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Nauseated during dive

Discussion in 'New Divers & Those Considering Diving' started by UODuckman2002, Jun 12, 2021.

  1. rob.mwpropane

    rob.mwpropane Contributor

    1,722
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    Always the extreme exceptions. Maybe I should have said it gets better for most of the people who continue on.

    I have to give it to to your buddy....not sure if I would still be getting on a boat after a while. Being seasick is no fun. I use Scolpamine patches, I'm sure he's tried everything? With those I can eat, laugh, use the head downstairs all while rocking back and forth.
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  2. Shasta_man

    Shasta_man Contributor

    2,650
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    Early on you mentioned that it was a long walk to the water after suiting up. Getting overheated before going out won't be the sole cause but doesn't help either.

    Many people jump in the water and then get suited up, but that's not available to you, either leave your suit open/off to the waist until you get to the water or simply pour some cold water on your head to cool it down. You don't have to drench your head, just some cool water will help you feel cooler. Do that just before you start suiting up and just before the walk so you start at a cooler point before the walk. Pour some of it in the body too because hydration is a good thing to feel better overall.

    Incidentally I use Bonine for liveaboard diving until I have my sealegs but also find seasickness itself is somewhat mental. If you distract yourself by doing something and not think about it, you are LESS prone to start feeling it. No sure prevention but I have used that to stave it off a few times when the boat started bobbing once forward headway stops.
     
  3. chillyinCanada

    chillyinCanada ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

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    He told me that he just considers it part of his dive. Smh
     
    rob.mwpropane likes this.
  4. Regulatrix

    Regulatrix Registered

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Texas
    50
    24
    Hi, Duckman:

    I can definitely empathize. I get motion sick very easily. My very first day of blue water diving, after only a very short boat ride into only slightly choppy seas, I threw up 9 times (literally--I kept count). I started to get nauseous at the surface as we were waiting to descend--my system did not like bobbing like a cork. Then I had a little trouble equalizing as we first descended, which meant that I was still near the surface, experiencing the surge. Blergh. The vomiting started soon thereafter, even dosed up on Dramamine. The next day was better, because the seas were calmer, but a I still threw up multiple times, and a multi-hour boat ride on that trip to watch whale sharks was a real vomit-fest.

    The good news is that I learned a few things that help. First, I don't eat any solid food before the morning dive. And then I only eat minimally if we're taking a surface interval. Second, staying well-hydrated seems to help. Third, and hallelujah, I got turned onto scopolamine patches! Some people don't like it because they experience some of the possible side effects. But for me, it works very well without any noticeable side effects. The second summer of blue water diving was *so much* better.

    i hope this helps!
     
    Pittsburgh_Mom likes this.
  5. rob.mwpropane

    rob.mwpropane Contributor

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    I agree about the patches, disagree about eating. I wouldn't say I eat a ton, but me and most of the people that I know do better when eating a small meal before going out. Something small, maybe scrambled eggs and toast. It's counterintuitive, but it works for me. Something light at the SI also.
     
  6. Regulatrix

    Regulatrix Registered

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Texas
    50
    24
    Absolutely--I meant that fasting or eating very lightly works *for me.* I've also found that, over time, I can eat a little without tossing my cookies. At some point, you do have to eat, of course! FWIW, the staff in my boat recommended avoiding fatty foods, including dairy, but I think you just have to test out what does and does not work for you individually.
     
    rob.mwpropane likes this.
  7. chillyinCanada

    chillyinCanada ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

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    If you eat, make sure to thoroughly chew your food.
     
  8. JustSurfaceInterval

    JustSurfaceInterval ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Germany
    278
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    And that's only partly a joke: if you have to puke, the better you chewed the better you will get that through your regulator.
    Never remove it before feeding the fish, just accept that you have to and do it with "enthusiasm" so that you get as much out as possible in one go.
    Once the business is done, purge your reg and if you fancy rince your mouth with a little bit of water, don't swallow.
    Have your octopus in one hand ready in case something obstruct your main supply.
    You may also put the tip of your tongue up against your throat to avoid getting water (or somethingelse) in your throad.
    Do i report personal experience and practice here? maybe...
    :D:confused:
     
    chillyinCanada likes this.
  9. napDiver

    napDiver ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 100 - 199
    Location: California
    293
    121
    I get sea sick and motionsickness fairly easy. Doing it a lot helps desensitized the stressor for me. I tend to have the issue more out of water... I also noticed that if I slow down my ascent rate to 3ft/min it is greatly reduced.
     
  10. chillyinCanada

    chillyinCanada ScubaBoard Supporter Staff Member ScubaBoard Supporter

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    From the safety stop, you mean or?
     

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