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Do you pee less with drysuits than with wetsuits?

Discussion in 'Exposure Suits' started by DANDM, Oct 13, 2020.

Does your pee volume change with drysuits?

  1. I pee more

    7.5%
  2. I pee less

    53.7%
  3. I pee about the same

    23.9%
  4. My kidneys are a medical wonder

    14.9%
  1. DANDM

    DANDM Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Australia
    7
    2
    3
    Diving makes us want to pee more (most of us pee in our wetsuits, or lie trying!). DAN explains it's caused by immersion diuresis, caused by water pressure and cooler temperatures. I'm considering buying my first drysuit and I was just really curious, as you stay drier and warmer with drysuits, do you feel less of an urge to pee compared to when you wear a wetsuit (assuming same dive conditions and similar comfort)? I'll definitely add a pee-valve if I do get a drysuit, but I'm just really curious of people's experiences! :) Heck, lets add a poll.
     
    drk5036 likes this.
  2. drk5036

    drk5036 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Sapporo, Japan
    578
    472
    63
    I really want to know the answer to this as well!!

    as a person who has NEVER (honest!) peed in a wetsuit, I am wondering how long I can reasonably estimate to go in a dry suit. One hour wet is no problem, but by the 70 minute mark I’d prefer to be on the surface.... Haven’t had the chance to do a long duration dry suit dive yet.
     
  3. Superlyte27

    Superlyte27 Cave Instructor

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Florida
    3,941
    3,020
    113
    The urge to pee is the same as the mechanism is still present.

    Don’t buy a drysuit without a pee valve.
     
    rjack321 and Searcaigh like this.
  4. irycio

    irycio DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Switzerland
    34
    47
    18
    Too late :(. But I do need it installed badly.

    Still, I'd say that a drysuit with heating would reduce your urge, since temperature decrease is a contributing factor on top of the pressure.
     
  5. Whitrzac

    Whitrzac Angel Fish

    29
    14
    3
    In my experience, yes. I come out of the water a lot less hungry too.
     
  6. DANDM

    DANDM Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Australia
    7
    2
    3
    Diving is the only sport that has made me gain weight. Maybe a drysuit is a good way to balance haha
     
    D_Fresh likes this.
  7. kelemvor

    kelemvor Big Fleshy Monster ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Largo, FL USA
    6,566
    3,683
    113
    When I got my first drysuit, I included a pee valve. Although I attach the catheter each time, I rarely use it. I've been thinking about skipping it. When I dive without the drysuit, I go every time I dive - usually multiple times.
     
    drk5036 likes this.
  8. JimBlay

    JimBlay Divin' Papaw ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: South Florida
    821
    1,384
    93
    For me it's pretty much the same frequency wet or dry.
     
  9. MrVegas

    MrVegas Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Ohio
    170
    90
    28
    I usually try to avoid the too much information threads, but here goes. I was really worried about this when I bought my drysuit earlier this year. (A relatively inexpensive bilaminate with no extras.) However, I have found that the need is much less -- how would you say it -- "immediate" in a drysuit, so I voted less. Honestly, hasn't really been a problem at all. That being said, most of my dives are an hour or less. One thing too is that the more I use the drysuit, the easier I find it is to get in and out of it -- in fact, easier than a wetsuit.

    I did have one instance where a dive buddy had driven to a quarry, drank a whole bottle of gatorade, and then put on a drysuit and went in. About 30 minutes later, he thumbed the dive and made a very fast surface swim back to the bathroom. (I think there was a lesson learned there.)
     
    Dark Wolf and Esprise Me like this.
  10. Invader

    Invader Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Cherokee County, GA
    25
    7
    3
    I don't dehydrate (therefore need to rehydrate) in a drysuit NEARLY as much as a wetsuit because the water isn't touching my skin, wicking moisture from my body. I can go multiple dives and intervals without needing to go, and only minimal gatorade drinking (maybe 1 12oz per interval).

    That said, my suit does not have a valve, but Seaskin can put a 'Convenience Zipper' for you to use on the surface.
     

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