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Backplate?

Discussion in 'Hogarthian Diving' started by letterboy, Sep 9, 2004.

  1. divad

    divad Solo Diver

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    Yes. So on the "outside" I put a threaded tri-glide and on the inside I put a second half threaded triglide which automatically goes perpendicular to the threaded triglide and stops it.And there is definatly a "best" way to do it but there's no way I'm going to try to articulate that. Its intuitive.
    It might be nonsense, I've never seen it, but it works great.
    I probably don't even need it, but I'll figure that out eventually.
     
  2. Green_Manelishi

    Green_Manelishi Solo Diver

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    It's not tremendously difficult. You need:

    1) patience
    2) a hard enough bit (preferably two)
    3) a lubricant
    4) a "punch" to mark the plate so the drill bit does not
    skid all over the place
     
  3. The Kraken

    The Kraken He Who Glows in the Dark Waters (ADVISOR) ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Roswell/Alpharetta, GA
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    A quick note:
    With stainless steel please don't use a lubricant. A lubricant will reduce the "bite" of the drill bit, cause it to slip on the metal generating heat and causing the stainless steel to "work harden". You'll burn up several drills in this manner. A bit of water on the point that's being drilled every now and then is sufficient.

    And as Green said, a punch, or small pilot drill is beneficial for creating a pilot hole so that your drill doesn't walk around. When drilling use a relatively low speed for drilling stainless because of its tendencies to work harden. Slow speed, heavy feed . . .
     
  4. Green_Manelishi

    Green_Manelishi Solo Diver

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    Not being knowledgable, I asked at the 'hahdware' store before I tried it. I was specifically told to (sparingly) use a lubricant. If my memory is correct the advice included "Go slooooow and if smoke starts to rise, you are drilling too fast."

    I did in fact successfully drill two holes in the BP. But I think I'd rather not make a habit of the activity. :eyebrow:
     
  5. The Kraken

    The Kraken He Who Glows in the Dark Waters (ADVISOR) ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Roswell/Alpharetta, GA
    11,156
    85
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    Yep, if you're not using a drill press it can be a real booger. A lubricating coolant is need only if you're going deep and need it to help relieve the chips from the hole being drilled.
     
  6. ^*^BATMAN^*^

    ^*^BATMAN^*^ Nassau Grouper

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    you want a coolant, not a lubricant, though i could be wrong, i do more actuall machineing, with mills and lathes than drilling some holes in SS.
     
  7. divad

    divad Solo Diver

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    just take it to a machine shop.
     
  8. kidspot

    kidspot Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Moses Lake, Washington
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    I have an abyss plate just like that one - though mine is purple - I found that if I use smooth triglides they would slip through the slots - but the serrated ones worked fine - they are just slightly larger.

    And I'm not sure what kind of ss steel they are made of, but I remember trying to drill some 440ss a few years back . . . after 4 carbide bits I succeeded (the hole was about 3/8 inch diameter and the steel was 3/16" thick) I decided that I would never try that again, of course I may have been doing something wrong, but if I could find a shop to do it I would. - I have also wondered if the halcyon pack would fit on it.

    Tim
     
  9. SDAnderson

    SDAnderson Dive Charter

    # of Dives:
    Location: On a good day, Lake Michigan
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    It's an Abyss Explorer plate - see the logo "A" punched in the channel. It's a 1/8th inch 316 stainless steel powder coated plate that came in a variety of colors.

    Without modification, neither the OMS Back Pad nor the Halcyon MC Storage Pak will attach properly to this plate. Modifying either the back plate (discussed at some length in this thread) or the storage pouch is a major aggravation unless you have the skills and tools to do so and may result in inferior performance.
     
  10. DiverRick69

    DiverRick69 Angel Fish

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    Use a cobalt bit, goes through stainless like butter. I've also been told that the titanium nitride (TiN) bits work well in stainless, but I already have the cobalts , so haven't actually tried one.
     

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