• Welcome to ScubaBoard


  1. Welcome to ScubaBoard, the world's largest scuba diving community. Registration is not required to read the forums, but we encourage you to join. Joining has its benefits and enables you to participate in the discussions.

    Benefits of registering include

    • Ability to post and comment on topics and discussions.
    • A Free photo gallery to share your dive photos with the world.
    • You can make this box go away

    Joining is quick and easy. Login or Register now by clicking on the button

No Ditch-able weights with BP/W

Discussion in 'Advanced Scuba Discussions' started by Daebado, Mar 12, 2019.

  1. shurite7

    shurite7 Dive Shop

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Missoula, MT
    827
    285
    63
    It doesn't take that much time to pull out a lift bag or smb and inflate it, especially if one practices every so often. My open water students do it in less 30 seconds in the late wearing gloves and hoods. Perhaps practicing a skill a few times is too much for a recreational diver and asking too much. Hopefully not the case for you.



    I've dealt with a diver who got my attention and handed me his corrugated inflator hose which came off at the elbow during the descent. I took it from him and pushed it back onto the elbow then borrowed his slate and wrote "don't pull this to deflate, use your right shoulder dump." The diver held his place without sinking or floating up while I reinserted the hose. He did a nice job keeping his composer and kicking to maintain depth. We were at a hundred feet when he handed me the inflator hose.

    If one is descending because of an overweighting or bcd issue then he/she needs to get kick like mad (feet in the down position, obviously) and ditch the scuba unit. But then again, this goes back to my comment above, this might be asking too much for the person who doesn't want to practice skills or become a proficient swimmer because it takes effort.
     
  2. johndiver999

    johndiver999 Barracuda

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: Gainesville FL
    434
    322
    63
    If the diver sits on it, with half on one side and half on another, he should be able to vent gas from one half of the smb. so I could see that be somewhat workable, but dropping some lead sure seems like a better idea, especially with an uncontrollable descent.
     
    rsingler likes this.
  3. Daebado

    Daebado Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Kansas
    19
    15
    3
    Thanks for the links. I must have done something wrong in my search.

    I got to page 30 of the first link before I finally bailed. People are quite passionate about this subject! Came back to this post to find 3 more pages had been added in what amounts to basically a continuation of the 42 pager! I think the message is imprinted on my skull, now. I can be neutral at 80' with almost no air in my wing. I can fin any direction (up, down, sideways) with ease and all it takes to start to ascend is a deep breath so I am not worried anymore. What little air I do have in my wing expands just enough as I ascend that I have to let a little out to be neutral at my safety stop.

    Just hadn't thought about it in those terms until the members in here showed me the light. I can see advantages to having ditch-able weights but until I'm in a much thicker wetsuit, it doesn't look like I'll be using them.

    Now, on to the second link and more reading!
     
    Eric Sedletzky, Ayisha and rsingler like this.
  4. rongoodman

    rongoodman ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Albany, NY
    4,566
    1,374
    113
    If you're neutral with a full tank and no air in your wing, how are you not going to be too light after you've used 5 lbs of gas?
     
    CT-Rich and Jay_Antipodean like this.
  5. Ayisha

    Ayisha DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Toronto, Canada
    2,687
    925
    113
    There isn't any need to kick down if you dive a balanced rig. Honestly.
     
    Sam Miller III likes this.
  6. Ayisha

    Ayisha DIR Practitioner

    # of Dives: 200 - 499
    Location: Toronto, Canada
    2,687
    925
    113
    I’m not an official and I'm not giving you a story. :wink:
    The harness is a continuous webbing that is almost infinitely adjustable. How is it difficult to have it as loose as you would like? If it's not easy to get in or out, loosen it up. Half an inch to an inch (1.25 - 2.5 cm) loose is enough to have a comfortable fit. Want it looser? No problem. It has a crotch strap that is extremely adjustable and the wing's not going anywhere.
     
    Sam Miller III likes this.
  7. KWS

    KWS ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 500 - 999
    Location: SE TEXAS
    3,793
    753
    113
    I would look at the possible failure of some sorts. like being 100 ft and gettng a blown wing. If it is at the start of the dive you go heavyperhaps -12 in a shorty but only -6 at mostt ifg only a skin. I dont see a problem as opposed to being in cold water with a thick suit. You can swim it up and let the wet suit take over your lift.
     
  8. Jay_Antipodean

    Jay_Antipodean Need to dive more!

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Melbourne, OZ.
    467
    189
    43
    I think you're confused or we've got crossed wires .... You had said that when ditching some weight "they certainly can have an uncontrolled ascent by the time they get shallower." and I suggested playing with Rob's SS tool, and that shows it's not uncontrolled and kicking down would be a way to mitigate that.
     
  9. Daebado

    Daebado Angel Fish

    # of Dives: 50 - 99
    Location: Kansas
    19
    15
    3
    I actually said, "almost" no air in my wing. There is some air in there to be sure, just not much. As stated in my post, it's enough that as I ascend, it expands and I have to let a little out. This is normal, is it not?
     
    Ayisha and Trailboss123 like this.
  10. Trailboss123

    Trailboss123 ScubaBoard Supporter ScubaBoard Supporter

    # of Dives: 1,000 - 2,499
    Location: Tacoma, WA & Channel Islands, CA- USA
    1,566
    1,300
    113
    Not sure who recommended this or what the context was, but taking a deep breath and ascending is a recipe for a lung over-expansion injury and should be avoided at all cost.
     
    Lostdiver71 likes this.

Share This Page