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Dry vs Semi-Dry

Discussion in 'Advanced Scuba Discussions' started by CattMollins, Feb 27, 2010.

  1. CattMollins

    CattMollins Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Fort Wayne, IN
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    Hello Everyone,

    I'm a relatively new diver. I'm working on my advanced certification this spring/summer. I live in Northeast Indiana and dive mainly in quarry's, lakes and plan to dive Lake Michigan this summer. I have purchased all of my equipment except for my suit.

    I am wanting to get in the water this March before the lakes turn over for the vis. I've been looking at the Pinnacle Kodiak suits and was hoping they would do the trick. I'm going to be doing single dives when I go out and would be down for 45 minutes to an hour. I have looked at the Whites drysuits, but don't have the money to drop on a new drysuit right now. Is a new Pinnacle Kodiak (or similar semi-drysuit) going to be more beneficial than a used or cheaper drysuit for me?

    Thanks,
    Matt
     
  2. irishsquid

    irishsquid Solo Diver

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    Can't say for sure, I've never used a "semi-dry" and I just recieved my first drysuit last week (Whites Fusion). Can you rent where you are? That would really help you make your decision. If I understand correctly, a new semi-dry will cost near the same as a good slightly used drysuit.:idk: Since you do own all your other gear, I would hold off on the purchase and try different rentals if possible. :wink:
     
  3. irishsquid

    irishsquid Solo Diver

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    Oh, and by the way; Welcome to Scubaboard!
     
  4. CattMollins

    CattMollins Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Fort Wayne, IN
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    Thanks so much! I'll try a few things out. Also, do you know of any good dive spots around Nashvhille? My uncle lives down there and I'd like to go on a dive with him this summer. He just moved up from Florida.
     
  5. Tortuga68

    Tortuga68 Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Puerto Galera, Philippines
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    It's always tough to give advice about exposure protection, as people have different comfort levels. I read a thread earlier where someone needed a 7mm to be comfortable in 73F, which is way more than most people would need

    One thing I would say is that "sem-dry" is a bit of a misnomer - "semi-wet" would be more accurate :)

    If you're planning to do dives in the future weher redundant buoyancy would be an advantage, then a dry suit would be a good investment

    I would look at some other options like hood/hooded vest as well

    And as Irish said, try before you buy is ideal if you have the opportunity
     
  6. Jax

    Jax Deplorable American ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: AZ TX
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    :scorned:

    :thumb: ^^^ What he said! :D
     
  7. irishsquid

    irishsquid Solo Diver

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    There is a quarry just outside of Nashville; named Marthas. Fred (the owner) has been working on fixing it back up for business. The amenities were primitive last year, but the dives were fun. The quarry still has the rockcrusher, shaker house, conveyor, pump buildings, assorted boats, and the friendliest fish ever. It's a big quarry, so you may want to do a surface swim to the area you want to dive. I believe it's almost 1/2 a mile across at one point. Farther south east from Nashville, (my neck of the woods) are LochLowMinn and Philly quarries. All are OK dives if in the area. Vis @ all the quarries is usually 15' min. (the worst I've seen) and up to about 65' which I have seen at LLM.
     
  8. elan

    elan DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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    if you want to enjoy comfortable diving in the lakes - dry suit is the way to go :)
     
  9. captain

    captain Captain

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    Semi dry is like being a little bit pregnant, no such thing.
     
  10. Crowley

    Crowley Master Instructor

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Planet Crowley
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    I own a seac-sub 6.5mm "flex" semi dry with dry seals and dry zip and have to disagree. Yes, it gets a little damp in there, but my torso down to my knees really is almost dry. It's so well sealed I have to vent the suit to descend and occaisionally have to try to stuff air back into it since it gets a bit tight around the family jewels - I am nice and toasty warm in 23 degree centigrade water which, if you're diving in it every day, gets pretty smegging chilly in a wetsuit.

    I am not familiar with the lakes but ask lots of people who've dived there before making your decision. You can expect to pay at least double the cost of a good semi for a dry suit, and then there's more care and attention that needs to be paid to it. Most of the "dry" instructors who work at my shop are complaining of leaks in what are very well looked after, although very regularly used drysuits.

    There are some excellent semis out there - Mares make a good one (I forget the model name off the top of my head) but it has similar dry seals and zip to my Seac Sub. Of course, a semi will get damp inside, but I can dry mine completely during a 1.5 hour surface interval. It helps that I work in Egypt which is kinda hot and sunny, even if the water is a little chilly in midwinter.

    Also, there was a recent post in here about layering - a hooded vest - I recommend the Sharkskin(TM) if you can find one, underneath a thick wetsuit (or semi) will be much cheaper than a drysuit and keep you pretty toasty in many environments, especially if you're not diving there three times a day every day.

    Hope that helps a bit,

    Cheers,

    C. (toasty warm) :D
     

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