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Can I become a female saturation diver?

Discussion in 'Commercial Divers' started by missrachelle, Mar 25, 2013.

  1. Megan Pickle

    Megan Pickle Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: San Diego
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  2. MaxBottomtime

    MaxBottomtime Solo Diver

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Torrance, CA
    7,921
    6,219
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  3. Norwegian Cave Diver

    Norwegian Cave Diver Barracuda

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Calgary Alberta Canada
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    Her last posting was April 23, 2014. If you click on the persons name it will give you their last posting date.
     
  4. Megan Pickle

    Megan Pickle Garibaldi

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: San Diego
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    I know, I was just hoping she'd get the message and tell me her experience as a female, if she did or didn't get it. Directions to go, what to do, not do, etc.
     
    Norwegian Cave Diver likes this.
  5. Norwegian Cave Diver

    Norwegian Cave Diver Barracuda

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Calgary Alberta Canada
    282
    140
    43
    Your other option is to again click on her name and see the "friend" she has and send a message to her friend. Maybe send a personal message to both of them instead of posting on the forum. Might get an answer some day. Good luck.
     
  6. sealark

    sealark Barracuda

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Pensacola Fl.
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    Advise, stay away from saturation diving if you value your health. Get into ROV diving. I know several US navy divers that were involved in extreme saturation diving that are no longer alive. E Bay has a very interesting book called, Blind mans bluff. Read it you can get it for a couple $ on E bay.
     
  7. Heliumthief

    Heliumthief Angel Fish

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Scotland
    55
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    Saturation diving is as safe as you want it to be....if it’s done right, there’s no real downside, however if a company doesn’t follow best practices, or cuts corners then bad things happen...

    And ROV is a very different fish....for sure, it’s a decent career, but there’s no real comparison between ROV and diving. ROV is mostly electric, electronic and hydraulics faultfinding and fixing. If you’re really lucky, you’ll get to drive it occasionally, which could be something exotic like looking at something interesting, more often than not, it’s looking at something boring or taking three hours to disconnect a hook. There’s minimal ‘overlap’ between diving and ROV, apart from them both getting wet and sometimes being on the same boat...
     
  8. sealark

    sealark Barracuda

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Pensacola Fl.
    443
    173
    43
    It's the long term effects that effect the helium diver. Yes from the very few non saturation heo2 dives I have made. I have arthrites in most of my joints. And no I cannot say something else helped cause it. Ask a long time Sat diver about health. There is a reason Sat divers make so much money, is it worth it. Like I said in my post ROV will take over for saturation diving.
     
  9. Heliumthief

    Heliumthief Angel Fish

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Scotland
    55
    20
    8
    Well, I’ve been a Sat Diver for the best part of 15 years (that’s exclusively Sat diving, averaging around 120 days in sat a year) and a Diver for 25 years and I don’t have any detrimental health issues.

    Deep Air, Surface oriented mixed gas dives, bell bounce, surface 02 with tight tables....these are all going to be ‘bad’ for you.....sat tables from the 70s to the 90s were basically experimental, and were fine tuned to get the balance between productivity and number of divers ‘damaged’. This was addressed in Norway in the last few years by ‘Pioneer Divers’ who took the government to court over experimental diving in the 70’s and won compensation from the Norwegian government.

    Plenty of regions in the world still cut corners on safe diving practices because of economics and divers still get hurt. But they don’t have to be...

    And yes, there will always be an increasing workload for ROV’s but they will never take over completely while there are still shallow installations in poor viz and tide, built before ROVs (and even after- there’s a reason why a lot of our work is on wellheads behind an ROV panel...

    The Norwegians were confident they would cease manned diving by the year 2000. They were wrong then, and the workload is increasing. Like I said, anyone who has watched an ROV take 4 hours to disconnect a shackle, from a vessel costing £150k a day will realise that, whilst you can get an ROV tooled up to do many things subsea, they aren’t necessarily the cheapest or most efficient way..

    And of course, just look at ‘Big Red’ at UDS who has been investing heavily in updated research on Hydreliox diving to 6-700m, mainly due to the massive number of installations in SE Asia which will require maintenance/decommissioning in the future, which could be done by divers quickly and efficiently...
     

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