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Most frightening moments

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba Discussions' started by roturner, Nov 28, 2017.

  1. ScubadriverDale

    ScubadriverDale Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Monterey California
    37
    12
    8

    I will never pass up a night dive. They are extremely fun. Well except for the 4 inch gill slits yikes
     
    Mrs. B likes this.
  2. ScubadriverDale

    ScubadriverDale Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Monterey California
    37
    12
    8
    The cave system was im sure very fun. The lack of scuba dives was why you panicked and luckily you saved yourself. But what if another in your party had done that and run out of air and would have had to share air? if no one was over 500 then it could have been fatal. Im not knocking your post or the operators of that dive just saying it was probably a lot closer to danger than anyone realized. Im just commenting as I use alot of air and always rent 100s because of that. I am a thin guy but i breath more air than large men under water. Hopefully this gets better for me.
     
  3. Mrs. B

    Mrs. B Solo Diver

    41,263
    23,482
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    So today we were learning to roll and he almost let me drown and then I remembered I knew how to get myself out

    Sometimes the video will mess you up!



    I’m better than he is :wink:
     
    ScubadriverDale likes this.
  4. Miyaru

    Miyaru Tech Instructor

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: EU
    151
    184
    43
    Last sunday I had a new experience in a cave, a lost buddy.

    Coming back from a deep section, we arrived at the bottom of a shaft at 47m/154ft. As planned and briefed, I started preparing for a gas switch while ascending to 33m/100ft. My buddy was above me, instead of being at the same level for a gas switch. While I switched, he signaled an ok with his light, to which I responded after completing the switch.

    When I reached the ceiling of the shaft, he was already way ahead of me. I saw his light disappear in the distance.
    vlcsnap-181104.jpg

    No idea, at that moment, why he was in such a hurry. Gas problem? I had two thirds of reserve with me and he was swimming away from it.

    At 20m/66ft I staged a tank with EAN50, which was not part of the dive plan, but just extra security. That tank was still there, so apparently he didn't need that one.
    At 10m/33ft we both staged our EAN80 tanks, part of our plan - a slow swim back to the exit during half an hour while decompressing. Both tanks were present on the line.
    He hadn't been there. He had probably missed the junction and continued through the lower section.
    After clipping my stages and a light to the line, I started looking for him, but the lower section was empty. I returned, took my own tanks, switched gas and headed for the exit.

    That's when your mind starts running. Dozens of questions coming up along the way, and the realization that this day might turn into a search-and-recovery situation, with all the sh#t piling up, ready to hit the fan. No matter how often you practice such a scenario, the emotions that dive along with you are never there on a training dive.

    I found him 50m from the exit, switching to a staged tank of oxygen, which was neither part of the plan, just a redundancy. I took that tank, checked his computer and guided him out of the cave. After completing our last decompression stop, we finally surfaced. End of cave diving, time for a very thorough refresher for him.
     
  5. lermontov

    lermontov Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: christchurch
    649
    235
    43
    so what happe
    so what happened to him? did he lose line? did he run out of back gas?
     
  6. Miyaru

    Miyaru Tech Instructor

    # of Dives: 2,500 - 4,999
    Location: EU
    151
    184
    43
    There was never a gas problem, but he did miss a T on the line. He got spooked down there, for whatever reason. I just know that he did not give that dive 100% attention.
     
  7. ScubadriverDale

    ScubadriverDale Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Monterey California
    37
    12
    8

    maybe gas narcosis a bit? moving fast seems to me to be a symptom ive seen people speed up when narced even after getting to shallower depth.

    Hey quick question do divers ever hook up to each other in cave dives? I mean tie ropes to each other?

    btw wow if a buddy leaves you in a deep cave dive, I mean I might be real upset at him
     
  8. lv2dive

    lv2dive Formerly known as KatePNAtl

    # of Dives: I'm a Fish!
    Location: Lake City, FL
    2,241
    1,434
    113
    Absolutely not.

     
  9. northernone

    northernone IDC Staff Instructor Staff Member

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Currently: Cozumel, from Canada
    3,381
    2,765
    113
    The image that comes to mind is that happens when walking two cats that dislike each other through a forest on long leashes.
     
    Marie13 likes this.
  10. ScubadriverDale

    ScubadriverDale Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 25 - 49
    Location: Monterey California
    37
    12
    8
    laughing my azz off haha ok I get it
     

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