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How much of a factor is age in scuba deaths

Discussion in 'Accidents and Incidents' started by DennisS, May 19, 2019.

  1. MargaritaMike

    MargaritaMike Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: On a non-divable lake in SE Texas
    763
    581
    93
    Looking back, I think I actually tried to do both at the same time. I was unsuccessful. I guess I was too young.

    Cheers -
     
  2. Chidiver1

    Chidiver1 Barracuda

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    Plan is...if I'm not married or the wife went before me is to make sure there is enough of a age Gap to give it a good go. Shrug
     
  3. michael-fisch

    michael-fisch Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Germany
    579
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    63
    Best line I ever heard was:
    I want to die in bed at the age of 90, with the young wife of a jealous husband, being shot to death by by him.

    Michael
     
  4. Wathdoc

    Wathdoc Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: uk
    35
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    8
    A male, fit, in his middle fifties died on a club trip a few year's ago. It was the first since the club was formed in the early sixties. It was an easy, cold water dive and he was at the safety stop when his cardiac arrhythmia occurred. The pathologist was of the view that it was not dive related as such and it could have occurred at any time. The chances of serious cardiovascular and cardiac disease do increase with age, but surely you get your body weight sorted, don't smoke, do flexibility, aerobic and strength work you can minimise the risk. You simply adapt the type of diving that you do and use your brain.
     
    Sam Miller III likes this.
  5. drbill

    drbill The Lorax for the Kelp Forest Scuba Legend

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Santa Catalina Island, CA
    22,362
    5,192
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    Certainly age can be a factor... after all, younger males are often more "adventurous" and less cautious than us old geezers!
     
  6. Barnaby'sDad

    Barnaby'sDad ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Virginia
    611
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    "On a long enough time line, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero."

    -Chuck Palahniuk
     
  7. JamesBon92007

    JamesBon92007 Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: Southern California...too far from the ocean
    2,945
    1,147
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    Forgive me for not reading the entire thread, but for me, it's time to hang it up when I'm no longer doing the rescues, but when I'm the one being rescued.

    As for health issues: if someone has a aneurysm while diving it's a dive-related incident. If they have one while watching TV it is not a TV-related incident. Just saying.
     
    aquacat8 and MargaritaMike like this.
  8. DandyDon

    DandyDon Old men ought to be explorers ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: One kilometer high on the Texas High Plains
    48,180
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    An often seen argument, but how do you rule out the possibility that scuba caused the medical issue. Scuba is challenging at times, pressure changes, etc. Lots of guesses.
     
  9. MargaritaMike

    MargaritaMike Divemaster

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: On a non-divable lake in SE Texas
    763
    581
    93
    And gases. In time age will always be THE contributing factor to death. As was stated earlier "On a long enough time line, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero. -Chuck Palahniuk" :)

    Cheers -
     
  10. soldsoul4foos

    soldsoul4foos ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Portland, ME
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    I was on a dive a few years ago where this exact thing happened. The autopsy confirmed he was a ticking time bomb. Also, he was a (not to label) vacation diver, and it was his first time in cold, current, almost zero vis water. Maybe some anxiety developed which triggered it.
     
    Wathdoc and Sam Miller III like this.

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