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Failed Artificial Reef with old car tires

Discussion in 'Ocean Conservation' started by Schwob, Sep 23, 2018.

  1. Schwob

    Schwob Solo Diver

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    Straight from the “Duh-Files”:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-45620299
    I am pretty sure that in the 80s it was quite known that tires are not totally inert...
    “Entirely inert” seems a much abused term.
    Even if you cannot smell it it often isn’t really inert and if you can smell it, like tires, inert seems like a very strange argument to make to me... even in the 80s...
     
  2. Bubblesong

    Bubblesong Marine Scientist

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    I day dream of building artificial reefs, and hope that from previous efforts, both failed and successful, we can learn the best way to create more living space for small fry to grow up.
    Granted, we should protect the reefs we already have. But creating more shallow reefs for snorkelers and Divers close to shore will keep the masses from making the trek to the better reefs until they have gotten some better diving skills.
     
    EdC, Schwob, lowviz and 1 other person like this.
  3. diversteve

    diversteve mod

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  4. lowviz

    lowviz Solo Diver

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    Totally agree. I often think how nice it would be to have shallow ocean dive sites made from 'jacks' every time I see the Manasquan inlet. A handful of linked jacks with no overhead spaces (think very short swim through) and a mooring buoy. For the boats, tieing into that would be child's play. For the divers, a well-defined structure covered with sea life.

    Well defined on the surface with buoys. How does one go about suggesting that NJ needs a new shallow reef away from the shipping lanes? This might be a good way to get started in local diving. Put them shallow enough so that freedivers could participate.

    I found this vid on the net. It will give you some perspective of the interlocked jacks. I would imagine something with less confined spaces, more spread out...

     
    Schwob likes this.
  5. Kharon

    Kharon Solo Diver

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    I don't think any flexible thing would make a good substrate for coral.
     
    Schwob likes this.
  6. Wookie

    Wookie Orange Man Bad Staff Member ScubaBoard Business Sponsor

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    Jacks are good, but have to be built.

    The Texas coast is littered (literally) with old ships that need a home, with granite blocks that were used as drill bit test blocks (for oilfield drill bits), all kinds of solid materials that make great artificial reefs. And they use them that way for baby snapper habitat.

    I was involved in an experiment to turn coal flyash into blocks as an artificial reef near the VA fogg site. 30 years later, it seems to be a resounding success. There is a lot of flyash in coal burning country.

    I tried to bring a barge of the granite blocks to Florida to create habitat for lobsters. The state wasn't having anything that benefitted the lobster industry. Go figure.
     
    lowviz, Schwob and ajtoady like this.
  7. emoreira

    emoreira Dive Resort

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    I've seen lots of pictures of the Thistlegorm. Those of the bikes and trucks in the cargo holds. The tires are still black with nothing adhere to them.
    Why a tire reef would work ?
    Who was the genius to think that. Was there any viability analysis done previous to damping thousands of tires to the ocean ? 6181034029_745447d170_b.jpg
     
  8. ajtoady

    ajtoady ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

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    Wookie stated!!!!---I tried to bring a barge of the granite blocks to Florida to create habitat for lobsters. The state wasn't having anything that benefitted the lobster industry. Go figure.

    Gotta love the "Politics" protecting us!!!:facepalm:
     
    Schwob likes this.
  9. Wookie

    Wookie Orange Man Bad Staff Member ScubaBoard Business Sponsor

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    It's important to remember, a large percentage of artificial reefs are thinly disguised open ocean dumping. For the guy who had tons and tons of tires to get rid of, the reef made great sense. And, if you need riprap to stop erosion of canal banks or river banks, a web of tires is perfect. Especially if they will hold silt and stay in place. Had they laid tire mats on the floor and allowed them to fill with sand, we wouldn't have this discussion. Instead, they built underwater mountains and covered them with a tire mat, and the result is not pretty.
     
  10. Wookie

    Wookie Orange Man Bad Staff Member ScubaBoard Business Sponsor

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    Something about lobster casitas.
     

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