• Welcome to ScubaBoard

  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Hdvseatek O-rings identified

Discussion in 'Training, Practices and Equipment' started by DandyDon, Sep 19, 2019.

  1. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas High Plains
    48,429
    4,216
    113
    Hdvseatek PLB dive canisters are great for around $100 USD delivered, depending on which web site you order from. Just lube the o-ring with silicone grease for every trip, more often if your trips last over a week, and replace the o-rings yearly. My problem has been finding replacements. I ordered a couple from the supplier in Australia, and he sent them okay - but surely we can find them here for less than $6 each?!

    Here is the label sent to me by Hdvseatek. I have no idea what all of that means or how to shop for the same thing. Anyone...??

    Edit: We had an ongoing disagreement as to the answer and which o-ring to order. This seems settled now, as the o-rings desired are 75 mm ID, and JohnnyC has corrected his post #2 to include the corrected link. McMaster-Carr

    My email to the company that included the same photo was quickly answered with a confirming link to the same model 1302N689.


    Hdvseatek O-ring.jpg
     
    outofofficebrb likes this.
  2. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: United States
    3,305
    3,518
    113
    Here's the (correct) McMaster link for the same o-ring. 70 Durometer is its hardness. 75mm is it's inner diameter. 4mm is the thickness of the o-ring (so 83mm OD). $7 for 10 of them.

    McMaster-Carr
     
    rjack321, DandyDon and outofofficebrb like this.
  3. outofofficebrb

    outofofficebrb HARRO HUNNAYYY

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: San Francisco, California
    2,876
    2,168
    113
    Brilliant. I just received the same email response from him.

    Thanks!
     
  4. michael-fisch

    michael-fisch Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Germany
    645
    374
    63
    Last edited on 19. Sept
    No No No! the 75 is the inner diameter of the O-ring, instead of the OD.

    Michael
     
    outofofficebrb likes this.
  5. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas High Plains
    48,429
    4,216
    113
    Entire spacecraft have been lost over such. It seems to make sense that the ID would be the factor to require along with thickness, but I'm only guessing. So, I hope we can settle this before anyone orders a bunch of o-rings that won't fit.
     
  6. outofofficebrb

    outofofficebrb HARRO HUNNAYYY

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: San Francisco, California
    2,876
    2,168
    113
    That’s a big difference. That could be a flood vs no flood. I have some time before I need a replacement o-ring. Which are we 100% sure about? It’s a hung jury so far. :) my understanding is that it’s a metric o-ring so it’s ID x CS but I could be wrong which is also likely. :)
     
  7. kelemvor

    kelemvor Big Fleshy Monster ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Largo, FL USA
    5,825
    3,024
    113
    Heh.. good thing I finished the thread before ordering o-rings :wink:. Would have been $10 down the tubes.
     
  8. michael-fisch

    michael-fisch Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Germany
    645
    374
    63
    wikipedia agrees with me:
    Metric O-rings are usually defined by the internal dimension x the cross section. Typical part number for a metric O-ring - ID x CS [material & shore hardness] 2x1N70 = defines this O-ring as 2mm id with 1mm cross section made from Nitrile rubber which is 70Sh

    Michael
     
    outofofficebrb likes this.
  9. JohnnyC

    JohnnyC Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: United States
    3,305
    3,518
    113
    I could have sworn I sorted by ID and just copied the data. Good catch!

    Updated the link in the first post. Here it is again:

    McMaster-Carr
     
    outofofficebrb likes this.
  10. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas High Plains
    48,429
    4,216
    113
    Yep. I have edited post #1 with caution about ordering until we settle this disagreement. I will attempt to edit again when we resolve this.

    Well, if you ordered the 67 mm o-rings to fit a canister with 75 mm OD, I don't think it'd fit.

    I have emailed that company for help.

    Thanks for your input.

    I looked around the house for something to measure my spare o-ring but have nothing that measures in mm, and besides - doubt that I could measure accurately. My attempt provided 2-7/8" ID, or 2.875" which converts to 73 mm, but my accuracy is doubtful.

    So are we in full agreement now so that I can edit post #1?
     

Share This Page