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Floaty feet with Seawing Novas

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba Discussions' started by Kimela, Oct 21, 2020.

  1. Kimela

    Kimela Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: St Louis
    667
    829
    93
    I think I'm going to take my Novas, my boots, and my Jets to my LDS and ask my favorite person (if they're there) for advice. Everything I've read there has been helpful. Might be my neoprene from my boots are making my feet floaty (thought they've got 300 dives, so I wonder how much positive buoyancy they have left in them?); maybe placing some of my 8 pounds in the tank band will help?; different boots, with less neoprene might help provide more negative buoyancy?

    When I'm going in for a picture I need to be heads down, often, and don't want to mess with what is working for me. If this is all psychological/mental, then maybe I just need to relax and see what I can make happen?

    I really value the advice of my favorite LDS person. Hopefully, they'll be available and can help too. Thanks for giving me so much great feedback.
     
    BlueTrin, ChuckP and stuartv like this.
  2. StefinSB

    StefinSB ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Santa Barbara, CA
    858
    626
    93
    If you are happy with the Novas why not try to adjust your body position a little to make them work?
     
  3. Kimela

    Kimela Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: St Louis
    667
    829
    93
    This is the issue! I THINK that's what I've been doing!!! I THINK I have a completely horizontal position (or at least perfectly parallel to top and bottom in a swim thru) but what is REALLY happening is that my head is closer to the sand and my fin tips are touching the overhead environment. Then I overcompensate and my tank is hitting the overhead environment and my feet are coming close to the sand. It's a weird thing. (Clearly, I already thought of your solution but can't find a way to make it work!!).
     
    BlueTrin likes this.
  4. StefinSB

    StefinSB ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Santa Barbara, CA
    858
    626
    93
    I am not an expert in everything like other guys here, but my suggestion would be to get a training/mentoring session and have yourself videotaped. You might also be stressing out so much over it that you may benefit from some more "objective" evaluation before switching hear back and forth.
     
    Brett Hatch likes this.
  5. Kimela

    Kimela Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: St Louis
    667
    829
    93
    I've thought of that too. Every picture I've seen of myself, and the feedback I get, is that my buoyancy looks good. But that's not the same as having a video of me TRYING to maintain a specific position. I notice my issues arise in tight spots (swim thrus and spots where I'm trying to get close to a critter for a picture). I know that when I fear I will hit the top I start to retain more air in my lungs and naturally begin to float - and I try to remember to exhale. But it seems like I grow an extra lung pouch where air accumulates without my permission!!!! So I have to really do a bit of mindful exhaling and just 'sink' ... and that's when my fins float up!

    If nothing else, this means many more trips ahead of me as I try to perfect this issue! :wink:
     
  6. NothingClever

    NothingClever Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Red Sea and Atlantic Ocean
    822
    969
    93
    I think moving some weight lower on your tank will be a cheap and easy solution.

    Do you have two cam bands or just one? Use the lower cam band to place some small pockets on either side of your tank near your back. You can use bean bag weights or hard weights in the pockets. If only one cam band (probably situated high on your BCD) then an option is to get a standalone cam band with hard weight(s) threaded on. You would slip that on to your tank and cam it into position low on the tank before sliding your BCD down on your tank. You could also use pockets on the standalone cam band and use bean bag weights but the pockets are likely to slide around unless you install some tri-glides on the belt (starting to get a bit fiddly). Just thread the hard weights onto the belt and everyone will think you’re a hardcore marine biologist like Dr. Earle.

    Agree with others to avoid the ankle weights.

    Keep at it...you’re going to figure this out.
     
  7. Searcaigh

    Searcaigh Chromodoris gordonii Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Dubai, UAE
    5,994
    4,888
    113
    Cambelt with a kilo or two pound weight lower on the tank will help.
     
    Kimela and NothingClever like this.
  8. Kimela

    Kimela Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: St Louis
    667
    829
    93
    I have two cam bands. This is one of the ideas I'm keeping in the hopper. I will change only one thing at a time - see how it works or doesn't - then go on to the next idea. I'm sure this will work itself out eventually. It might take another 300 dives ... too bad ... :(:D
     
    ChuckP likes this.
  9. NothingClever

    NothingClever Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Red Sea and Atlantic Ocean
    822
    969
    93
    You’re a smart lady, you’ll figure it out.
     
    Kimela likes this.

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