• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Contact cleaner of choice

Discussion in 'Rebreather Diving' started by Jheard89, Nov 30, 2019.

  1. Jheard89

    Jheard89 Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Taiwan
    16
    1
    3
    So the most popular contact cleaner I've seen seems to be DeoxIT Gold GN5, with a number of online dive shops selling it themselves.

    Problem is, I'm unable to find it in Taiwan where I'm currently working.

    Could anyone please recommend some alternatives? The specialist WD40 electrical contact cleaner is sold pretty much everywhere here, but I'm hesitant to use a product I'm not familiar with on a very expensive piece of kit. Part of me thinks that DeoxIT must be doing something special, that other contact cleaners aren't, in order to justify the high price?

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Mike Walker

    Mike Walker Nassau Grouper

    125
    114
    43
    They have two distributors in Taiwan - try calling them.

    (Ignore the forum converting of what I pasted - the links do work)
    This item is no longer available.
    This item is no longer available.

    Given the amount of electronics produced in Taiwan I'd imagine it's very easy to buy by the truck load - but I'm sure you can find a retailer as well.
    CAIG products are very popular in the live entertainment business (particularly with audio companies) so you might look in that direction as well.

    It is worth noting that there are several versions of Deoxit for different purposes. If you want to waste a couple hours read through their site....
     
  3. davehicks

    davehicks Barracuda

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Seattle
    392
    261
    63
    Just get a toothbrush and isopropyl alcohol. Bush the contacts clean.
     
  4. tbone1004

    tbone1004 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Greenville, South Carolina, United States
    15,921
    7,292
    113
    @Jheard89 they're gold plated contacts, nothing special about them. Stock standard parts from industry. Just use whatever electrical contact cleaner you have around, just make sure it's good stuff
     
  5. Jheard89

    Jheard89 Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Taiwan
    16
    1
    3
    Ah great, hadn't realise. Thank you.

    Yea the variety of versions was giving be a bit of a headache so I've always just opted for the gold gn5 that I've seen a number of online shops selling in Europe and the US.
     
  6. Jheard89

    Jheard89 Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Taiwan
    16
    1
    3
    That's what's confusing me though. What differentiates 'good stuff' from not so good stuff?

    I tried asking a local rebreather instructor what he thought, but he reckoned the specialist wd40 contact cleaner could damage the o-rings in my battery and e-module. His English wasn't great though, so maybe he misunderstood and thought I was talking about regular wd40.
     
  7. njdiverjoe

    njdiverjoe Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: NJ
    173
    61
    28
    On the info page for wd40 cantact cleaner it says safe for rubber. What I'd probably do is squirt some into a small cup and then use a qtip or some other small implement to clean only the contacts.
     
  8. tbone1004

    tbone1004 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Greenville, South Carolina, United States
    15,921
    7,292
    113
    the "good stuff" will be specific for gold plated contacts and will usually come from name brands, etc. You'll usually find it in the high end computing and audio world which shouldn't be an issue in Taiwan since you make a lot of it.
    The two main brands are Deoxit and Progold for reference.

    As far as damaging rubber, you shouldn't be spraying the whole thing, just wipe on with q-tips, but it shouldn't degrade rubber.
     
  9. dcvf2

    dcvf2 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Belgium
    84
    47
    18
    @ Jheard89

    Power contact (1) or electronic contact (2) need specific liquid cleaner.
    (1) High voltage ( 230 V and more) and strong current ( > 1 A)
    (2) mV and A ( e.g. data logger) Rinse product needed to neutralize the corrosive effect of the cleaner

    The cleaner for general electric use are to aggressive for certain micro-electronic circuit.

    Ok with davehicks
    ‘toothbrush and isopropyl alcohol’


    But a "soft toothbrush" and do not brush the thin LCD connector 'engraved’ into the glass.

    I had a very bad experience with "display" of my heart rate monitor 'POLAR' ... very small cuts (3) caused by the toothbrush ... with too hard bristles.
    (3) only visible with a magnifying glass x10
     
  10. davehicks

    davehicks Barracuda

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Seattle
    392
    261
    63
    My assumption is that the OP is looking to clean and maintain the electrical interfaces on their rebreather. Cell connectors, computer handset & cable, etc. If you are cracking open the electronics of a heart rate monitor (?!) or whatever then please feel free to ignore.
     

Share This Page