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Most frightening moments

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba Discussions' started by Diver0001, Nov 28, 2017.

  1. hook

    hook Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Cowiche, WA
    29
    19
    3
    Never thought I would be on this one. March 17, 2019 on the Big Island with a bunch of other retired schoolteachers. My wife, buddy, and I were doing a shore dive at Two Step. We had dove this site two days earlier, no problems. We went out 200-300 yards on the surface, planning to follow the coral back. My buddy started having issues at the surface, hyperventilating, coughing up yellow gunk. Didn't stop, so we called the dive. He was having enough trouble, I had him slip out of his BC then climb on it so I could backpedal him back and watch him more easily while my wife pushed. After about 50 yds, he said "John, I think I messed up.", eyes rolled back, head dropped toward the water. My wife caught his head, I rolled him into a cross chest carry and we kept going. 50 yds from the entry, his wife came up, needless to say concerned, I told her to go clear out the entry as we had a medical issue. As we came in, I realized I was going to have fun getting out of my gear to get him up on the rocks, but figured we were just going to have to deal with it. As we approached, two people who somehow hadn't cleared out, reached past me and in one motion pulled him up and began compressions and rescue breathing. There were about 5 people obviously way past my training and I became the timer. It was like a CPR training video, all these were trained medical professionals on vacation who jumped in when they heard of the need. There was an MD and her husband an anesthesiologist who was administering one of two oxygen tanks that had appeared while she monitored vitals. Took 7 minutes to get good pulse and breathing, three people doing compressions and two nurses rescue breathing as needed. An AED appeared, but wasn't needed. Took 25 min for the ambulance to get there, then he coded inside and had compressions for 4 more minutes. The hospital said they had a 2% survival rate on water rescues at that site, and to expect severe neurological damage due to lack of oxygen to the brain. My friend is a miracle man. He's at home, trying to get stronger, using PT for help. but still has the sense of humor that's made him famous. Spent two weeks in the hospital in Oahu, cardiologist said after the heart catheter he has no arterial blockage, valves working perfectly, no heart damage at all. He put in an ICD, internal cardiac defribulator, similar to a pacemaker but only hits if there's an electrical malfunction. The cardiologist at home said he might have suffered from immersion induced pulonary edema, something he said was extremely rare. Since then my wife has found articles about it in the DAN site and on this months Undercurrent. I wasn't scared during the process, but looking back I wondered if I may have done my friend a disservice by getting him back if he would be brain dead. I know God saw to it that the willing crew was there able to jump on this medical emergency. I wish I could find them to thank them. I wrote this without crying, that's a first, I'm getting better too. That's my most frightening moment on a dive, though we didn't dive.

    John
     
  2. Mrs. B

    Mrs. B Solo Diver

    57,187
    39,384
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    Medical care pretty good in Honolulu

    Ya done good!

    Sounds like pulmonary edema if it yellow and frothy

    Take care
     
    aviator8 likes this.
  3. hook

    hook Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Cowiche, WA
    29
    19
    3
    They are good, but wouldn't fly him to Honolulu until he showed neurological function. They had him in an induced coma, reduced drugs, his wife got him to respond. He's a miracle man!
     
    Mrs. B likes this.
  4. Mrs. B

    Mrs. B Solo Diver

    57,187
    39,384
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    Huh

    Interesting

    Spouse was MD over there and I’m a nurse

    I wonder if that is cost containment

    They only had Kaiser and FHP when we lived there

    What insurance does he have

    That’s disturbing if they were counting him out

    And not airlifting him

    Years ago my kids biology teacher died diving out there, that’s another story

    Probably shallow water black out
     
  5. Mrs. B

    Mrs. B Solo Diver

    57,187
    39,384
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    Sounds like he was never at depth?

    Maybe he has a little CHF brought on by exertion

    In any case you saved his life
     
  6. bowlofpetunias

    bowlofpetunias Oh no, not again! Staff Member

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Sydney Australia
    12,595
    5,968
    113
    Brilliant job! I guess it just wasn't his time. It is so wonderful and all too rare to hear stories with happy endings. Thanks so much for sharing!
     
  7. Neilwood

    Neilwood Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Scotland
    2,408
    1,410
    113
    Be proud of what you did. Sounds like you did everything pretty much perfectly.

    You definitely did not do him a disservice (even if there were brain injuries). Without your help (as well as all the others that aided you), he had ZERO chance of any function at all. At the very least, your actions gave him a fighting chance of a positive outcome.
     
    chillyinCanada and BenjaminF like this.
  8. chillyinCanada

    chillyinCanada Solo Diver Staff Member

    14,833
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    @hook, awesome job. Your friend was blessed to have you there at the right time and to help to the best of your ability. He was equally blessed to have had those others on shore.

    I completely understand your emotions. Give yourself some time.
     
  9. hook

    hook Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Cowiche, WA
    29
    19
    3

    Good point, hadn't thought of it that way honestly.

    Thanks

    John
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  10. hook

    hook Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Cowiche, WA
    29
    19
    3

    I wish I understood them! Thanks for the kind words, it is obvious God has something in mind for my friend. All the people were there and jumped in to do the things they knew. After being a pack mule (that's my expertise), I was really glad they were there.

    Thanks

    John
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.

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