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DAAM, it happened again...

Discussion in 'Vintage Diving & Equipment' started by Ghost95, Jan 21, 2021.

  1. Luis H

    Luis H Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Maine
    3,031
    1,374

    Actually (IMHO) attaching the harness directly to the cylinder with just bands was a very bad idea, because the shoulder straps are attached too low, just below the tank shoulder. This allows the top of the cylinder to move too much side-to-side. I have seen divers with the cylinder on their back diagonally and rocking (if they are swimming fast).

    The only way to control the side motion of the top of the cylinder is by attaching the harness to a plate that extends up past the shoulder of the cylinder. The real trick is how to do that while not interfering with the can of a double hose regulator.

    We have seen a few solutions that work, either a thin plate (like the Freedom plate), a somewhat flexible plate (like the Zeagle Express), or a plate with a cutout specifically for the double-hose (like the double hose plate). The thin vintage backpacks also worked great (The Nemrod and White Stag did not crack like the US Divers). All of these solutions are (IMHO) actually better than the original harness attached to the cylinder with just metal bands; they control the cylinder better and place the DH demand valve in the preferred location.
     
  2. scrane

    scrane Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Boise, ID.
    1,333
    1,016
    I lucked upon one of Bryan's flat double hose plates (thanks Lexvil!) and it works great for me in diving double hose and single hose. It's the only plate I use. It's especially great for travel, taking up virtually no room at all. I wish someone would make them available again.
     
    couv and lexvil like this.
  3. Ghost95

    Ghost95 Contributor

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Florida
    623
    667
    Hello all. Update from the first of the DAAM's I rebuilt. Got to dive it for a bit today. I pulled the bladder off my dive rite harness and got the can closer to my back. It did help. I noticed body position is important so weighting is important. Whatever weighting gets you to 30° heads up will give the best breathing. Just watch old sea hunt videos and you'll see. Not the most streamlined but breaths great.

    Anyway. I dive a small reef in a local bay and found the largest, most gigantic, colossal stone crab I've ever seen. I brought her to the boat to show the wife and then took her back down to the toilet I pulled her out of. Come October I have dinner. Pictures will be in the next post.

    Thanks for all the help with the rebuild. These are so much fun to dive.
     
    couv and James79 like this.
  4. Ghost95

    Ghost95 Contributor

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Florida
    623
    667
    Here is the crab. And me.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Ghost95

    Ghost95 Contributor

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Florida
    623
    667
    Also found these. .50 cal bullets from WWII training. Aircraft strafed targets in the water some time around 1942-1944.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. captain

    captain Captain

    11,099
    12,361
    Lake Pontchartrain in Louisiana was also a gunnery range in WW ll. The bottom is mud with a large population of Rangia clams. The clam shells at one time were used as gravel to build roads and parking lots. Suction dredges sucked them up along with .50 caliber bullets and spent casings. As a kid I found many in the shells used in our driveway. Shell use and dredging is now banned.
     
    Ghost95 and couv like this.
  7. John C. Ratliff

    John C. Ratliff Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Beaverton, Oregon
    3,003
    1,684
    Actually, the ol’ military harness works really well with double hose regulators, but on doubles. On singles there is the problem you mention, but not on doubles. I still have two sets of doubles with this harness setup. The regulator sits right between the shoulder blades, and against the back without interference.

    Now, concerning the single tank harness, I overcame this twisting problem with my Para-Sea BCD and it’s modified harness. That harness had no waist strap, but had two straps that hooked into a “hip connector” on each side of my hips. That holds the tank in a completely streamlined position along the diver’s spine.

    SeaRat
     

    Attached Files:

    Pressurehead and rhwestfall like this.
  8. Luis H

    Luis H Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Maine
    3,031
    1,374
    You may notice that I was referring to "the cylinder", as in singular.

    Even if you control the cylinder at the hips, it may not roll about the access of the cylinder, but the top can still move side to side, and that is what I have witnessed the most. This is specially true when the shoulder harness is adjusted to allow the cylinder to ride low, for the regulator to be between the shoulder blades.

    Out of the water with gravity holding the cylinder down, it looks like it is going to work, but it doesn't look as good in the water.
     
  9. rhwestfall

    rhwestfall Woof! ScubaBoard Sponsor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: "La Grande Ile"
    17,123
    20,862
    Chest strap....
     
  10. Luis H

    Luis H Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Maine
    3,031
    1,374
    That was standard... it only helps to keep the shoulder straps from falling off, but but the top of the cylinder can still rock.


    My experience (and observation on others) is that for a single cylinder a backplate with the shoulder straps crossed right in front of the regulator is the best way to control the regulator in place.


    YMMV

    I have a sternum strap on my kit. Sometimes I buckle it, but I often don't bother buckling it.


    I did a small edit. :)
     
    rhwestfall likes this.

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