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face-up underwater without a mask

Discussion in 'Snorkeling / Freediving' started by malipython, Jul 8, 2019.

  1. Jcp2

    Jcp2 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

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    I imagine face up to be a difficult position to keep water out of nose unless exhaling (like in a flip turn at pools end). Maybe a nose clip is the best solution. That’s what synchronized swimmers use, and they probably know best.
     
  2. mcohen1021

    mcohen1021 Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Texas
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    lol, i did not understand 90% of the original post. equalizing is equalizing regardless of mask or no mask. put on a pair of swim goggles and go to the bottom of a pool.
     
    Sam Miller III likes this.
  3. Outbound

    Outbound Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Michigan
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    This. You don't actively have to be exhaling through your nostrils to prevent water from going up your nose. All you have to do is exhale enough to create slight outward positive pressure. I do this all the time when playing around in the water when not diving and therefore not wearing a mask.
     
  4. malipython

    malipython Angel Fish

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    Outbound, yes, I know what is that "all I have to do", but face-up underwater I've never succeeded in creating that slight outward pressure and keep water out with it, despite 8 months of practice and a couple of thousands of tries... As I mentioned in my previous post, air refuses to act like a plug in my nose when I'm face-up and I haven't yet found an answer why. I went to doctors, had a septum deviance correction and nasal polyps removal surgery and I still can't do it. That is why Im posting on this forum, maybe someone more experienced fella knows the answer. I know my first post is a mess, wish I could edit it lol.
     
  5. Bubblesong

    Bubblesong Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Massachusetts
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    Please post a photo of your nostrils from several angles so we can most efficiently diagnose your Nose-Close-Woes.
     
    eleniel likes this.
  6. malipython

    malipython Angel Fish

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    Im gonna go find my nasal CT CD before the surgery so I can post them too. Btw, I also thought about a central neural system problem, mine may not be sophisticated enough to control my breathing that punctually...
     
    Bubblesong likes this.
  7. John C. Ratliff

    John C. Ratliff Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Beaverton, Oregon
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    I'm not sure why you want to do this, on you back without a facemask, trying to keep water out of your nose while submerged? While it may be possible to keep that water from going down your throat, it's not possible to keep it out of your nose. We, at the U.S. Navy Underwater Swimmer's School in Key West, Florida in 1967 learned this the hard way. Here's a small selection out of my memoir (so far still unpublished):
    Note that we could not keep the water from going down our nose and the back of our throat, creating havoc with the songs we were told to sing. Perhaps this will make you feel more human. :wink:

    SeaRat

    PS, this is one reason that facemasks were developed for diving, so we would not have to worry about this face-up attitude causing water to go down our nose.
     
    eleniel and Sam Miller III like this.
  8. John C. Ratliff

    John C. Ratliff Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Beaverton, Oregon
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    Oh, come on. You are not doctors, so give this diver a break. Enough of this on-line diagnosis!

    John

    PS, Malipython, please do not post those requested photos. That is ridiculous.

    SeaRat
     
    Sam Miller III likes this.
  9. Sam Miller III

    Sam Miller III Scuba Legend Scuba Legend

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: CALIFORNIA: Where recreational diving began!
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    @John C. Ratliff
    As always ! You are so correct !
    Appreciate your input

    I recall times when searching for California lobsters and became upside down ...it can be done but not a pleasant experience

    Put me down for the very first edition of your book -- lavishly inscribed

    Sam Miller, 111
     
    John C. Ratliff likes this.
  10. malipython

    malipython Angel Fish

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    John, I'd like to be able to do it, because I've seen with my own eyes many times how people (including a lot of friends and acquaintances) can be face-up underwater with air stuck in their noses so they don't flood the cavities, and how natural it is to them. Not one user in this topic also confirmed it is doable and that they do it all the time. If you are singing with a nose full of water it is absolutely normal that you get water down your throat. I know that the closing of the soft palate prevents water from going further down your throat, but your sinuses still get filled up with water. You never had to actually swim face-up underwater without a mask during your training? I've seen some videos even on youtube in which this excercise can be seen by freedivers or swimmers.
     

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