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Bad attitudes about solo diving are still prevalent

Discussion in 'Solo Divers' started by 2airishuman, Nov 10, 2018.

  1. gcarter

    gcarter Orca

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Ottawa, Canada
    8,418
    9,031
    113
    That is one of the things I love about our local divers here. Regular Wet Wednesday dives on the St Lawrence during the summer, open to all, lots of experienced buddies for newbies, and a genuine enjoyment of introducing newbies to the fun of the river. We can get upwards of 40 on a Wednesday night.

    Having said that, I wouldn't do a two hour dive to a quarry on spec.
     
    Barnaby'sDad likes this.
  2. wetb4igetinthewater

    wetb4igetinthewater Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Seattle
    3,693
    1,950
    113
    Recently on one of the solo diver pages of which I’m a member someone posted that their friend died from solo diving. Obviously this is false and someone was grieving. I cut such people slack but I am concerned to whether they accept that their friend had a medical condition or negligent in some way.
     
  3. Rollin Bonz

    Rollin Bonz Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Georgia, the state, not the country ;-)
    355
    273
    63
    Exactly. All about liability and insurance. Dove a quarry this weekend with a buddy, but thought I might come back solo later. Close to a 2 hour drive, so wanted to be sure it was allowed. Spoke to the owner and he said they could not allow/condone even certified solo diving under his insurance policy. I don't think it's anyone's desire to micturate in anyone's toasted flakes of corn, but the owner is understandably afraid of being sued/held liable and loosing his arse if something happens .
     
    JamesBon92007 and Barnaby'sDad like this.
  4. rjack321

    rjack321 Captain

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Port Orchard, WA
    9,059
    2,920
    113
    How is that "obviously false"?
    People can die while solo diving.
    Deciding that soloing was a root cause, a contributing factor, or completely unrelated is rarely obvious.
     
    TrimixToo likes this.
  5. wetb4igetinthewater

    wetb4igetinthewater Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Seattle
    3,693
    1,950
    113
    I didn’t say that solo diving is the cause of death. The person died while solo diving. They may have had a medical condition. The only issue I can see is an entanglement where they were not able to extract themselves. But then one could examine their configuration.
     
  6. rjack321

    rjack321 Captain

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Port Orchard, WA
    9,059
    2,920
    113
    Divers have had bad gas and gotten confused from the contaminants and had to be lead out of a cave (by a buddy)
    Divers have vomited due H2S or just seasickness and had to be assisted to the surface (by buddies)
    Divers have gotten narced and gone down instead of up
    There are a whole lot of non-medical, non-equipment, "bad judgment" ways to expire underwater.
     
  7. wetb4igetinthewater

    wetb4igetinthewater Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Seattle
    3,693
    1,950
    113
    Okay, so divers didn’t check gas for carbon monoxide. If two divers get their gas from the same source they are still in trouble. Narcosis? Sounds like they should be using helium.

    Seasickness? We’re they seasick before getting into the water?

    So yes, bad judgment that sounds like it began before getting into the water. If good judgment is used, then as long as a medical emergency doesn’t occur, they should be equipped and trained to handle it.
     

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