• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

Most frightening moments

Discussion in 'Basic Scuba Discussions' started by Diver0001, Nov 28, 2017.

  1. Seaweed Doc

    Seaweed Doc Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Seattle, Washington State, USA
    676
    425
    63
    Hi John,

    First and foremost: Great work. You not only did the pack mule bit, but you assigned tasks and organized the situation until others could take over. That takes some cool nerves in that situation.

    I realize you're talking about a hypothetical "what if" situation in your post: What if your friend had been brain dead? Or in a permanent vegetative state? (Brain dead usually leads to complete death barring extreme intervention; the vegetative state would be more hellish for all involved, IMHO.) However that DIDN'T happen. And there's no way as a rescuer you'd know the odds of full recovery, partial recovery and good quality of life, poor quality of life, or death. As buddies or rescuers, we've got to intervene.

    On all counts, you and other responders should be lauded as heroes!
     
    BlueTrin and chillyinCanada like this.
  2. hook

    hook Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Cowiche, WA
    29
    19
    3

    I appreciate the comments Doc, I am coming to grips with all the possibilities that could have occurred. I am still amazed and impressed with the highly trained and professional volunteers who jumped in to help my friend. I am working on trying to find out contact info so I can tell them their efforts paid off. I am in contact with one of the EMT's (the one who performed CPR in the ambulance) and hope one of his crew might have their contact info. I was able to thank them at the scene, but then was more concerned with gathering the rest of our group and going to the hospital than getting email info. I figure they would be glad to know that their efforts paid off.

    Thanks

    John
     
  3. NAUI Wowie

    NAUI Wowie Manta Ray

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Silicon Valley northern CA
    727
    306
    63

    Awesome job, one thing, why did he blame himself right before he passed out?
     
  4. hook

    hook Instructor, Scuba

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Cowiche, WA
    29
    19
    3
    My friend is a very cautious man, he's been involved in outdoor activities his whole life and has learned to measure his risks. He doesn't remember much about the whole day. I can only think he might have seen he was not in a good position and realized he was going to need help rectifying it. We live 2500 miles apart, he's been given the green light by the docs to work at getting his strength and endurance back.

    Thanks

    John
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  5. Neilwood

    Neilwood Loggerhead Turtle

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Scotland
    2,410
    1,415
    113
    Good news about him getting the green light to start work on fitness again.
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  6. grey2112

    grey2112 Nassau Grouper

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: New Port Richey FL
    144
    45
    28
    My scary story (have had a few, but this one I recall in the greatest detail), happened 2 years ago. I've done probably close to 500 dives in 8 years, 98% of which are solo spearfishing dives. I was diving a new ledge and about 10 minutes into the dive saw a HUGE bullshark swimming along with me about 25 feet away. Not a biggie, I have sharks show up about 25%+ on most of my dives. He wasn't showing any aggressive traits. So I filed it in the back of my mind and kept hunting. 15 minutes later I shoot a nice hogfish. I made the mistake (since fixed) of NOT looking around while putting my gun down and stringing the fish. Imagine my shock to look up after stringing the fish and seeing Mr. Bullshark 5 feet from me, mouth open, eyes rolled back, coming in hot. I literally had a split-second to react and all I had in my hand was the spearshaft I had just taken out of the fish. Without thinking I jammed the shaft down the shark's throat and immediately kicked back - good thing, too. He chomped down on the shaft, swung it back and forth (missing my head by inches) and turned and spit it out. He swam off a little and I retrieved all my gear, fish, and slowly ascended. Surprisingly I never panicked - I honestly believe my heart-rate, blood pressure, and respiration didn't change one iota.

    Lessons learned - panic can kill. Stay calm, make decisions quickly if needed. Always be aware of what is going on around you.

    I also bought a Shark Shield that night.
     
    HKGuns, BlueTrin and CT-Rich like this.
  7. CharlieDontDive

    CharlieDontDive Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Philadelphia, PA
    61
    26
    18
    Setting: Point Dume State Beach, Malibu CA. Summer 2017

    Beach dive with my buddy Mike. Foggy day, smooth water. Loooong surface swim out the rock outcropping. On the swim out, we see a grey whale breach about 50 yards from us- cool stuff. Descend when we get nearer to the rocks. Sandy bottom at about 40 ft. Viz isn't great, maybe 15-20 feet on the bottom, a little farther if looking toward the surface. Mike is on the bottom too, ahead of me, just at the edge of my field of vision. I see him look up. I look up. Cruising above Mike is a ~13 foot long great white. I see most of the silhouette. White underbelly clear as day. Well f#@k, I think to myself. So this is the day I meet Whitey. ****...

    Truth be told, at this point I wasn't terribly scared. I was down here in his element, on his terms, not on the surface where I might have resembled lunch. I was, however, fully aware that at some some point we'd have to surface, and I was not at all cool with the prospect of having him underneath me somewhere. Being on equal terms with Mr. White at depth? Okay, I can deal. But being above him as he prowls unseen beneath me? That's gonna be a no for me, dawg.

    Mike looks back at me. I shrug. Might as well continue on, I signal. We proceed to the rocks. The rest of the dive is uneventful, with the exception of a sea lion that appeared very close to me out of nowhere and damn near gave me a heart attack in doing so. Towards the end of the dive, Mike turns to me. Surface? he signals. No, no, no. We swim in, on the bottom, all the way to the beach I attempt to convey in response. He seems to understand. We swim in, hugging the bottom, until we emerge onto the beach like seals beaching themselves. I literally stayed underwater almost until my mask hit the sand in front of me. Mike spits out his reg and turns to me, excited. "Dude, did you see that gray whale calf right at the start of the dive??"

    Wait wut?

    Mike, having been farther ahead of me and closer to the "shark," had been near enough to see that the big fish-like silhouette was in fact the offspring of the big whale we'd seen breach earlier. (He was able to see the dorsal fin ran horizontally rather than vertically.) We had a good laugh about it and it ended up being a cool story anyway.
     
  8. Seaweed Doc

    Seaweed Doc Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Seattle, Washington State, USA
    676
    425
    63
    Great story! Minor thing, the tail is not the dorsal fin. It's the caudal fin you mean.
     
  9. CharlieDontDive

    CharlieDontDive Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: Philadelphia, PA
    61
    26
    18
    ah crap, you're right...haha.
     
  10. Seaweed Doc

    Seaweed Doc Marine Scientist

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Seattle, Washington State, USA
    676
    425
    63
    That'd be the anal fin. :wink:

    (And that's about the extent of my fish knowledge.)
     

Share This Page