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Fatal dive accident - Lake Werbellin, Germany

Discussion in 'Accidents & Incidents' started by Steph75, Feb 2, 2021.

  1. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas Central Plains
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    Yes, well, I have toured a few fill stations over here, and only one tested daily.

    It'd be great if divers toured the fill stations they use and ask what air tests they ran that day.
     
  2. hilljo88

    hilljo88 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: nyc
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    Not that anyone on SB would leap to a conclusion, but has it been confirmed that CO poisoning is to blame? Did the two victims use a unique fill station? It sounds like they were members of a group of 15 divers. Even if they were not diving as a group on that dive, are there other tanks that can be sampled? And what about physiological manifestations of CO poisoning like nail bed distal border irregularities?
     
    Nirvana likes this.
  3. Mod63

    Mod63 Dive Con

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Home of the largest gathering of drunkards
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    We will never know unless the family agrees to release the official findings. Autopsie reports are not entered into public record in Germany.
     
  4. JohnN

    JohnN ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Oar--eee---gun
    2,356
    1,171
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    I had to look this up, my memory ain't what it used to be:

    From Oxygen Transport - Regulation of Tissue Oxygenation - NCBI Bookshelf.

    So increasing the PO2 with depth is not going to do much for you (at least if you are on air). You'd have to be at roughly 5 ATM (~40 meters) to get the equivalent of huffing 100% O2 at the surface
     
  5. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas Central Plains
    50,231
    5,433
    113
    Nothing has been released I don't think. Often these cases are written off as drownings without exposing the cause, so we often never know.
    That wouldn't mean much. One tank coming off a compressor can be tainted while others at the same time won't be. That's a false security.
    That's not dependable. The only way to know is to test the tank before or after death. Before is preferable.
     
    hilljo88 and Johnoly like this.
  6. Jens Schuette

    Jens Schuette DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Close to Cologne, Germany
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    It looks like this accident is not related to CO poisoning. It has been written somewhere, that both had empty tanks.
     
    Johnoly likes this.
  7. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas Central Plains
    50,231
    5,433
    113
    The empty tanks were mentioned earlier, but that fact does not prove either way with CO.
     
  8. dmaziuk

    dmaziuk Regular of the Pub

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    It doesn't necessarily have to be at 1, it just needs to be "easier" to get to than the hemoglobin-bound O2. We'd need a nucular life scientist to tell us at what PPO2 that becomes plausible. (Recall that exhaled air is about .16 O2 so we only really use ~.005.)
     
  9. JohnN

    JohnN ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Oar--eee---gun
    2,356
    1,171
    113
    The increased PO2 doesn't change the amount of CO that preferentially binds to the haemoglobin, but rather the amount of O2 disolved in the plasma
     
  10. dmaziuk

    dmaziuk Regular of the Pub

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    Right, the theory is that at sufficient PP of dissolved O2 our metabolism will use it and leave hemogolobin with its CO alone, and the question is how little (or much) of dissolved O2 there needs to be for that to happen.
     

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