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ISO Science Resources

Discussion in 'Marine Science and Physiology' started by Ryan Neely, May 12, 2019.

  1. Ryan Neely

    Ryan Neely Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Akeley, MN USA
    83
    25
    18
    As an individual, I have always been interested in how and why things work the way they do. When I first began studying photography, for example, it wasn't enough to understand how shutter speed, aperture, or film speed affects photo quality. I needed to understand how Ilford's developer interacted with the silver nitrate on film to create dark regions. I needed to know the science behind subsurface scattering or ambient occlusion. (This was only compounded when I started studying 3D animation and visual effects for film.)

    That's a brief primer for the following ask: I'm in search of resources which delve deeply into the science of diving. I've read this and am currently reading this. This and this are in my queue. I understand that PADI has a large section of science in their IDC course, but I'm not anywhere near "leveled up" for that. Additionally, I understand that SSI has a course called Science of Diving, but I'm not anywhere near an SSI dive shop and I can't find a link to take this class online.

    I'm wondering if anyone has any better resources that might get into the sciences of diving. I'm more interested in the physics, chemistry, and maths (only because I've never been great at biology and physiology), but I'm open to anything.
     
  2. tbone1004

    tbone1004 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Greenville, South Carolina, United States
    15,522
    6,820
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    NOAA diving manual should be in there as well.
    You won't get what you are looking for out of any mainstream agency textbooks. Some of the older GUE texts for why they do what they do.
     
    Ryan Neely likes this.
  3. Ryan Neely

    Ryan Neely Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Akeley, MN USA
    83
    25
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    Ooh! Good point. I'll put it on my #TBR list.
     
  4. DBPacific

    DBPacific Barracuda

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Oregon, USA
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    If you can find a book framing the 5 gas laws in a SCUBA context, I'd read that. I don't know of one but that's how my current instructor started us off on dive theory - from the chemistry and physics aspects. It helped a lot to get really in depth with them
     
    Ryan Neely likes this.
  5. Ryan Neely

    Ryan Neely Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Akeley, MN USA
    83
    25
    18
    Avagadro's, Boyle's, Charles, General, and Ideal? I'll see if I can track something down. Thanks!
     
  6. DBPacific

    DBPacific Barracuda

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Oregon, USA
    229
    127
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    I have a whole basic breakdown of the gas laws and how they relate to diving. If you want, I can PM you a brief summary to get you started once I'm home with my diving notes
     
    Ryan Neely likes this.
  7. Ryan Neely

    Ryan Neely Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 0 - 24
    Location: Akeley, MN USA
    83
    25
    18
    That would be amazing!
     
  8. Storker

    Storker Divemaster

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: close to a Hell which occasionally freezes over
    11,910
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    Four of those are just subsets of the ideal gas law.

    PV = nRT, or PV/nRT = constant. Remove the irrelevant variable(s), and you end up with one of the other four.
     
    TGIF likes this.
  9. DBPacific

    DBPacific Barracuda

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Oregon, USA
    229
    127
    43
    Yes, but it helps to break things down and get to know the theory of the individual laws before putting it all together. Especially since most chemistry classes don't exactly use diving applications as examples
     
  10. Storker

    Storker Divemaster

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: close to a Hell which occasionally freezes over
    11,910
    8,292
    113
    We're all different. For me, it's easier to remember only the one superset (the ideal gas law) and just strike out any variable which doesn't vary. Others' MMV.
     
    Ryan Neely likes this.

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