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Flying after 20ft dive

Discussion in 'Ask Dr. Decompression' started by anchochile, Sep 20, 2018.

  1. Asteve

    Asteve Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Colorado, USA
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    I find it amazing/sad that with scuba having been around for more than 50 years we still do not know the answer to this simple question.
     
  2. Bob DBF

    Bob DBF Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
    Location: NorCal
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    It isn't whether the plane crashes and burns, but whether it looses cabin pressure and has the cabin pressure jump to 20,000'.

    Risk management is not a simple question, and that is the question as there are already a number of written guidelines. Also there ase personal theories on why one could shortcut those guidelines.

    Since personal psyology has a lot to do with decompression, one has to make a choice on what strategy best suits your situation. From my teens to 30's I would push the limit a bit, and saw some divers ignore the tables and get away with it, but I didn't because I did not believe myself that lucky. When I had a family, I got a bit more conservative (for me), and now that I'm even older, I've become more conservative in my choices. What this means is that I now use the dive to fly time on my computer or usually longer.


    Bob
    "...you've gotta ask yourself one question: "Do I feel lucky?" Well, do ya, punk? Harry Calahan
     
  3. dmaziuk

    dmaziuk Orca

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    I've a feeling they don't "just" lose cabin pressure out of nowhere, chances are there's more fecal matter on its way to the fan blades when that happens.
     
    BenjaminF and JamesBon92007 like this.
  4. boulderjohn

    boulderjohn Technical Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Boulder, CO
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    There is always a risk in everything we do. We calculate the risks and decide if we want to do whatever we are planning to do. Everytime we drive a car we are running a pretty big risk, but we choose to do it anyway, because we decide that even that risk is too low to worry about.

    I have no idea how many airplane flights I have taken over the decades. I have no idea how many flights my friends and family have taken over the decades. I don't know anyone who has ever mentioned being on a flight when the cabin has become depressurized. I suspect the odds of that happening are pretty low. When I plan to fly after diving, I don't give that possibility any more thought than I worry about an accident if I drive to the store for a loaf of bread.
     
  5. dmaziuk

    dmaziuk Orca

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    We drove up Mt Kea (14,000) after and hour or so at the visitors centre (9,000) and both my BH and I felt a little off for a while at the top. I suspect plane cabin decompressing from 6 to 20K feet, and much faster, isn't going to be pleasant with or without diving.
     
  6. dberry

    dberry Hydrophilic ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Philadelphia
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    Funny you should say that... I was going to mention the scene from "Goldfinger" when the bad guy is sucked out the window. But then I remembered a month or two ago we heard about a jet engine failing, sending shrapnel through a passenger's window. She was partially sucked out the window, with fellow passengers trying to pull her back in. She died, although it certainly wasn't because of DCS.

    In any case, I agree with BoulderJohn's point about everything having some level of risk, so don't sweat the things you have no control over.
     
  7. dmaziuk

    dmaziuk Orca

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    Yes, the one case anyone's ever heard of, and the poor woman wouldn't have been any worse off if she'd dived just before her flight.
     
  8. johndiver999

    johndiver999 Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Gainesville FL
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    I don't understand altitude diving, but the if the computer "thought" you were diving at an elevation of 8,000 ft and gave you a NDL that you did not exceed, then that means you can get out of the water (at 8,000 ft) and be OK correct?

    So why is that different than getting on an airplane that will be pressurized to 8,000 ft - assuming no accidental loss of cabin pressure?

    That seems to be the most objective means to quantify the situation. Am I missing something?

    The several hour wait before boarding the aircraft would also seem to be huge safety buffer.
     
  9. boulderjohn

    boulderjohn Technical Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Boulder, CO
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    I have to admit I don't understand why diving altitude NDLs makes a difference.
     
  10. dmaziuk

    dmaziuk Orca

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    Theoretically, instead of surfacing with "safe enough for 1 atm" gas loading, you'll surface with "safe enough for 0.8 atm" (or whatever). Gotta wonder how much difference that'd be on a 20' dive.
     

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