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Brain fog during and after deep(ish) /multiple dives

Discussion in 'Diving Medicine' started by MykaDives, Sep 11, 2019.

  1. Jack Hammer

    Jack Hammer Solo Diver

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    It's easy to build up CO2 when not breathing in a natural manner. Breathing shallow and skipping/delaying breaths doesn't allow for the CO2 to flush out of the lungs. Some folks further complicate this by breathing irregular in an attempt to control bouyancy. Deep and natural breathing, some folks reference yoga breathing, helps minimize CO2 buildup and reduces overall consumption.
     
    MykaDives likes this.
  2. aviator8

    aviator8 Photographer

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    It is worth calling DAN and speaking to medical staff there. They can also help you locate a doctor close to you that is experienced in diving physiology.
     
    MykaDives likes this.
  3. arew+4

    arew+4 Barracuda

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    Based on BMI and gas consumption, i would guess you are in pretty good shape. What is your resting heart rate? Is it possible that the "diving response" is pushing it low enough that symptoms related to Bradycardia might become perceptible?
     
  4. MykaDives

    MykaDives DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: SK, Canada
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    No. It came on suddenly, and left suddenly. Was very weird.

    Yikes! I am glad you are safe! I am female though, so my risk factor is much lower. I regularly exercise to 180 BPM, so I don't think I could handle that if I had a cardiac issue. The tunnel vision only happened once.

    I definitely use breath control for buoyancy fine tuning - maybe I am doing this too much. I do not breathe shallow, always very deep. I am diving this weekend and I will put some more effort/thought into breathing and see what happens.

    That is a good idea. I will do this. Thank you.

    I don't know anything about "diving response" pushing BPM lower, is that a thing? Resting BPM usually 64-65 BPM. My cardio condition is probably better than the average Joe, but the average Joe is pretty bad. Haha! I've always felt like I was better at strength than endurance. I competed in Powerlifting a few years back actually, but there's no way I could do a marathon (kill me now).
     
    chillyinCanada and caydiver like this.
  5. arew+4

    arew+4 Barracuda

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  6. Duke Dive Medicine

    Duke Dive Medicine Medical Moderator Staff Member

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    That's a really interesting thought. Most humans lose the reflex as adults but there is a small subset of the population that retains it. The bradycardia is accompanied by increased stroke volume and blood pressure which keeps the heart muscle and tissues perfused, but if there's subclinical coronary artery disease it may be a factor.

    Mike, from personal experience, hypercapnia symptoms can persist for hours. I've only had one CO2 hit, which came after playing slow-motion football with a sponge on Farnsworth Banks at about 150 feet in Mk-21, and it was a bloody awful one. Worse than any migraine I've ever had, and it too me out of action all afternoon. For hyperventilation to be producing hypercapnia it would have to be pretty profound and I'd imagine noticeable by the OP.

    This raises the index of suspicion for CO2 retention for me.

    Best regards,
    DDM
     
    Esprise Me and chillyinCanada like this.
  7. doctormike

    doctormike ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: New York City
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    Good point! Maybe pulmonary function testing? She could be chronically retaining CO2 and have a reset capnostat with a reduced respiratory drive...
     
    Duke Dive Medicine likes this.
  8. Duke Dive Medicine

    Duke Dive Medicine Medical Moderator Staff Member

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    Provocative PFT would be very reasonable. It would be interesting to test hypercapnic ventilatory response as well.

    @MykaDives , just to cover all the bases, when was the last time you had your regulator worked on? Have you noticed anything about the work of breathing?

    Best regards,
    DDM
     
  9. Esprise Me

    Esprise Me Barracuda

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    I'm wracking my brain trying to picture this but I can't figure it out...
     
  10. Duke Dive Medicine

    Duke Dive Medicine Medical Moderator Staff Member

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    Picture two narced Navy divers running across the bottom, one carrying a sponge like a football, the other trying to tackle. Passing of course did not work, but we had to try.
     
    rjack321, BenjaminF, Bob DBF and 5 others like this.

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