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'Clinically dead' rebreather diver dragged from quarry - and then revived

Discussion in 'Accidents and Incidents' started by DandyDon, May 3, 2018.

  1. jblack

    jblack Dive Equipment Manufacturer

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: United States
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    i believe some 30% of ccr deaths happen in less then 50 ft of water.... from low po2....
     
    rjack321 and lv2dive like this.
  2. Dan

    Dan Orca

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Lake Jackson, Texas
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    Have his CCR been checked for O2 supply malfunction after the incident?
     
  3. jblack

    jblack Dive Equipment Manufacturer

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: United States
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    a mistake like this could be from flying manual and not watching ones PO2 during accent... but all aside was a good save. happy to hear the person made it.
     
  4. Ayisha

    Ayisha DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Toronto, Canada
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    That is not entirely correct. Drowning victims still get 2 breaths. You can read it in your manual.
     
    AfterDark likes this.
  5. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas Central Plains
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    And small children even without drowning.
     
  6. 688ClassRebreather

    688ClassRebreather Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Maryland, USA
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    Rred, This is not exactly correct, at least not in the US. Hands-only CPR is an amazing improvement that has saved countless lives. It is especially useful in the first few minutes of an incident before more qualified help arrives. However, full CPR with rescue breathes is still taught and is recommended in several cases, including drowning. Here is the current information from the Heart Association: Request Rejected
     
  7. KenGordon

    KenGordon Rebreather Pilot

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    “Well your honour, although I was taught in my Sports Diver course to give rescues breaths every 30 compressions, and although I could see the victim was a rebreather diver and I had been taught that hypoxia is a likely problem for rebreather divers I decided, on the basis of what some twit posted on the internet, to just do compressions, because I thought that pumping blood though lungs still containing hypoxia gas was obviously the best plan.”

    People bringing up liability like this makes my blood boil. Your comments are the sort off thing that actually leads to people thinking it is ok to 1) not train 2) stand about as someone dies.
     
  8. KenGordon

    KenGordon Rebreather Pilot

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    There are two phases to staying alive on CC. Before the dive and during the dive.

    Before the dive proper attention is required, but I would not call that obsessive. You need to assemble it properly, make sure orings are clear of rubbish, the scrubber is properly packed and that you have the correct fills, follow a list and don’t discuss the football in the middle.

    On the dive you have to check your handset now and again. Regularly but not obsessively. On a flat dive it takes a while (minutes) for ppo2 to drop dangerously. To miss that you need to be getting it properly wrong, it is not a detail, it isn’t the main thing. You’d also have to miss the noise of the solenoid stopping or the absence of the gas noises, that might be called a detail.

    You have to balance the missed failure risk against the running out of gas risk on OC. Some dives become pretty marginal OC. Personally I am way more relaxed CC past 40 or 50m than I ever was on OC since the pressure of time is greatly reduced, also I can dive much better gas mixes.

    Keeping the equipment in good condition is more important than on OC. You can leave a twinset alone for a year, put it on and jump in. CC that will not work. A few years ago there was a complicated double fatality (maybe two singles, depending on how you look at it) where the initial cause was kit in (stupidly) bad condition failing. Both ought to have survived had they followed their training and been dived up. Keeping your cells in date is not obsessive any more than making sure your OC gas is what you think it ought to be.
     
    reddiver970 and Diver0001 like this.
  9. KevinNM

    KevinNM DIR Practitioner

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    It varies a lot. The NM Good Samaritan law also protects you from ‘practicing medicine without a license’ as long as you are not being paid to provide medical treatment at the time. However the Dept of Health will still try to pull your license if you violate scope of practice if you are licensed. The test case for the GS law was a couple of on-duty police types (I think border patrol) who pulled a rolled over car off a guy who was pinned under it and couldn’t breath. The decision was they were not being paid to provide medical assistance and were covered.
     
  10. rjack321

    rjack321 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Port Orchard, WA
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    OC divers always seem most paranoid about toxing.
    I am more afraid of getting dumber and dumber with hypoxia
     

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