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Is limited solo diving completely insane for a new diver?

Discussion in 'Solo Divers' started by HeliMech, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. KevinNM

    KevinNM DIR Practitioner

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    Choose non-challenging places to dive if you are going to do that. Even boring. I solo dive in a sinkhole I've spent probably 100 hours in and feel reasonably confident that there are not a lot of things that could go wrong that would ruin my entire weekend when I'm doing skills etc.
     
    Jordan Trotter likes this.
  2. lowviz

    lowviz Solo Diver ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Northern Delaware or the New Jersey Turnpike
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    But, you see, you did not only consider diving solo, but you also had the courage to post.

    Solo: Nobody to blame for your mistakes, nobody to sue. Pure and simple, it is all you.

    IMHO, start with just 'toes in the water'. Just that will be an awakening. As you progress, you will find and solve problems that don't exist for 95% of the other divers on this planet. Zipping Rear Entry Drysuit

    Please share...
     
    soggybadger and shoredivr like this.
  3. tarponchik

    tarponchik Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: USA
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    I agree with @northernone
    With just 12 dives you will most likely do something stupid underwater so at least you'll be relatively save if you do something stupid in the shallows. After you get some experience and boost your confidence, go deeper.
     
    Jordan Trotter likes this.
  4. tursiops

    tursiops Marine Scientist and Master Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: U.S. East Coast
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    To clear some things up:
    • No, you can't take the solo course now and have them hold your card. The 100 dives is an entrance requirement, not an exit requirement.
    • No instructor who's ever read his/her insurance policy is going to "teach" you solo on the sly, forget it.
    • However, you certainly should be able to get some pool instruction on using a pony bottle as a redundant air source. You can learn that on your own too, but why repeat all the conceivable mistakes? Learn the best practices.
    • Don't listen to all the "I've been doing solo since I was first potty-trained" folks; they are the ones who survived. The people you need to hear from are not around anymore to post on ScubaBoard.
    So, sure, go for it. But for your own sake, take a decent redundant air source. That's not a SpareAir, that's a 30 cuft pony or larger.
     
  5. tarponchik

    tarponchik Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: USA
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    Come on, even some cave divers are still here!
     
    Bob DBF likes this.
  6. tursiops

    tursiops Marine Scientist and Master Instructor ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
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    Right, and some aren't. So we get one-sided chest-thumping on ScubaBoard.
     
    rjack321 and EireDiver606 like this.
  7. Steve_C

    Steve_C Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Raleigh, NC USA
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    I have dove there a couple of dives. Pleasant dives.

    There can be tidal currents.

    You can get wrapped up in a lions mane jellyfish, - we dodged down into one of the sunken boats as two large ones drifted by on the current passed right over us. Impressive animals. The tentacles stretched a long way.

    Dry suits can spring major leaks.

    There can be major algae blooms in the top layer and very limited viz in the top 10 feet or so.

    Realize it is a special area but saw some big fish. I assume fishing lines are a possibility.

    Gentle entry but you can be getting in or out of the water and slip and crack your noggin on a rock.

    Point is stuff can happen.
     
  8. runsongas

    runsongas Great White

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
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    my vote is you should stick to buddy diving for now. hopefully you find someone at the dive club meeting. my first 50 dives, i learned a lot dealing with stuck inflators, torn second stage diaphragm at depth, flooded drysuit from wrist seal failure, and getting rolled in the surf. you don't want your first experience with resolving those issues to be when you have no help and end up hurting yourself.
     
    LaserManGary and EireDiver606 like this.
  9. Steve_C

    Steve_C Divemaster

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Raleigh, NC USA
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    Good points but this spot has not surf. It is up a fiord. More like wading into a lake but can be some current as you move out.
     
  10. agilis

    agilis Solo Diver

    # of Dives: I just don't log dives
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    No chest thumping here. All my solo dives were in relatively shallow non-challenging situations. When I was younger, and into my early 60s, I did a lot of wreck diving off the NJ/NY coast, but never alone. I'm in my mid-seventies now, and enjoy easier less demanding solo diving, with simple basic gear designed more for sleekness than technology or redundancy. I only use my Gekko when diving from headboats in the Caribbean. No need for anything but the tables and common sense diving locally. All diving should be perceived as solo diving in any case. Much safer that way. The only fatality that I witnessed happened in a large group of divers.
     

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