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Are you calling me?

Discussion in 'Marine Science & Conservation' started by chillyinCanada, Dec 9, 2019.

  1. chillyinCanada

    chillyinCanada ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

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  2. AfterDark

    AfterDark Solo Diver

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    What keeps the fish there? I didn't see that in the article. No matter the sounds they will get hungry and need food or they'll looking for it.

    I've often wondered if using sound to lure whales out of waterways they've have become disorientated in and back to the ocean as been done successfully. Interesting subject IMO.

    Plastic water bottles can be used to attract sharks to your position, rather quickly evidently.
     
  3. chillyinCanada

    chillyinCanada ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

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    I wondered the same. The article seemed to hint that the fish would clean up bits of the reef so coral could re establish and then other life would return and so on and so on.
     
    AfterDark likes this.
  4. drjtprice

    drjtprice Contributor

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Saxlingham Nethergate England
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    The fish stayed around for the length of the experiment (I believe it was 40 days). When coral is bleached it often grows algae and one of the recovery issues is lack of fish to keep the algae in check (in areas where they are heavily fished/dynamite fished). So, there is food there, and the big fish can eat the little fish. It is not meant to be the only action taken. One of the aims is to use this in places where other coral reintroduction efforts are taking place to 'head start' recovery activities.
     
    chillyinCanada and AfterDark like this.
  5. formernuke

    formernuke ScubaBoard Sponsor ScubaBoard Sponsor

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  6. tarponchik

    tarponchik Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
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    Why not simply drop bread crumps over dead coral? Lots of fish would be attracted.
     
  7. drjtprice

    drjtprice Contributor

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Saxlingham Nethergate England
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    If you are talking about in Great Barrier Reef National Park - very illegal. Also, starts at the wrong place in the food chain (medium to large fish). Many of the sounds in the recording are shrimp, other invertebrates.
     
    AfterDark likes this.
  8. Johnoly

    Johnoly ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

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    They should play some famous music underwater to test the results.
    Like Jimmy Buffet - " Fins to the Left, Fins to the Right "

    And if Viz is terrible then...
    AC/DC - " Back in Black "

    That reef will come to life real quickly !!
     
  9. FreeFlyFreak

    FreeFlyFreak Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: California
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    DAMN!
    Note to self, leave the plastic water bottle on shore.....

    Im just glad they dont have the same reaction to the sound of bubbles.
     
    AfterDark and Bowers like this.
  10. tarponchik

    tarponchik Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: USA
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    Yeah, right. And it promotes "unnatural behavior"! I had always considered it BS when humans fish out whatever they like from the sea and poison corals with excessive CO2, then talk about the importance of keeping survivors to their natural behavior and the integrity of food chains. Too late, cause all food chains in the oceans are broken now by overfishing and the corals are dying en masse, so such pseudoscientific puritanism causes nothing but harm.
     
    WeRtheOcean likes this.

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