expand that, you're just not given any recommendations on how to do that. Diving with a pro to deeper depths then to those depths without a pro seems to be one recommendation. Another way is to gradually increase depth without a pro--like the OW diver with 1,000 dives--ei. being logical and careful. No specific advice is given on these methods. But, you must get AOW to get a "recommended" depth of 100', and you can get that immediately after OW course, pretty much what I did. Of course, those AOW dives are with an instructor, but it's still not a lot of experience to just start doing that on your own.
     
  5. scagrotto

    scagrotto Barracuda

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Hudson Valley
    270
    194
    43
    Is the quarry you can't manage to get to Gilboa? Google Maps seem to think that it's only an hour away from Sylvania, so it doesn't seem like there should be hurdles so insurmountable that you can't manage to find a couple of days in May or June, before reaching the anniversary of your "early summer" 2017 start. And that's not even a real deadline since some time with the instructor will restart the clock.

    And FWIW, that OW cert doesn't give you limits that are beyond what you think you want to do. Other than some dive ops that will insist on an AOW for some dives it doesn't give you any limits at all. OTOH, it doesn't give you much knowledge or experience, either. Rather than being like a private pilot certificate you should think of it as a student pilot certificate. It's a basic entry level certification that indicates that you've met the requirements to solo, and start to build the experience that will really make you competent.

    That said, I take it your dive buddy also needs to finish the class? It's obviously a rather good idea to be competent, but you don't need a C-card to go diving. All you need is a way to get tanks filled, and one guy with a card can take care of that.
     
  6. gypsyjim

    gypsyjim I have an alibi ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: capitol region of New York
    28,477
    17,842
    113
    rofl3.gif

    I can relate.
    In 95, as my marriage failed, I enrolled in a Tae Kwon Do school across the road from my shop, just for exercise and stress relief.
    I told the Korean Master who I knew as a customer of mine, that I had zero interest in "pursuing belts", of actually getting into martial arts seriously, but I needed an outlet for my frustration and anger.

    10 years later I was an Assistant Instructor.

    Sometimes you do not know what will interest, or where it may lead you, until you open a door and try something new.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2018
    Dogbowl and Searcaigh like this.
  7. 1LE

    1LE Angel Fish

    # of Dives: None - Not Certified
    Location: Sylvania, OH
    6
    1
    3
    I presume that's the one? I don't remember the name right now, but about an hour trip (each way) sounds right. We both need to get it done. Weekends with more than a couple hours free are hard to come by. Of course, maybe that's telling me something too. Might not be worth throwing any more time and money at if I won't have time to use it anyways. Maybe just drop it for now, then go through it again after retirement (if still medically able).
     
  8. Dogbowl

    Dogbowl Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Toronto, Canada
    943
    387
    63
    Wow, you’re a busy man! Looks like you’ve already made up your mind though. If it’s at all important to you, I’d suspect you’d be able to find several hours on a weekend to finish the course. Obviously, it’s not a high priority item for you. :wink:
     
  9. 1LE

    1LE Angel Fish

    # of Dives: None - Not Certified
    Location: Sylvania, OH
    6
    1
    3
    Unfortunately, yeah, way too busy. Full time job and my spare time/days off go into keeping the house from caving in on my head and the cars running. Learning to fly was easier than diving. I worked right next door to the airport so I only needed a block of 2 hours for each training session every week or 2. Checkrides were 4 hours, but without any travel time to speak of and just one every couple of years or so as I progressed through it did happen. Took me 4 years to get a motorcycle endorsement once I decided to do it because you need 3 days in a row available for the course... Really love popping over to the pool for a couple hours for diving, but add in *another* 2 hours of driving and doing so multiple times in a short window of time and hence the problem. If I can keep getting my date bumped up maybe at some point I'll be able to at least get my card (even if I never get to use it "for real"), but if my training expires and I have to start over...

    Today I had a whopping 40 minutes of spare time in between getting home and my next meeting (rapidly coming up)... Sigh. Worse places than to here to burn a few minutes I guess. :)
     
    Dogbowl likes this.
  10. gypsyjim

    gypsyjim I have an alibi ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: capitol region of New York
    28,477
    17,842
    113
    Being too busy sure beats having too much free time, due to being unemployed or unemployable.
     

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