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HELP NEEDED ASAP FOR NAVY SEAL CANDIDATE...PLEASE!

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba Discussions' started by Jason Jezik, Dec 7, 2019.

  1. Angelo Farina

    Angelo Farina Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Parma, ITALY
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    Well, if you are scuba-diving, then better to learn Marcante-Odaglia than Frenzel. Frenzel requires to remove the regulator from your mouth and close your lips, and possibly also make use of your cheeks for getting more pressure. It is excellent for free diving, not so practical for scuba diving...
    The OP here is referring to a pressurized chamber, where his son is probably breathing with his nose, as he is not submerged in water, nor using a scuba system. In this case, Frenzel is the top method, allowing to use pressure created both in the mouth and in the nose, for maximum effect.
    But when scuba diving, wanting to keep the regulator in your mouth, you can only use the air trapped above the soft palate, without making use of your mouth. And this becomes the Marcante-Odaglia method, not as effective as Frenzel in creating very high pressure inside your nose, but much more practical while breathing from a scuba system.
    Then most people, including many diving instructors, do not really understand the slight difference between the two methods, and talk about Frenzel also when referring to open-mouth equalization.
     
    Johnoly likes this.
  2. NothingClever

    NothingClever Barracuda

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Red Sea and Atlantic Ocean
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    Duh.....

    Forgot to add that while assigned to NSW, he’ll be around operators all day long. They’ll demystify a lot of BUD/S and other training requirements therefore greatly improving his chances of passing the next time he undergoes BUD/S. He’ll still have to work hard but he’ll have a better focus for where to put his energies and how to avoid those things that wash out trainees.
     
    FreeFlyFreak likes this.
  3. Hoyden

    Hoyden Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Rockville, MD
    950
    113
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    If it is a congestion issue, I have two additional suggestions:
    Mucinex DM (Blue box, IRC)
    Neti Pot

    Both of these were recommended by my free-diving instructor and definitely help students in our class.

    Jackie
     
  4. cerich

    cerich ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 5,000 - ∞
    Location: Georgia
    6,706
    3,601
    113
    sounds like the POT(pressure oxygen tolerance) test pre selection in screening versus already been selected, and I am sure the folks running it briefed how to clear, and a medical type looked at his ears after and maybe said something that would help. Would be unusual otherwise
     
    Dark Wolf and MichaelMc like this.
  5. Louisville Diver

    Louisville Diver Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Louisville
    76
    83
    18
    I'm going to sound like a bit of a jerk here, but consider this:

    Once he graduates, his fellow team members are going to be risking their lives on his ability to perform regardless of any temporary physical ailments. If, within the context of his training regime, he cannot perform a basic, necessary task without great difficulty, not only are their lives at risk, so is his. Perhaps he may consider a different career path via specialty units in the Marines or in the Army? Maybe a Ranger tab is in his future instead, where his skills can be put to use without endangering himself or his fellow team members.
     
    Sam Miller III and KWS like this.
  6. MichaelMc

    MichaelMc Divemaster Candidate

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Berkeley, CA
    1,537
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    Yes, his team mates will depend on him. And, if history and team mindset is a guide and he becomes a team member, he would die to support them. That an operator in the teams would break bones, take bullets, or rupture an ear goes without saying.

    Rupturing his ears in training is not part of that path. None of his instructors are telling him to gut it out, be tough, and rupture his ears for the class. Combat, yes. Needless damage in training, no. Taking into account that broken bones, etc could be occasional parts of training, and similar causes for a rollback. And emphasizing, as others, medical roll carries no stigma. Assuming he put out his best effort in training routinely and overall. Not, misguidedly, in the specific instance of pushing the ear as far... as he could. Rupturing an ear in basic training is damage to naval resources. It is not best effort.

    In training, running up and down the beach till puking or passing out, staying in the water till frozen, hamburger feet, the class taking the punishment for the errors of the one, those are how supporting the team is tested and developed in training, particularly BUDS. The Navy has not seemed to feel that rupturing ears offers a benefit in that testing and development.
     
    Jason Jezik likes this.
  7. Nemrod

    Nemrod Solo Diver

    11,826
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    It would be a shame for the young fella to be dropped from the program simply because he does not know how to "pop" his ears.

    Of course, this being Monday, how did it go?

    N
     
  8. Diver below 83

    Diver below 83 Regular of the Pub

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: SoFlo
    1,146
    668
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    Curious as well
     
    Dark Wolf likes this.
  9. KWS

    KWS ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: SE TEXAS
    4,483
    1,077
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    I remember the chamber well. they took us to 50 psi or 50 ft I dont remember. Mostly I remember how cold I felt as the pressure dropped again to normal.
     
    Jason Jezik likes this.
  10. Jason Jezik

    Jason Jezik Angel Fish

    # of Dives: None - Not Certified
    Location: Bixby, OK
    9
    31
    13
    Back to the chamber today. I’ll update you once I get an update this evening. Thanks for all the great advice on equalizing techniques.
     
    driftwood, Johnoly, Hoyden and 2 others like this.

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