• Welcome to ScubaBoard

  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

How to handle a blue-ringed octopus

Discussion in 'Marine Life & Ecosystems' started by Streydog, Apr 10, 2021.

  1. Streydog

    Streydog Contributor

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: DFW, TX
    1,072
    757
    Here is what not to do.

     
    couv likes this.
  2. davecampbell

    davecampbell Contributor

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    112
    101
    " my initial reaction was to pick it up..." what an idiot. this is exactly what is wrong with most people out there...
     
    Tournesol2000 likes this.
  3. Manatee Diver

    Manatee Diver Stop throwing lettuce at me! ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: None - Not Certified
    Location: Tampa Bay, FL
    2,271
    2,195
    Would last about 5 minutes in Australia.
     
  4. Pressurehead

    Pressurehead ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Queensland Australia
    580
    465
    On a beach in Bali Indonesia .
    Where I grew up in Australia you learn from a very early age not to touch these ,there are a lot of things here that can bite ,sting, eat and poison you, and that is not counting the ones in the ocean that can do the same.
    I am now going for a walk 2 min from my home and take a close look in the rock pools, I may find one of these, Oh they are there, don't always see them, I have to be careful as I might stand on a Stone Fish.
     
    Lorenzoid likes this.
  5. Centrals

    Centrals Barangay Pasaway

    # of Dives:
    Location: Hong Kong
    9,589
    3,497
  6. Dan

    Dan ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Lake Jackson, Texas
    7,317
    4,888
    One day at the end of our dive trip in Bali, I went to Pandawa Beach just for sightseeing. As I was walking on the rocky beach, checking out those fishermen harvesting seaweed, looking at patches of water pools for critters & small fish to snap a picture of, I saw something gliding over the pool bottom, it was a Blue-ringed Octopus. So. I pullout my iPhone and snapped its picture, as shown, below.

    665803A1-6A2C-4760-A2D5-C740BA14E7E1.jpeg
     
  7. Searcaigh

    Searcaigh Chromodoris gordonii Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Dubai, UAE
    6,555
    5,523
    How about blue-ring sex

    full.jpg
     
    Lostdiver71, hedonist222 and Centrals like this.
  8. Russjstewart

    Russjstewart Contributor

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Melbourne
    268
    150
    And the bite is reportedly almost painless. Blue-ringed octopus - Wikipedia

    B
    ack in the day when I was involved in a Life Saving Club it was not uncommon for people to wander in with a blue ring in a bucket. The first question was how did you get it in the bucket. If the person who handled it was there we would sit them down for half an hour or so. If the person wasn’t there we would send a patrol member out to find them, and then sit down with them for half an hour or so. We would also let them read the relevant chapter of a book a marine animal injuries, that we kept
     
  9. HKGuns

    HKGuns Contributor

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Merica
    635
    588
    Ya'll have more messed up critters than anywhere else in the world. I bet it isn't the only thing you learn not to touch when young. I have no interest in visiting AUS, mainly because of all the deadly critters everywhere.
     
  10. Centrals

    Centrals Barangay Pasaway

    # of Dives:
    Location: Hong Kong
    9,589
    3,497
    Box jelly fish and Irukandji
    Funnel web and Redback spider.

    There are 20m people living in that continent.
     

Share This Page