• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Can drysuits be refitted / downsized? Any drawbacks of this?

Discussion in 'Exposure Suits' started by filmguy123, Jul 1, 2016.

  1. filmguy123

    filmguy123 Professional Photographer

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Pacific Northwest
    177
    28
    28
    Can a drysuit that's too big be re-custom fitted and adjusted to a smaller size? Any drawbacks to doing this that could compromise the suit?

    How much might I expect to pay to have someone do this?

    Talking about moving down 1-2 waist sizes, plus about 4 inches shorter in height.
     
  2. KevinNM

    KevinNM DIR Practitioner

    2,922
    1,413
    113
    They can shorten arms and legs, though the seals and such make that a bit costly. I don't know about trying to modify the torso size. I think it might be more expensive to do it right than you think.

    I spent $300 to move the exhaust valve a few inches and move the p-valve and get pockets glued correctly. I suspect you are looking at the better part of $1000.

    And the drawback is that any change you make is another place it can leak. And if you tell them to make a change and the suit doesn't fit when you get it back with the change you asked for what are you doing next?

    I'd suggest thinking long and hard about investing that kind of money in a used suit.
     
  3. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC PADI Pro

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: United States
    3,392
    3,822
    113
    Don't invest money in a used suit you'll have to spend even more money on getting refit. If it's gotta be used look at a White's Fusion bag suit. The size range is quite large and won't require any refits because of the way it's designed.
     
    Hawkwood likes this.
  4. filmguy123

    filmguy123 Professional Photographer

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Pacific Northwest
    177
    28
    28
    Kevin - very good to know
    JohnnyC - thanks for that tip! To confirm, you refer to this suit?

    Aqua Lung Drysuit Fusion Bullet White Lg/Xl

    I would be an L/XL on that size chart (6'1, 200lbs, 34 waist, etc.). Should be a pretty common/easy size to find if this is the one you refer to? I see some on ebay for a good price right now.

    If so, thanks for that! Is this a good suit to invest in otherwise as well? Wouldn't want to pick it up just for the sizing if its not a good, well respected suit.

    Thanks again.
     
  5. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC PADI Pro

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: United States
    3,392
    3,822
    113
    Well, before you go jumping in to it, what dry suit experience do you have? Is it a requirement for your open water dives? What is the driving factor behind purchasing it?

    Aqualung bought out White's and sells their drysuits. They're bag type with a lycra/neoprene oversuit that holds it all together so you don't look like a giant trash bag underwater. They have several models. I own a Fusion One, but it is not my preferred suit. It does travel well and dries quickly, which is why I purchased it. Provided you have to have a drysuit, an inexpensive Fusion is not a bad suit to start out with, since you'll figure out what exactly you want out of a suit before spending the $$$$ on a new one. You really shouldn't pay more than probably $500 for a Fusion on the used market, even less if it's a One.
     
  6. filmguy123

    filmguy123 Professional Photographer

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Pacific Northwest
    177
    28
    28
    Ah, good to know.

    Need a drysuit because PNW are coolldddddd... and I can either rent one for my drysuit course and future courses, or own one. Since it's almost $100/day to rent, if I can find a good used one (and avoid depreciation) it should be cheaper than renting even if I decide I hate cold water diving, and I could still resell it. But, I do think I'll enjoy diving locally!
     
  7. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC PADI Pro

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: United States
    3,392
    3,822
    113
    Do your open water course before you buy anything. Seriously, I know you're chomping at the bit, but your buoyancy is going to absolutely suck in the first place, don't go adding another piece of the puzzle until you have at least a decent handle on it. Then get a drysuit once you can keep from being a yo-yo in a wetsuit. Unless all of your training from the beginning is in a drysuit (in which case ask to start now), focus on getting through that first.

    You will always be able to find a cheap drysuit, I guarantee it. But buy one now, freak out as soon as you get to open water, never dive again, and you've wasted money and time. It's happened. I know, it happened to a friend of mine. Re-read the reply to your post about slowing down. Then re-read it again every time you want to buy a new piece of gear before you even have your OW cert.

    I'm not trying to be a jerk, I'm trying to keep you from falling into the same trap that a ton of other people fall into.
     
  8. filmguy123

    filmguy123 Professional Photographer

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Pacific Northwest
    177
    28
    28
    I appreciate that! I'm doing my research now, so I am ready to buy in a few weeks. I do appreciate the concern... as it is, my GF does scuba, my friends do scuba, and I have already experienced snuba (kiddie scuba) which I enjoyed. The water doesn't bother me, and I don't freak out easily.

    I actually quite appreciated your post, it's a very good reminder to take it step by step. It is entirely possible my passion for scuba will subside, or I decide I'm not that into and just want to vacation dive in resort areas with the GF and family. Knowing myself, that's unlikely. But if it does happen, buying used and selling used - while a bit of a hassle - isn't the end of the world to me, or much of a loss. Given my personality, the hobbies I already love, my flexible work schedule, and the people I am surrounded with, I can't imagine scuba not being part of my life in some capacity.

    But regardless, I understand what your saying. Not need to rush it. Drysuits, yes. I plan to buy after OW weekend, so if I'm feeling hesitant about my passion for coldwater diving at that time I obviously won't pull the trigger.

    By the way, it's nice to meet you! I appreciate your help and input, and your concern. That is a bummer about your friend.
     
  9. Storker

    Storker ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: close to a Hell which occasionally freezes over
    14,675
    11,154
    113
    Doing OWD in a drysuit is quite common in some regions and perhaps the best option if dry diving is what you believe you'll be doing after certifying. Over here, all OW courses are done in drysuits, and I know quite a few divers who have never dived wet.
     
  10. filmguy123

    filmguy123 Professional Photographer

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Pacific Northwest
    177
    28
    28
    yeah it's sort of a catch 22. I was told by the instructors to suffer through wetsuit diving for a handful of dives before throwing drysuit into the mix, which makes sense, so I will.

    But without a drysuit, I can't see myself getting into PNW diving, so I've got to invest to get to the worthwhile stuff and see if I like it. It's just very uncomfortable to dive up here or gain experience without it, which is why its usually the first thing people do after getting their OW.

    The other tricky part is, up here in PNW, summer diving ain't that great. It's the best time to dive here in a wetsuit, which is why I am doing my training now in the summer so that part isn't miserable. But the reason people dive in PNW is for the fall/winter diving when visibility is much better... and when its much colder, and not terribly enjoyable even in the thickest wetsuits.

    Barring the highly unlikely OW freak out, I've come to grips with the fact that i basically need to own or rent a drysuit to figure out how I feel about diving here. And I'm fine with that. Well, I'm not fine with renting because it's a waste of money, and there is no way I'm dropping a few grand on a new drysuit unless I know this my thing. A used drysuit that I can resell later is what I'm after, even if its a few hundred dollar hit. Still cheaper then renting.
     

Share This Page